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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Galley rack & trays available for $50

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  • Fritz Klinke
    Using the correct terminology sure helps when it comes time to order parts, pieces and tid bits of printing material. We had a request for a bale arm the other
    Message 1 of 34 , Apr 1, 2005
      Using the correct terminology sure helps when it comes time to order parts,
      pieces and tid bits of printing material. We had a request for a bale arm the
      other day for a 10x15 C&P. Now for Gerald's sake, C&Ps have been around now for
      about 115 years and span a time period where the "traditional terminology" of
      say 1895 is still relevant in 2005. There is no such thing as a bale arm, but
      that's what the folks at a very respected letterpress house called this part on
      their press. And to their surprise, what they were after is called a gripper. We
      spent time on a couple of phone calls and an inquiry to a supplier for what I
      thought they wanted, only to find out what they really wanted. There are names
      for things, and part numbers, and other references, and when I get calls from
      amateurs who are vague about terminology, well, then that's one thing, but from
      people who have been at it for years and haven't taken the time, effort, or
      pride in their craft to know what the time-honored terms and phrases are, then I
      have a hard time with that. We all make mistakes, and hopefully we are all still
      learning. The major misnamed thing around here is the office cat, Elrod.

      Fritz


      > When I was learning how to sail, and then when i was teaching other how
      > to sail, the question came up: why does everything have a silly little
      > name? There are no ropes on a boat, there are lines, sheets, halyards,
      > etc. The reason for this is - when you are sailing the difference
      > between this rope and that rope over there can be the difference
      > between life and death. So clear, exact, and concise communication is
      > very important - so you need a million names for everything.
      >
      > I imagine that industrial letterpress shops were the same way - with
      > quite heavy forms, dangerous presses and guillotines, etc.
      >
      > that being said, i don't think many of us face life or death in the
      > pressroom. even though I try to use all of the correct terminology, and
      > learn as much as i can, it seems like in a few years it will only be
      > important to historians and museums. These terms might die off like the
      > terms associated with common presses (does anyone using a vandercook
      > know the name of the string that a tympan/frisket rests on?) In the
      > same direction, I wonder if there are whole lexicons associated with
      > commercial lithography, etching, engraving, etc. that have been
      > completely lost today.
      >
      > disclaimer - i don't really have an opinion one way or the other, so i
      > don't want to start a fight, these are just some thoughts i had
      >
      > thanks,
      > alex
      > press eight-seventeen
      > lexington, ky
      >
      >
      > > Termology helps to communicate, but only between typographers, if
      > > it's deteriorating to a sort of "latin-speach between doctores
      > > medici".
      > > Than newcomers will have a hard time indeed.
      > >
      > > Language is for communicating, the internet we use too.
      >
    • Fritz Klinke
      I don t pretend to be computer literate and am not cognizant of all the phraseology of the computer world, but this discussion was about people who are working
      Message 34 of 34 , Apr 6, 2005
        I don't pretend to be computer literate and am not cognizant of all the
        phraseology of the computer world, but this discussion was about people who are
        working in letterpress not using commonly understood traditional letterpress
        terms. Should I ever venture into a computer discussion group, I would expect to
        either know the language or to learn it pretty damn fast. I encountered the case
        terms in the process of installing an Intuit product last night, and the little
        box thing (I know, dialog box) did not have a technical description of what the
        people who inhabit the halls and closets of Intuit call all the bits and pieces
        of their product.

        Fritz

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, April 06, 2005 4:24 PM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Galley rack & trays available for $50





        "password thing" :-)

        Since we seem to be so very concerned about proper terminology, I
        believe the correct term for an encryption process program interface
        is "password generator."

        Gerald

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Fritz Klinke" <nagraph@f...> wrote:
        > Even the computer people get "it"--passwords can be "case"
        sensitive, as in
        > uppercase or lowercase. I've yet to see a password thing say a
        password was
        > "drawer" sensitive, so I would think those folks who are computer
        literate can
        > make the leap from passwords to type. Or am I assuming too much?
        >
        > Fritz
        >










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