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Heidelberg Windmill

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  • thornvilla
    Hi, I have a 10 x 15 heidelberg windmill which i have to move, and will have to remove the front section in order to get it through a doorway. Does anyone
    Message 1 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
      Hi,

      I have a 10" x 15" heidelberg windmill which i have to move, and
      will have to remove the front section in order to get it through a
      doorway.
      Does anyone have experience with dismantling (and reassembling)
      these? Is this a job best left to the professionals?

      Thanks in advance for and tips or advice you may be willing to offer

      regards,

      Dane
    • Regis Graden
      Dane, The only safe and sane way to move a press such as this is a professional machinery mover. One slip by an amateur and the press is destroyed and someone
      Message 2 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
        Dane,

        The only safe and sane way to move a press such as this is a professional machinery mover.

        One slip by an amateur and the press is destroyed and someone can get really hurt.

        Sincerely,

        Regis

        thornvilla <dane@...> wrote:


        Hi,

        I have a 10" x 15" heidelberg windmill which i have to move, and
        will have to remove the front section in order to get it through a
        doorway.
        Does anyone have experience with dismantling (and reassembling)
        these? Is this a job best left to the professionals?

        Thanks in advance for and tips or advice you may be willing to offer

        regards,

        Dane







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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Daniel Petrzelka
        I think people need to be careful about suggesting the only way to move things. I agree that a professional mover is a wonderful way to move large presses
        Message 3 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
          I think people need to be careful about suggesting the "only" way to
          move things.

          I agree that a professional mover is a wonderful way to move large
          presses and machinery. Though I've also heard horror stories of
          underinsured movers, who don't respect the value of a great press, and
          have done irreparable damage.

          Most people can learn to move stuff, if they are patient, diligent, and
          methodical. I've moved my 12x18 C&Ps, Elrods and my Hacker around my
          studio by myself, and loaded a Linotype onto a trailer with only two
          people.

          Small rollers, 1.25" diameter work wonders for rolling big presses
          around, and at that height, there is little chance of tipping them
          over. Using a good long (Snap-on) pry bar, and a few 1" thick blocks
          its fairly easy to get a press off the ground-- if it does not have a
          flat bottom (I can't think of many that do) you must get it up onto 4x4
          skids. 45 the ends of the skids to make it easier to get rollers under
          them, and bolt the press to them with nice big lag bolts.
          Two people can make quick work of a press this way.

          I would suggest that if any of this does not make sense-- do as
          suggested earlier, and HIRE a MOVER.

          GETTING A PRESS ONTO A TRAILER IS NOT AN EASY OR SAFE PROCEDURE (it can
          be if you know what you are doing)-- if you have to move the press very
          far, and don't have a loading dock, get some help from someone with
          experience.

          Moving is not for everyone, I just want to provide a counterpoint to
          those who would have us all hire movers.

          The only steadfast rule I can think of regarding press moving-- is
          never try to stop a falling press, never.


          Daniel Petrzelka
          I've been accused of being an overzealous, and impatient "kid." I
          cannot argue with that-- I'm 23, quite impatient, and successfully, and
          safely done many things I've been told could not be done.

          Moving a 30" C&P paper cutter, from the third floor of a church in
          Seattle this coming weekend-- that will be interesting. How'd they get
          it up there?
        • chuck sumner
          I had spoken to Norman Hicks about this once, and he has experience in dismantling windmills to move through doorways. Might be worth a call.
          Message 4 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
            I had spoken to Norman Hicks about this once, and he has experience in
            dismantling windmills to move through doorways.
            Might be worth a call.

            http://printingequip.com/


            On Feb 24, 2005, at 12:58 PM, thornvilla wrote:

            >
            >
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > I have a 10" x 15" heidelberg windmill which i have to move, and
            > will have to remove the front section in order to get it through a
            > doorway.
            > Does anyone have experience with dismantling (and reassembling)
            > these? Is this a job best left to the professionals?
            >
            > Thanks in advance for and tips or advice you may be willing to offer
            >
            > regards,
            >
            > Dane
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >

