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Re: [PPLetterpress] Printing troubles?

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  • philip gallo
    I ve been running full reverse plates as large as 11x14 using Daniel Smith Velvet Black #65, with the addition of Setswell Compound, a flow agent, also
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 10 4:35 PM
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      I've been running full reverse plates as large as 11x14 using Daniel Smith
      Velvet Black #65,
      with the addition of Setswell Compound, a flow agent, also available from
      Daniel Smith.
      The standard formulation calls for not more than ten-percent additive to the
      ink.

      I've been printing Rives BFK, Arches Cover, Somerset Velvet and Lana Lin de Pur
      dampened
      from linoleum blocks, 1/4-inch magnesium plates, as well as polymer.

      I sometimes hit them twice, but generally speaking not. I am running these on a
      Universal III,
      and it does require re-inking after each impression. I also pre-ink at least
      once, sometimes twice.

      Fine detail in the reverse causes severe problems, and would call for less
      dampening and
      somewhat less Setswell Compound. If you insist on such fine detail, you might
      try printing
      out on newsprint after each impression to clean the plate from excess ink.

      The full reverse requires a great deal of impression; sufficient that it might
      require
      an initial two-handed crank.

      All best

      Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press






      Katie Harper wrote:

      > Just had a workshop group of folks printing from polymer plates, with mixed
      > results. In most cases, when folks proofed on coated stock, they'd like what
      > they'd see and then when they tried to print on the run stock (usually
      > uncoated, ranging from Rives printmaking paper to card stock), almost all
      > were disappointed with the results. Even wetting the Rives slightly didn't
      > seem to give us a richer black in the larger solids.
      >
      > In some cases, what was being asked of the process was a bit impossible.
      > Fine detail in some areas with good blacks in the large solid areas. Plates
      > that contained both were especially problematic. However, I think that we
      > should have had a bit more satisfaction than we did.
      >
      > I attributed some of the dissatisfaction on the uncoated stock to the wrong
      > ink. We used Inmont Midnight Black, an ink I inherited with a load of
      > letterpress equipment last summer. It has worked quite nicely in the past
      > with type, but doesn't seem to do well with images, especially with larger
      > solids on uncoated stock. I think that some of the problems also might have
      > been due to some bad rollers on a "new" Vandercook that I recently got. The
      > rollers are smooth enough, but I suspect they have grown hard over the
      > years, perhaps leading to the obvious roller slur that we got.
      >
      > I know there has been some discussion about inks on this list in the past,
      > and I'm going to be ordering some "real" letterpress black ink; but I'm
      > wondering if any letterpress ink is capable of doing what I mention above:
      > give good blacks and yet hold fine detail on uncoated stocks.
      >
      > Any suggestions appreciated.
      >
      > Katie Harper
      > Ars Brevis Press
      > Cincinnati, OH
      > 513-233-9588
      >
      >
      > To post a message to the membership, send an email to
      > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
      > http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
      > [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
      > Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
      >
      > Encountering problems? send an email to
      > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > To unsubscribe, send an email to
      > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    • Gaylord Schanilec
      I think printing large solids with fine detail on a Vandercook (or any press) requires alot of finicky putzing--probably more than could be done in a classroom
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 10 7:06 PM
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        I think printing large solids with fine detail on a Vandercook (or any press)
        requires alot of finicky putzing--probably more than could be done in a
        classroom situation. It requires a proper method, involving inking and cleaning
        the plate. This can take hours, even days to realize. A basic problem in
        printing such a combination on the Vandercook is the press's inherent lack of
        ink control due to the ink being applied to the rollers periodically by hand, as
        opposed to an ink fountain. Every X number of impressions (sometimes one), ink
        must be added, and every X number of impressions (sometimes one), the plate must
        be cleaned, and there are varring degrees of cleaning the plate. For instance,
        it may need cleaning with a dry rag every two impressions, and then a thorough
        cleaning with type wash and a brush every five impressions. (Is typewash okay
        with polymer plates?) All of this leads to an inevitable inconsistancy from
        impression to impression. The trick is getting enough consistancy that you are
        the only one who knows. And one day, sometimes years later, you can look at it
        objectivly and think, "It really didn't turn out all that bad". Gaylor.d
        Schanilec

        Katie Harper wrote:

