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RE: [PPLetterpress] Metallic ink

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  • Ludwig M. Solzen
    Lisa I assume you’re referring to my post in this newsgroup of February 27th, in which I explained the technique of dusting metallic powder on freshly
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 16, 2005
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      Lisa

      I assume you’re referring to my post in this newsgroup of February 27th, in
      which I explained the technique of dusting metallic powder on freshly
      printed ink. As you suggested I experienced quite successful results on
      smooth surfaced papers only (Simili Japon & Velin d’Arches 230g/m²). I
      suppose this goes for all metallic effects in general: the rougher the
      printed surface, the more the light diffuses, spoiling the sheen. With
      (hot/cold) foil stamping even rough paper is kind of smoothed down so that
      the gloss is assured.

      Using varnishes only fakes the gloss: not the metallic pigments give a shiny
      result, but the varnish does. I am not very fond of fake in fine
      letterpress; and foil stamping to me does have something kitschy…

      As I suggested earlier on, try polishing the metallic printed surface, be it
      a metallic ink, or dusted pigment. This is handwork, alright, and only
      advisable for (very) short runs. But I’m sure techniques could be found to
      burnish the printed sheets (the ink on it, that is) in a more timesaving
      manner. Perhaps ironing could do the job? I’m thinking of Baskerville’s
      heated copper cylinders… Just letting my fantasy loose. Give it at try, I’d
      say. And let us know.

      Maybe those bindery folks out here could help. Besides handy crafted gold
      work in leather: how do you manage your gilded lettering on linen textiles
      e.g.? I’m not speaking about those kitschy silk screen monstrosities of
      these day and age, but of the fine bindings of the 1930s–1950s. And could
      the technique be used on paper?

      By the way, I have a copy of “Der hundertste Geburtstag Ottmar
      Mergenthalers”, published 1954 by the Linotype GmbH. The booklet has a very
      nice cover, black vergé paper with a stylised linotype matrix, printed in
      gold. It’s beautifully shining, without any varnish kitsch. I’m not quite
      sure whether they used metallic ink or some sort of foil stamping. However,
      in those days foil stamping was offered optionally with the Heidelberg
      platens and cylinder presses, already. Probably that’s the way the did it,
      but it intrigues me how exactly in pre offset and varnish times they
      succeeded in crafting such splendid things.

      Ludwig
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