            ---

            tshirts for killing yourself to
            http://www.2inches.com
          • Vinayaga Prabhu
            Hi there, You can remove the front section easily.But you need two persons.Please try this ONLY IF YOU KNOW ABOUT DISMANTLING HEIDELBERG PLATEN.There are four
            Message 5 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
              Hi there,
              You can remove the front section easily.But
              you need two persons.Please try this ONLY IF YOU KNOW
              ABOUT DISMANTLING HEIDELBERG PLATEN.There are four
              nuts under the front section which also has 2 steady
              pins(you can see this easily,its a threaded portion
              protruding out).If you remove these, the front portion
              can be completely removed along with the feeder and
              delivery.Its is better and afe to remove the feeder
              and delivery parts before removing the front part.If
              you know much about heidelberg platen,then go on.Or
              else better go for professionals.I have one 10 x 15
              platen, and three 13 x 18 platens.Out of these four we
              have removed and fitted the front part for two
              machines which includes one 10 x 15 and one 13 x
              18.Any doudts regarding dismantling, call me at
              00-91-9843066429.

              Regards,
              Prabhu



              Hi,

              I have a 10" x 15" heidelberg windmill which i have to
              move, and
              will have to remove the front section in order to get
              it through a
              doorway.
              Does anyone have experience with dismantling (and
              reassembling)
              these? Is this a job best left to the professionals?

              Thanks in advance for and tips or advice you may be
              willing to offer

              regards,

              Dane







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            • Gerald Lange
              Daniel I understand the counterpoint, I ve moved a lot of presses in my earlier years, and I guess I did so to save money, and because it seemed easy enough to
              Message 6 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
                Daniel

                I understand the counterpoint, I've moved a lot of presses in my
                earlier years, and I guess I did so to save money, and because it
                seemed easy enough to do. After a point though, I learned to trust an
                experienced press mover and felt the money spent quite worth it.

                I've never seen anyone get hurt or have a press completely destroyed
                but if I think about it long enough some horrible near misses do
                surface in my memory. A lift gate that kicked out unexpectedly and
                missed an apprentice's face by inches, a press that could have placed
                on someones foot had she not moved it in the nick of time, an
                inexperienced forklift operator who jerked the controls (while I was
                checking out the placement of the forks) and dropped the press.

                Presses can be repaired or junked, no big deal. But an injury to a
                helper is something that you would not want to live with. An injury to
                yourself could put you out of the letterpress biz completely.

                Folks will move presses by themselves out of necessity, but the "best"
                advice is, don't do it yourself.

                Gerald

                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Daniel Petrzelka <petrzed@c...>
                wrote:
                > I think people need to be careful about suggesting the "only" way to
                > move things.
                >
                > I agree that a professional mover is a wonderful way to move large
                > presses and machinery. Though I've also heard horror stories of
                > underinsured movers, who don't respect the value of a great press, and
                > have done irreparable damage.
                >
                > Most people can learn to move stuff, if they are patient, diligent, and
                > methodical. I've moved my 12x18 C&Ps, Elrods and my Hacker around my
                > studio by myself, and loaded a Linotype onto a trailer with only two
                > people.
                >
                > Small rollers, 1.25" diameter work wonders for rolling big presses
                > around, and at that height, there is little chance of tipping them
                > over. Using a good long (Snap-on) pry bar, and a few 1" thick blocks
                > its fairly easy to get a press off the ground-- if it does not have a
                > flat bottom (I can't think of many that do) you must get it up onto 4x4
                > skids. 45 the ends of the skids to make it easier to get rollers under
                > them, and bolt the press to them with nice big lag bolts.
                > Two people can make quick work of a press this way.
                >
                > I would suggest that if any of this does not make sense-- do as
                > suggested earlier, and HIRE a MOVER.
                >
                > GETTING A PRESS ONTO A TRAILER IS NOT AN EASY OR SAFE PROCEDURE (it can
                > be if you know what you are doing)-- if you have to move the press very
                > far, and don't have a loading dock, get some help from someone with
                > experience.
                >
                > Moving is not for everyone, I just want to provide a counterpoint to
                > those who would have us all hire movers.
                >
                > The only steadfast rule I can think of regarding press moving-- is
                > never try to stop a falling press, never.
                >
                >
                > Daniel Petrzelka
                > I've been accused of being an overzealous, and impatient "kid." I
                > cannot argue with that-- I'm 23, quite impatient, and successfully, and
                > safely done many things I've been told could not be done.
                >
                > Moving a 30" C&P paper cutter, from the third floor of a church in
                > Seattle this coming weekend-- that will be interesting. How'd they get
                > it up there?
              • Daniel Petrzelka
                Gerald, touche ... I agree with your suggestions completely. Daniel P.
                Message 7 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
                  Gerald,

                  touche' ...