        > Just had a workshop group of folks printing from polymer plates, with mixed
        > results. In most cases, when folks proofed on coated stock, they'd like what
        > they'd see and then when they tried to print on the run stock (usually
        > uncoated, ranging from Rives printmaking paper to card stock), almost all
        > were disappointed with the results. Even wetting the Rives slightly didn't
        > seem to give us a richer black in the larger solids.
        >
        > In some cases, what was being asked of the process was a bit impossible.
        > Fine detail in some areas with good blacks in the large solid areas. Plates
        > that contained both were especially problematic. However, I think that we
        > should have had a bit more satisfaction than we did.
        >
        > I attributed some of the dissatisfaction on the uncoated stock to the wrong
        > ink. We used Inmont Midnight Black, an ink I inherited with a load of
        > letterpress equipment last summer. It has worked quite nicely in the past
        > with type, but doesn't seem to do well with images, especially with larger
        > solids on uncoated stock. I think that some of the problems also might have
        > been due to some bad rollers on a "new" Vandercook that I recently got. The
        > rollers are smooth enough, but I suspect they have grown hard over the
        > years, perhaps leading to the obvious roller slur that we got.
        >
        > I know there has been some discussion about inks on this list in the past,
        > and I'm going to be ordering some "real" letterpress black ink; but I'm
        > wondering if any letterpress ink is capable of doing what I mention above:
        > give good blacks and yet hold fine detail on uncoated stocks.
        >
        > Any suggestions appreciated.
        >
        > Katie Harper
        > Ars Brevis Press
        > Cincinnati, OH
        > 513-233-9588
        >
        >
        > To post a message to the membership, send an email to
        > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
        > http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
        > [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
        > Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
        >
        > Encountering problems? send an email to
        > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > To unsubscribe, send an email to
        > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marnie Powers-Torrey
        Katie and Philip- I ve been out of town for a month and apologize for the tardiness of my question. In the discussion below, are you referring to printing
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 27 12:13 PM
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          Katie and Philip-

          I've been out of town for a month and apologize for the tardiness of my
          question. In the discussion below, are you referring to printing
          intaglio on a letterpress when you speak of printing "full reverse"?

          Marnie

          -----Original Message-----
          From: philip gallo [mailto:phil@...]
          Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2002 5:36 PM
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Printing troubles?


          I've been running full reverse plates as large as 11x14 using Daniel
          Smith
          Velvet Black #65,
          with the addition of Setswell Compound, a flow agent, also available
          from
          Daniel Smith.
          The standard formulation calls for not more than ten-percent additive to
          the
          ink.

          I've been printing Rives BFK, Arches Cover, Somerset Velvet and Lana Lin
          de Pur
          dampened
          from linoleum blocks, 1/4-inch magnesium plates, as well as polymer.

          I sometimes hit them twice, but generally speaking not. I am running
          these on a
          Universal III,
          and it does require re-inking after each impression. I also pre-ink at
          least
          once, sometimes twice.

          Fine detail in the reverse causes severe problems, and would call for
          less
          dampening and
          somewhat less Setswell Compound. If you insist on such fine detail, you
          might
          try printing
          out on newsprint after each impression to clean the plate from excess
          ink.

          The full reverse requires a great deal of impression; sufficient that it
          might
          require
          an initial two-handed crank.

          All best

          Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press






          Katie Harper wrote:

          > Just had a workshop group of folks printing from polymer plates, with
          mixed
          > results. In most cases, when folks proofed on coated stock, they'd
          like what
          > they'd see and then when they tried to print on the run stock (usually
          > uncoated, ranging from Rives printmaking paper to card stock), almost
          all
          > were disappointed with the results. Even wetting the Rives slightly
          didn't
          > seem to give us a richer black in the larger solids.
          >
          > In some cases, what was being asked of the process was a bit
          impossible.
          > Fine detail in some areas with good blacks in the large solid areas.
          Plates
          > that contained both were especially problematic. However, I think that
          we
          > should have had a bit more satisfaction than we did.
          >
          > I attributed some of the dissatisfaction on the uncoated stock to the
          wrong
          > ink. We used Inmont Midnight Black, an ink I inherited with a load of
          > letterpress equipment last summer. It has worked quite nicely in the
          past
          > with type, but doesn't seem to do well with images, especially with
          larger
          > solids on uncoated stock. I think that some of the problems also might
          have
          > been due to some bad rollers on a "new" Vandercook that I recently
          got. The
          > rollers are smooth enough, but I suspect they have grown hard over the
          > years, perhaps leading to the obvious roller slur that we got.
          >
          > I know there has been some discussion about inks on this list in the
          past,
          > and I'm going to be ordering some "real" letterpress black ink; but
          I'm
          > wondering if any letterpress ink is capable of doing what I mention
          above:
          > give good blacks and yet hold fine detail on uncoated stocks.
          >
          > Any suggestions appreciated.
          >
          > Katie Harper
          > Ars Brevis Press
          > Cincinnati, OH
          > 513-233-9588
          >
          >
          > To post a message to the membership, send an email to
          > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
          > http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
          > [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
          > Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
          >
          > Encountering problems? send an email to
          > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > To unsubscribe, send an email to
          > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



