Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

C&P Pilot with Base

Expand Messages
  • mijayoga1
    Hi, I have a problem. I bought a Boxcar base from Boxcar Press but my rollers on my C&P pilot are hitting the entire base not just the image on the plate I
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 2, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi, I have a problem. I bought a Boxcar base from Boxcar Press but my
      rollers on my C&P pilot are hitting the entire base not just the image
      on the plate I put on it. Are rollers adjustable on a C&P pilot?

      What is the exact height measurement of furniture, leading, etc? It
      seems that the base is just a weeensy bit higher than the base of my
      type which I used to measure it against....

      Thanks
    • typetom@aol.com
      Hi, I tried to reply directly since I figured the answers I have are more for the direct questions than for the list, but it came back undeliverable. So I
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 3, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi,
        I tried to reply directly since I figured the answers I have are more for the
        direct questions than for the list, but it came back undeliverable. So I
        guess I'll send it to the whole list:

        Hi lalaura2@... (mijayoga1),
        Sounds to me like you may need a different base? I haven't tried the Boxcar
        base/system but I think they are for a shallower cut of polymer than I have
        been using. I use the steel backed polymer plate material from Gene Becker --
        there are several different thicknesses of plates available....

        But that doesn't answer your question about the Pilot. The roller contact
        height is not adjustable on the press except by adding masking tape to the
        tracks to raise them. On larger C&P presses you can get adjustable trucks
        (the little wheels the rollers ride on). Sometimes called MERTs for Morgan
        Expansion Roller Trucks, these are made of a rubber wheel, with a nut that
        can be tightened to squeeze the rubber into a different diameter. I don't
        think they ever made those for the Pilot, though. Fritz Klinke at NA Graphics
        (nagraph@... or 970-387-0212) sells the MERTs and replaceable rubber
        parts, so he would know.

        Only other possibility I can think is maybe you have the wrong size metal
        trucks on the press, maybe from a Kelsey press or some other small press. Do
        the rollers hit correctly when you use type? If so (within a bit of masking
        tape adjustment), it ought to work for polymers with a base. You can check
        the height of the polymer plus base against metal type by turning them all
        face down so the bottoms will give you close edges to compare by feel. Should
        all be type-high.

        Good luck figuring it out! Tom

        Tom Parson
        Now It's Up To You Publications
        157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
        (303) 777-8951
        http://members.aol.com/typetom
      • Harold Kyle
        ... How thin do you think the plates for the Boxcar Base are? The base we shipped to Laura had a thickness of 0.8734 inches, which means that the press s
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 3, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          On 3/3/02 2:18 PM, "typetom@..." <typetom@...> wrote:
          > Sounds to me like you may need a different base? I haven't tried the Boxcar
          > base/system but I think they are for a shallower cut of polymer than I have
          > been using. I use the steel backed polymer plate material from Gene Becker --
          > there are several different thicknesses of plates available....

          How thin do you think the plates for the Boxcar Base are?

          The base we shipped to Laura had a thickness of 0.8734 inches, which means
          that the press's rollers are at least 0.045 out of alignment.

          Although plastic-backed plates for the Boxcar Base may be slightly thinner
          than those that some printers use, it takes a press-wrenching impression to
          bottom out a 0.039 plate (whose face relief is 0.029). I find the detail on
          thinner plates is sharper because the washout times are reduced.

          Whatever Laura's press's problem, I'd venture the solution lies in adjusting
          the rail height with a roller gauge.

          Harold

          ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
          Boxcar Press
          Fine Printing and Binding ~ Digital Letterpress Supplies
          640 Fellows Avenue ~ Syracuse, NY 13210
          www.boxcarpress.com
          ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
        • David Goodrich
          Tom, I for one appreciated having your comments sent to the list as I too have been plagued by similar inking problems (for other reasons) on my Columbian No.
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 3, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            Tom,
            I for one appreciated having your comments sent to the list as I too have
            been plagued by similar inking problems (for other reasons) on my Columbian
            No. 2.

            The height of the printing surface over the shoulder of a photopolymer plate
            is much less than with type so that roller bulge can ink the shoulder very
            easily. The real answer is probably a harder roller but few of us are going
            to have a selection to choose from. The alternative is to raise the roller
            above its normal level for type. NA Graphics sells a special tape to apply
            to roller tracks for this purpose. I believe it is intended to be permanent
            so not a good answer if you plan to revert to printing from type. I have
            raised rollers by taping strips of cardboard to the tracks with black
            electrical tape. Masking tape is pretty thin and has an irregular surface
            so I would not think it would be as good.

            You might also want to consider some sort of roller bearers locked into your
            chase. 18 point brass rule is usually recommended but wood rule or
            miscellaneous wood border or even type would work. I have resorted to this
            because my tracks are badly worn. The bearers also may need to be raised.
            I would suggest using a cardstock underlay.

            I am in process of working out a similar roller bulge problem working with
            photopolymer plates on my handpress and will report back when I have reached
            a satisfactory solution. My initial finding has been that type-high roller
            bearers result in the roller bulge inking the shoulder of the plates.