                  I agree with your suggestions completely.

                  Daniel P.
                • Joel at D.L.
                  Not to belabor the counterpoints, but having watched the Hicks Bros. move my windmill the first time, I felt confident enough to move it myself the second
                  Message 8 of 20 , Feb 24, 2005
                    Not to belabor the counterpoints, but having watched the Hicks Bros.
                    move my windmill the first time, I felt confident enough to move it
                    myself the second time. Windmills have those nice holes in the base
                    casting, and if you have the right steel rods to slip through them and a
                    couple of pallet jacks it is very easy to pick them up and get them on a
                    pallet.

                    Taking it apart now, that's something else entirely. I might take it
                    apart, but I'd be inclined to have a professional put it back together
                    for me. At least the first time.

                    Joel
                  • mike.jacobs
                    Dane, I know the problem exactly. When my Windmill was delivered the Hi-Ab could only reach half way down the drive. I had to move the press about 20 yards
                    Message 9 of 20 , Feb 25, 2005
                      Dane,
                      I know the problem exactly. When my Windmill was delivered the Hi-Ab could
                      only reach half way down the drive. I had to move the press about 20 yards
                      down the rest of the drive, up six steps, round a corner, down six steps and
                      through a door that was too narrow.
                      Since the door was obviously going to necessitate some dismantling I started
                      by removing the front table complete with the feed and deliver, that was
                      after removing everything obviously removable.
                      Then with one inch water pipes, a crow bar and some concrete blocks the
                      machine was inched along on its journey.
                      The main lesson I learned was that the windmill itself is set very
                      accurately. I thought it a good idea to remove the windmill arms as they
                      looked particularly vulnerable. This proved to be a mistake as they had been
                      accurately adjusted with tiny shims and pieces of card inserted
                      strategically to ensure that printing in register was accurate on both arms.
                      It took forever to get it adjusted back again.

                      If you are fairly confident, have the muscle power (I used a wife and a cat)
                      and you go about it methodically then it can be done.
                      I have helped move a number of machines including a Titan, an Intertype,
                      several Arabs and some strange animals called offsets. By moved I mean moved
                      along the ground not lifted into a truck and transported several miles,
                      although I have done that too.

                      Take you time and give it a go.
                      Mike at the Cockleshell Press, England
                    • Ludwig M. Solzen
                      I face the same problem, but it is even more challenging, since besides the Platen 10×15 I will have to move a Heidelberg Cylinder Press 15×22½ as well...
                      Message 10 of 20 , Feb 25, 2005
                        I face the same problem, but it is even more challenging, since besides the
                        Platen 10×15 I will have to move a Heidelberg Cylinder Press 15×22½ as
                        well...

                        Because the moving involves two machines, including one that huge and heavy
                        to be transported for quite some miles, I see myself necessarily forced to
                        hire a professional mover. I learned that the charges are not that
                        expensive, considering the value of the machines.

                        One main advantage to mention, however, is that a professional mover can put
                        the machines directly into the right place, fix them and make the needed
                        adjustments that after a move are required. Like a professional tunes a
                        piano once it found its new home, you could say.

                        Still, one question that disturbs me: the Cylinder Press weighs 10,350 lbs
                        (3,300 kilos). Does anyone know if the cement flour of an ordinary garage is
                        fitted to take a burden that heavy?

                        Regards,

                        Ludwig



                        ________________________________________
                        Van: thornvilla [mailto:dane@...]
                        Verzonden: donderdag 24 februari 2005 21:58
                        Aan: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                        Onderwerp: [PPLetterpress] Heidelberg Windmill



                        Hi,

                        I have a 10" x 15" heidelberg windmill which i have to move, and
                        will have to remove the front section in order to get it through a
                        doorway.
                        Does anyone have experience with dismantling (and reassembling)
                        these? Is this a job best left to the professionals?

                        Thanks in advance for and tips or advice you may be willing to offer

                        regards,

                        Dane








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                      • typetom@aol.com
                        Sometimes it s easier/better to remove a door frame, and re-plaster and paint, than to take a complex machine apart. Tom [Non-text portions of this message
                        Message 11 of 20 , Feb 25, 2005
                          Sometimes it's easier/better to remove a door frame, and re-plaster and
                          paint, than to take a complex machine apart.