          To post a message to the membership, send an email to
          PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com

          To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
          http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
          [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
          Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]

          Encountering problems? send an email to
          PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com

          To unsubscribe, send an email to
          PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • Katie Harper
          I don t know about Philip, but when I say reverse I mean white type on a black background. It is not an intaglio process; the ink is still on the top of the
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 27 12:22 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            I don't know about Philip, but when I say "reverse" I mean white type on a
            black background. It is not an intaglio process; the ink is still on the top
            of the form and not below the surface, as in intaglio.


            Katie Harper
            Ars Brevis Press
            Cincinnati, OH
            513-233-9588




            > From: "Marnie Powers-Torrey" <marnie.torrey@...>
            > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 13:13:48 -0700
            > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
            > Subject: RE: [PPLetterpress] Printing troubles?
            >
            > Katie and Philip-
            >
            > I've been out of town for a month and apologize for the tardiness of my
            > question. In the discussion below, are you referring to printing
            > intaglio on a letterpress when you speak of printing "full reverse"?
            >
            > Marnie
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: philip gallo [mailto:phil@...]
            > Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2002 5:36 PM
            > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Printing troubles?
            >
            >
            > I've been running full reverse plates as large as 11x14 using Daniel
            > Smith
            > Velvet Black #65,
            > with the addition of Setswell Compound, a flow agent, also available
            > from
            > Daniel Smith.
            > The standard formulation calls for not more than ten-percent additive to
            > the
            > ink.
            >
            > I've been printing Rives BFK, Arches Cover, Somerset Velvet and Lana Lin
            > de Pur
            > dampened
            > from linoleum blocks, 1/4-inch magnesium plates, as well as polymer.
            >
            > I sometimes hit them twice, but generally speaking not. I am running
            > these on a
            > Universal III,
            > and it does require re-inking after each impression. I also pre-ink at
            > least
            > once, sometimes twice.
            >
            > Fine detail in the reverse causes severe problems, and would call for
            > less
            > dampening and
            > somewhat less Setswell Compound. If you insist on such fine detail, you
            > might
            > try printing
            > out on newsprint after each impression to clean the plate from excess
            > ink.
            >
            > The full reverse requires a great deal of impression; sufficient that it
            > might
            > require
            > an initial two-handed crank.
            >
            > All best
            >
            > Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Katie Harper wrote:
            >
            >> Just had a workshop group of folks printing from polymer plates, with
            > mixed
            >> results. In most cases, when folks proofed on coated stock, they'd
            > like what
            >> they'd see and then when they tried to print on the run stock (usually
            >> uncoated, ranging from Rives printmaking paper to card stock), almost
            > all
            >> were disappointed with the results. Even wetting the Rives slightly
            > didn't
            >> seem to give us a richer black in the larger solids.
            >>
            >> In some cases, what was being asked of the process was a bit
            > impossible.
            >> Fine detail in some areas with good blacks in the large solid areas.
            > Plates
            >> that contained both were especially problematic. However, I think that
            > we
            >> should have had a bit more satisfaction than we did.
            >>
            >> I attributed some of the dissatisfaction on the uncoated stock to the
            > wrong
            >> ink. We used Inmont Midnight Black, an ink I inherited with a load of
            >> letterpress equipment last summer. It has worked quite nicely in the
            > past
            >> with type, but doesn't seem to do well with images, especially with
            > larger
            >> solids on uncoated stock. I think that some of the problems also might
            > have
            >> been due to some bad rollers on a "new" Vandercook that I recently
            > got. The
            >> rollers are smooth enough, but I suspect they have grown hard over the
            >> years, perhaps leading to the obvious roller slur that we got.
            >>
            >> I know there has been some discussion about inks on this list in the
            > past,
            >> and I'm going to be ordering some "real" letterpress black ink; but
            > I'm
            >> wondering if any letterpress ink is capable of doing what I mention
            > above:
            >> give good blacks and yet hold fine detail on uncoated stocks.
            >>
            >> Any suggestions appreciated.
            >>
            >> Katie Harper
            >> Ars Brevis Press
            >> Cincinnati, OH
            >> 513-233-9588
            >>
            >>
            >> To post a message to the membership, send an email to
            >> PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            >>
            >> To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
            >> http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
            >> [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
            >> Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
            >>
            >> Encountering problems? send an email to
            >> PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >>
            >> To unsubscribe, send an email to
            >> PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            > To post a message to the membership, send an email to
            > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
            > http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
            > [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
            > Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
            >
            > Encountering problems? send an email to
            > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > To unsubscribe, send an email to
            > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            > To post a message to the membership, send an email to
            > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
            > http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
            > [reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
            > Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
            >
            > Encountering problems? send an email to
            > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > To unsubscribe, send an email to
            > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
          • Marnie Powers-Torrey
            Katie- Thanks for the response. That s what I mean by reverse also, but wasn t clear on why Philip felt that that would need more pressure. Marnie ... From:
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 27 1:44 PM
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              Katie-