            David



            -----Original Message----
            From: typetom@... [mailto:typetom@...]
            Sent: Sunday, March 03, 2002 2:18 PM
            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] C&P Pilot with Base


            Hi,
            I tried to reply directly since I figured the answers I have are more for
            the
            direct questions than for the list, but it came back undeliverable. So I
            guess I'll send it to the whole list:

            Hi lalaura2@... (mijayoga1),
            Sounds to me like you may need a different base? I haven't tried the Boxcar
            base/system but I think they are for a shallower cut of polymer than I have
            been using. I use the steel backed polymer plate material from Gene
            Becker --
            there are several different thicknesses of plates available....

            But that doesn't answer your question about the Pilot. The roller contact
            height is not adjustable on the press except by adding masking tape to the
            tracks to raise them. On larger C&P presses you can get adjustable trucks
            (the little wheels the rollers ride on). Sometimes called MERTs for Morgan
            Expansion Roller Trucks, these are made of a rubber wheel, with a nut that
            can be tightened to squeeze the rubber into a different diameter. I don't
            think they ever made those for the Pilot, though. Fritz Klinke at NA
            Graphics
            (nagraph@... or 970-387-0212) sells the MERTs and replaceable
            rubber
            parts, so he would know.

            Only other possibility I can think is maybe you have the wrong size metal
            trucks on the press, maybe from a Kelsey press or some other small press. Do
            the rollers hit correctly when you use type? If so (within a bit of masking
            tape adjustment), it ought to work for polymers with a base. You can check
            the height of the polymer plus base against metal type by turning them all
            face down so the bottoms will give you close edges to compare by feel.
            Should
            all be type-high.

            Good luck figuring it out! Tom

            Tom Parson
            Now It's Up To You Publications
            157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
            (303) 777-8951
            http://members.aol.com/typetom


            To respond to this message or post a message to the membership:
            PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com

            Encountering problems?
            PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Fritz Klinke
            The tape we sell for raising the rail height is removable, but it is a hard plastic with a very effective adhesive so that the tape will not deform as will
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 3, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              The tape we sell for raising the rail height is removable, but it is a hard
              plastic with a very effective adhesive so that the tape will not deform as
              will masking tape or electrician's tape, both of which are stop-gap measures
              at best. The bed rails have to be clean and free of oil and grease.

              I personally think, that besides having the bed rails in the correct height
              ratio to the rollers to be at type high, assuming the material being printed
              is also type high, that the condition of the inking rollers is most
              critical. We have rollers from platens, cylinders, Vandercooks coming in our
              shop on a daily basis. It appears that most printers run their rollers into
              the ground before they accept the fact that the roller is shot and has to be
              replaced. We furnish new cores on most of the platen press rollers except
              Kluge and Heidelberg, as new cores are straight and true, and used ones tend
              to be warped. This is picked up on the finishing equipment in a roller shop
              where the final grind is done on what is essentially a lathe, and rollers to
              be true have to have concentric cores. Rollers swell, shrink, and do all
              sorts of things over their life span, all of which is affected by the type
              of solvent used, the size and type of material being inked, temperature in
              the shop, press speed, etc.

              Fritz Klinke, NA Graphics
              1314 Greene Street, P.O. Box 467
              Silverton, Colorado 81433 USA
              970-387-0212, fax 970-387-0127
              nagraph@...

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "David Goodrich" <davidgoodrich@...>
              To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, March 03, 2002 2:16 PM
              Subject: RE: [PPLetterpress] C&P Pilot with Base


              > Tom,
              > I for one appreciated having your comments sent to the list as I too have
              > been plagued by similar inking problems (for other reasons) on my
              Columbian
              > No. 2.
              >
              > The height of the printing surface over the shoulder of a photopolymer
              plate
              > is much less than with type so that roller bulge can ink the shoulder very
              > easily. The real answer is probably a harder roller but few of us are
              going
              > to have a selection to choose from. The alternative is to raise the
              roller
              > above its normal level for type. NA Graphics sells a special tape to
              apply
              > to roller tracks for this purpose. I believe it is intended to be
              permanent
              > so not a good answer if you plan to revert to printing from type. I have
              > raised rollers by taping strips of cardboard to the tracks with black
              > electrical tape. Masking tape is pretty thin and has an irregular surface
              > so I would not think it would be as good.
            • Silver MayKitten
              I have two heights of Lexan base; .850 for my plastic based .065 mylar backed plates, and .750 for my metal backed .165 plates. An allowance of .003 is
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 4, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                I have two heights of Lexan base; .850" for my plastic based .065"
                mylar backed plates, and .750" for my metal backed .165" plates. An
                allowance of .003" is made for the mounting tape.

                Furniture is usually .625 or 16 MM high; slugs and leads being two
                heights, low and ludlow, the measurements of which excape me at the
                moment.

                SMK
                --- mijayoga1 <lalaura2@...> wrote:
                > Hi, I have a problem. I bought a Boxcar base from Boxcar Press but
                > my
                > rollers on my C&P pilot are hitting the entire base not just the
                > image
                > on the plate I put on it. Are rollers adjustable on a C&P pilot?
                >
                > What is the exact height measurement of furniture, leading, etc? It
                > seems that the base is just a weeensy bit higher than the base of my
                > type which I used to measure it against....
                >
                > Thanks
                >
                >
                >


                =====
                Pagan, Pagan, what are you finding?
                Yours is the road that winds lonely and far,
                Strange are the shadows that round you come creeping,
                Still through the clouds is the glint of a star!

                From the book, Charge of the Goddess
                BY: Doreen Valiente

                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Yahoo! Sports - sign up for Fantasy Baseball
                http://sports.yahoo.com
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.