                          Tom


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Michael T. Metz
                          Or, pay someone to redo the door than to pay someone to rebuild your press. ... From: typetom@aol.com [mailto:typetom@aol.com] Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005
                          Message 12 of 20 , Feb 25, 2005
                            Or, pay someone to redo the door than to pay someone
                            to rebuild your press.

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: typetom@... [mailto:typetom@...]
                            Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 9:20 AM
                            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Heidelberg Windmill



                            Sometimes it's easier/better to remove a door frame, and re-plaster and
                            paint, than to take a complex machine apart.

                            Tom


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                            Yahoo! Groups Links
                          • Peter Fraterdeus
                            ... Or your leg... P ... -- AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@ Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com
                            Message 13 of 20 , Feb 25, 2005
                              At 10:34 AM -0600 2/25/05, Michael T. Metz wrote:
                              >Or, pay someone to redo the door than to pay someone
                              >to rebuild your press.

                              Or your leg...

                              P

                              >
                              >-----Original Message-----
                              >From: typetom@... [mailto:typetom@...]
                              >Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 9:20 AM
                              >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                              >Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Heidelberg Windmill
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >Sometimes it's easier/better to remove a door frame, and re-plaster and
                              >paint, than to take a complex machine apart.
                              >
                              >Tom

                              --
                              AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@

                              Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com http://www.galenaphotos.com

                              http://www.semiotx.com Web Strategy Consulting
                              "Words that work."(tm) Communication Design and Typography
                            • Gary Mordhorst
                              Be careful. It sounds real simple, just tear out some plaster and rebuild the doorway.... Building construction has elements over doorways and windows to
                              Message 14 of 20 , Feb 25, 2005
                                Be careful. It sounds real simple, just tear out some plaster and
                                rebuild the doorway.... Building construction has elements over
                                doorways and windows to provide support of the structure, referred to
                                as system of headers and cripples. Just cutting one of these out can
                                weaken the structure of your building.

                                Get your tape measure out and see what space your door way allows.
                                Then measure your press. If there is a size issue, see what
                                "extraneous" press features can be easily removed, with out a major
                                tear down and rebuild. If a couple if inches is the problem, and you
                                are okay with the possibility of having to replace the door and frame,
                                go ahead and tear the door and frame out. I say tear, because
                                typically the wood of a door frame becomes brittle over time and most
                                likely will split and break as it is removed.

                                Please, no not alter the frame work of your building.

                                Best of luck,

                                Gary Mordhorst
                                AccuColor Plus, Inc.
                              • Daniel Petrzelka
                                Are there any non-commercial printers on this list using Heidelberg Windmill platen plresses? (ie hobbists) I would be interested in excahnging email with
                                Message 15 of 20 , Jun 16, 2005
                                  Are there any non-commercial printers on this list using Heidelberg Windmill platen
                                  plresses? (ie hobbists)

                                  I would be interested in excahnging email with someone running one of these
                                  presses, as I may be getting one, and have a few questions.


                                  thank you
                                  Daniel P.
                                • Ludwig M. Solzen
                                  Dear Sir, As a matter of fact, I am just starting as a printer using photopolymers to print digital lay-out on a traditional letterpress. And it is a
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Jun 16, 2005
                                    Dear Sir,

                                    As a matter of fact, I am just starting as a printer using photopolymers to
                                    print digital lay-out on a traditional letterpress. And it is a Heidelberg
                                    platen, indeed. To be precise it's a 26×38 cm (i.e. 10×15 inches), from
                                    around 1970 and in quite good condition.

                                    I bought the press from an old retiring printer, who until recently still
                                    used it for printing business cards and occasional work. Besides the
                                    windmill he also had a Heidelberg cylinderpress KSB 40×57 cm, which for
                                    several years was used only for diecutting. As far as I can observe the
                                    press is however in excellent condition for printing as well. It came, for
                                    example, with 6 new rollers, still packed in the original Heidelberg
                                    wrappers! So, I bought this one as well...

                                    Now, the cylinder is still in stock, but our windmill was delivered last
                                    week. We are still look-king for an appropriate location for both presses,
                                    since our garage will soon prove to be a bit too narrow, I guess.

