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Re: [PPLetterpress] Kreene?

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  • typetom@aol.com
    In a message dated 3/3/2002 wayne@hiwire.com.au writes:
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 3, 2002
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      In a message dated 3/3/2002 wayne@... writes:
      << kreene or pvc instead of glass (which I understand absorbs important UVA)
      >>

      Hi Wayne,
      I don't believe using glass is a problem due to absorbing too much UV light.
      I have been getting good plates from a home set-up using a glass-covered
      vaccuum frame. Kreene may provide better contact between the negative and the
      plate, however. The problem I had with the glass is that the vaccuum
      apparently bends the glass slightly and thus may cause uneven contact between
      the neg and the plate. Following someone's suggestion on Letpress or PP
      lists, I tried placing pieces of matboard around the plate material, under
      the glass (about the same thickness as the neg and plate material together).
      This supports the glass during vaccuum and has solved the uneven contact.

      My 4 UV flourescent bulbs are about 1 1/2 inches above the plates. Exposure
      time is about 2 1/2 to 3 minutes depending on image detail and design. Sounds
      like you are making a bigger system. Mostly I'm making small plates, most
      less than 5x7, have done a few larger 8x10, though I often expose numerous
      smaller plates at the same time, frequently an 8 1/2 x 11 negative with
      multiple plates under it. I fit in the matboard all around and between the
      plates. (Note also: some difference in hand-washout between small and larger
      plates...).

      I'm glad to hear of others' exposure experience -- I was about to try kreene
      but found the glass unit works fine for me now.
      Let us know how it works for you! Tom

      Tom Parson
      Now It's Up To You Publications
      157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
      (303) 777-8951
      http://members.aol.com/typetom
    • Mark Attwood
      Wayne wrote:, ... I tot use a glass vacuum frame and find that I get really good sharp plates. I had one very large plate made by a company who uses the kreene
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 4, 2002
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        Wayne wrote:,
        > I don't believe using glass is a problem due to absorbing too much UV light.
        > I have been getting good plates from a home set-up using a glass-covered
        > vaccuum frame.

        I tot use a glass vacuum frame and find that I get really good sharp plates.
        I had one very large plate made by a company who uses the kreene cover, and
        find that my plates are just as sharp and print as well.

        regards,
        Mark.

        Mark Attwood

        The Artists' Press
        Box 623
        Newtown
        2113
        South Africa

        Tel. +27 11 836 5474
        fax. +27 11 836 6858
        mark@...


        ----------
        >From: typetom@...
        >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Kreene?
        >Date: Mon, Mar 4, 2002, 5:10 am
        >

        > In a message dated 3/3/2002 wayne@... writes:
        > << kreene or pvc instead of glass (which I understand absorbs important UVA)
        >>>
        >
        > Hi Wayne,
        > I don't believe using glass is a problem due to absorbing too much UV light.
        > I have been getting good plates from a home set-up using a glass-covered
        > vaccuum frame. Kreene may provide better contact between the negative and the
        > plate, however. The problem I had with the glass is that the vaccuum
        > apparently bends the glass slightly and thus may cause uneven contact between
        > the neg and the plate. Following someone's suggestion on Letpress or PP
        > lists, I tried placing pieces of matboard around the plate material, under
        > the glass (about the same thickness as the neg and plate material together).
        > This supports the glass during vaccuum and has solved the uneven contact.
        >
        > My 4 UV flourescent bulbs are about 1 1/2 inches above the plates. Exposure
        > time is about 2 1/2 to 3 minutes depending on image detail and design. Sounds
        > like you are making a bigger system. Mostly I'm making small plates, most
        > less than 5x7, have done a few larger 8x10, though I often expose numerous
        > smaller plates at the same time, frequently an 8 1/2 x 11 negative with
        > multiple plates under it. I fit in the matboard all around and between the
        > plates. (Note also: some difference in hand-washout between small and larger
        > plates...).
        >
        > I'm glad to hear of others' exposure experience -- I was about to try kreene
        > but found the glass unit works fine for me now.
        > Let us know how it works for you! Tom
        >
        > Tom Parson
        > Now It's Up To You Publications
        > 157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
        > (303) 777-8951
        > http://members.aol.com/typetom
        >
        > To respond to this message or post a message to the membership:
        > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Encountering problems?
        > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
      • Joel Benson
        Hi Wayne, I just spent all weekend working on the same project! I have a NuArc exposure unit of some kind that I m modifying to do photopolymer with. I built
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 4, 2002
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          Hi Wayne,

          I just spent all weekend working on the same project! I have a NuArc exposure unit of some kind that I'm modifying to do photopolymer with. I built a vacuum table to put in the box that I modeled on the Polimero one that I used to use.

          I mounted a scrap of formica on a piece of plywood (I would think a piece of old countertop or even that melamine that they make cheap furniture out of would do) and then scored a grid into the surface with a router. Careful not to run the scores off the edge of the formica, keep an edge of about an inch. I drilled five 1/8" holes through crosspoints in the formica, and ran the vacuum hose to the five holes.

          Brian Allen is right about the suction being enough to hold the Kreene down. Every now and then you may get a wrinkle in the Kreene that you have to weight down with a lead slug, but other than that...

          I tried using the Kreene on top of a rubber vacuum blanket that came in the exposure unit, and that is designed to be pulled up against glass by the suction. I couldn't get it to seal, even with the Kreene mounted in the frame that had held the glass. My conclusion is that in a vacuum assembly you need one flexible surface and one rigid surface to get a good seal. Rubber vacuum blanket against glass works, Kreene against formica works.

          I'm more comfortable making the plates under Kreene because that is how I learned to do it. I'm glad to hear that others have figured out how to do it consistently with glass, and I've taken notes for the future. It is nice to know there isn't only one way to do it.

          BTW, I got my vacuum pump second-hand from Harold Kyle at Boxcar Press and I believe he said he had a couple more, if you're looking for one.

          Joel

          Joel Benson
          Dependable Letterpress
          San Francisco

          -----Original Message-----
          From: cutncrease [mailto:wayne@...]
          Sent: Sunday, March 03, 2002 4:40 PM
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [PPLetterpress] Kreene?


          I've just built myself a neat little A3 exposure unit (8XSylania 350BLs which sit 2 inches above the plate) I'm now attempting the vacuum frame. I've
          seen much info about using kreene or pvc instead of glass (which I understand absorbs important UVA). Just wondering if anyone could explain how the
          kreene is sealed around a vacuum blanket and frame in order to create good contact between plate and film. Should I be looking at some kind of
          snaplock system (like in a vacuum bagging process) or does the sheet of kreene go under a sheet of pvc which is hinged to the frame in a standard
          manner. Should I be using kreene in a fluro exposure system or is it for single point light sources only? Any help would be much appreciated.

          Many thanks,
          Wayne Davis








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