                                    This week I experimented with our Polimero A4 and made some first
                                    photopolymer clichés, to be printed on the windmill. The machine, though, is
                                    not attached yet to the electrical circuit, for this turned out to be
                                    somewhat more difficult than I expected. I hope that we will have the
                                    windmill running still this month.

                                    I am the editor of a literary art magazine, based in Flanders (Belgium), in
                                    the city of Leuven, known for its university, where I am employed as a
                                    researcher in the field of the history of art. Being inexperienced young
                                    bachelor students at the time, we started the magazine about seven years
                                    ago, and since than went through a lot of troubles with local printers.
                                    Walking through the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp, as a kid already, I
                                    dreamt of becoming one day such a humanist printer-publisher. So, we decided
                                    not to spill our money any longer to the professional amateurs, but to
                                    acquire instead our own press. Publishing art, poetry and philosophy I'd not
                                    call a "hobby", but it is clear to me that one can't make a living of it.
                                    And neither will the actual production on press of our literary books become
                                    ever very lucrative. I thus hope to do some more commercial work as well, so
                                    that we may be able to maintain this very expensive "vocation" of ours. For
                                    more information on the magazine you are kindly invited to visit our website
                                    on www.van-nu-en-straks.be.

                                    As soon as we'll have a proper website for our printing 'Officina', I'd be
                                    pleased to show you some pictures from our presses and press work.

                                    I'm looking foreward to exchange ideas and experiences with you on working
                                    with the Heidelberger!

                                    Kind regards,

                                    Ludwig

                                    ________________________________________
                                    Van: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com]
                                    Namens Daniel Petrzelka
                                    Verzonden: donderdag 16 juni 2005 9:18
                                    Aan: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                    Onderwerp: [PPLetterpress] Heidelberg Windmill

                                    Are there any non-commercial printers on this list using Heidelberg Windmill
                                    platen
                                    plresses? (ie hobbists)

                                    I would be interested in excahnging email with someone running one of these
                                    presses, as I may be getting one, and have a few questions.


                                    thank you
                                       Daniel P.
                                  • chuck sumner
                                    I just picked up one myself, and just got it set up, powered, etc.. I ve yet to run an actual job with it, but that is very soon coming. I d be glad to
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jun 16, 2005
                                      I just picked up one myself, and just got it set up, powered, etc..

                                      I've yet to run an actual job with it, but that is very soon coming.

                                      I'd be glad to exchange whatever as well.

                                      Chuck

                                      On Jun 16, 2005, at 12:17 AM, Daniel Petrzelka wrote:

                                      > Are there any non-commercial printers on this list using Heidelberg
                                      > Windmill platen
                                      > plresses? (ie hobbists)
                                      >
                                      > I would be interested in excahnging email with someone running one
                                      > of these
                                      > presses, as I may be getting one, and have a few questions.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > thank you
                                      > Daniel P.
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                    • Vinayaga Prabhu
                                      Hello there, Any details and doubts regarding the HEIDELBERG WINDMILL (both 10x15 and 12x18),you are most welcome.I have 3 GTs and T model.I m doing
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Jun 26, 2005
                                        Hello there,
                                        Any details and doubts regarding the
                                        HEIDELBERG WINDMILL (both 10x15 and 12x18),you are
                                        most welcome.I have 3 GTs and T model.I'm doing
                                        printing,embossing and hot stampfoiling on these
                                        machines.

                                        REGARDS,
                                        R.Prabhu




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                                      • elumdesigns
                                        We use them exclusively. ... Windmill platen ... of these
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Jul 12, 2005
                                          We use them exclusively.

                                          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Petrzelka"
                                          <petrzed@c...> wrote:
                                          > Are there any non-commercial printers on this list using Heidelberg
                                          Windmill platen
                                          > plresses? (ie hobbists)
                                          >
                                          > I would be interested in excahnging email with someone running one
                                          of these
                                          > presses, as I may be getting one, and have a few questions.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > thank you
                                          > Daniel P.
                                        • Vinayaga Prabhu
                                          Hi there, I m a commercial printer and a hobbyist for Heidelberg Windmill.You can contact me for any details. Regards, Prabhu mobil ;- 00-91-9843066429
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Jul 13, 2005
                                            Hi there,
                                            I'm a commercial printer and a hobbyist for
                                            Heidelberg Windmill.You can contact me for any
                                            details.


                                            Regards,
                                            Prabhu
                                            mobil ;- 00-91-9843066429



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