              Thanks for the response. That's what I mean by reverse also, but wasn't
              clear on why Philip felt that that would need more pressure.

              Marnie

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Katie Harper [mailto:knharper@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2002 1:22 PM
              To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Printing troubles?


              I don't know about Philip, but when I say "reverse" I mean white type on
              a
              black background. It is not an intaglio process; the ink is still on the
              top
              of the form and not below the surface, as in intaglio.


              Katie Harper
              Ars Brevis Press
              Cincinnati, OH
              513-233-9588




              > From: "Marnie Powers-Torrey" <marnie.torrey@...>
              > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2002 13:13:48 -0700
              > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
              > Subject: RE: [PPLetterpress] Printing troubles?
              >
              > Katie and Philip-
              >
              > I've been out of town for a month and apologize for the tardiness of
              my
              > question. In the discussion below, are you referring to printing
              > intaglio on a letterpress when you speak of printing "full reverse"?
              >
              > Marnie
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: philip gallo [mailto:phil@...]
              > Sent: Sunday, February 10, 2002 5:36 PM
              > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Printing troubles?
              >
              >
              > I've been running full reverse plates as large as 11x14 using Daniel
              > Smith
              > Velvet Black #65,
              > with the addition of Setswell Compound, a flow agent, also available
              > from
              > Daniel Smith.
              > The standard formulation calls for not more than ten-percent additive
              to
              > the
              > ink.
              >
              > I've been printing Rives BFK, Arches Cover, Somerset Velvet and Lana
              Lin
              > de Pur
              > dampened
              > from linoleum blocks, 1/4-inch magnesium plates, as well as polymer.
              >
              > I sometimes hit them twice, but generally speaking not. I am running
              > these on a
              > Universal III,
              > and it does require re-inking after each impression. I also pre-ink at
              > least
              > once, sometimes twice.
              >
              > Fine detail in the reverse causes severe problems, and would call for
              > less
              > dampening and
              > somewhat less Setswell Compound. If you insist on such fine detail,
              you
              > might
              > try printing
              > out on newsprint after each impression to clean the plate from excess
              > ink.
              >
              > The full reverse requires a great deal of impression; sufficient that
              it
              > might
              > require
              > an initial two-handed crank.
              >
              > All best
              >
              > Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Katie Harper wrote:
              >
              >> Just had a workshop group of folks printing from polymer plates, with
              > mixed
              >> results. In most cases, when folks proofed on coated stock, they'd
              > like what
              >> they'd see and then when they tried to print on the run stock
              (usually
              >> uncoated, ranging from Rives printmaking paper to card stock), almost
              > all
              >> were disappointed with the results. Even wetting the Rives slightly
              > didn't
              >> seem to give us a richer black in the larger solids.
              >>
              >> In some cases, what was being asked of the process was a bit
              > impossible.
              >> Fine detail in some areas with good blacks in the large solid areas.
              > Plates
              >> that contained both were especially problematic. However, I think
              that
              > we
              >> should have had a bit more satisfaction than we did.
              >>
              >> I attributed some of the dissatisfaction on the uncoated stock to the
              > wrong
              >> ink. We used Inmont Midnight Black, an ink I inherited with a load of
              >> letterpress equipment last summer. It has worked quite nicely in the
              > past
              >> with type, but doesn't seem to do well with images, especially with
              > larger
              >> solids on uncoated stock. I think that some of the problems also
              might
              > have
              >> been due to some bad rollers on a "new" Vandercook that I recently
              > got. The
              >> rollers are smooth enough, but I suspect they have grown hard over
              the
              >> years, perhaps leading to the obvious roller slur that we got.
              >>
              >> I know there has been some discussion about inks on this list in the
              > past,
              >> and I'm going to be ordering some "real" letterpress black ink; but
              > I'm
              >> wondering if any letterpress ink is capable of doing what I mention
              > above:
              >> give good blacks and yet hold fine detail on uncoated stocks.
              >>
              >> Any suggestions appreciated.
              >>
              >> Katie Harper
              >> Ars Brevis Press
              >> Cincinnati, OH
              >> 513-233-9588
              >>
              >>
              >> To post a message to the membership, send an email to
              >> PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              >>
              >> To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
              >> http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
              >> [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
              >> Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
              >>
              >> Encountering problems? send an email to
              >> PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
              >>
              >> To unsubscribe, send an email to
              >> PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >>
              >>
              >>
              >> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
              > To post a message to the membership, send an email to
              > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
              > http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
              > [copious reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
              > Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
              >
              > Encountering problems? send an email to
              > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > To unsubscribe, send an email to
              > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
              > To post a message to the membership, send an email to
              > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
              > http://groups.yahoogroups.com/group/PPLetterpress
              > [reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
              > Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]
              >
              > Encountering problems? send an email to
              > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > To unsubscribe, send an email to
              > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
              http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >




              To post a message to the membership, send an email to
              PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com

              To log on to the groupsite (confirmed Yahoo ID required), go to
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              [reference sources can be found onsite in Bookmarks (URLs),
              Database (tables), Files (documents), and Messages (archives)]

              Encountering problems? send an email to
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            • bielerpr
              Hey Phil Forgot about this until Marnie brought it up again. I d agree with all this—though the image of that two-handed crank has stayed with me. Can even
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 27 11:56 PM
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                Hey Phil

                Forgot about this until Marnie brought it up again. I'd agree
                with all this—though the image of that "two-handed crank" has stayed
                with me. Can even feel it in my forearms!!! You are doing this on
                photopolymer? Thought your Vandercook III was auto?

                The Charbonnel inks work quite well for solids and with the addition
                of Setswell compound. And if you are working with some fine lines
                within, judicious wiping, as I think was suggested by Gaylord, is
                what will do the trick.

                Robin Price and I did a broadside of a large Matisse woodcut once
                which was pretty much a solid with some fine edges to it. Think this
                was the procedure as you have outlined it. Though probably a bit more
                than a double hit.

                All best

                Ger

                --- In PPLetterpress@y..., philip gallo <phil@t...> wrote:
                > I've been running full reverse plates as large as 11x14 using Daniel Smit=h
                > Velvet Black #65,
                > with the addition of Setswell Compound, a flow agent, also available from=
                > Daniel Smith.
                > The standard formulation calls for not more than ten-percent additive to =the
                > ink.
                >
                > I've been printing Rives BFK, Arches Cover, Somerset Velvet and Lana Lin =de Pur
                > dampened
                > from linoleum blocks, 1/4-inch magnesium plates, as well as polymer.
                >
                > I sometimes hit them twice, but generally speaking not. I am running thes=e on a
                > Universal III,
                > and it does require re-inking after each impression. I also pre-ink at le=ast
                > once, sometimes twice.
                >
                > Fine detail in the reverse causes severe problems, and would call for les=s
                > dampening and
                > somewhat less Setswell Compound. If you insist on such fine detail, you m=ight
                > try printing
                > out on newsprint after each impression to clean the plate from excess ink=.
                >
                > The full reverse requires a great deal of impression; sufficient that it =might
                > require
                > an initial two-handed crank.
                >
                > All best
                >
                > Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press
              • Katie Harper
                Regarding the Daniel Smith black #65... I have been to their web site and don t see that ink. Does anyone know if there is a more updated number? They list a
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 28 5:49 AM
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                  Regarding the Daniel Smith black #65... I have been to their web site and
                  don't see that ink. Does anyone know if there is a more updated number? They
                  list a #75, for example, but not the word "velvet" in the title. Phone calls
                  to them go unanswered...

                  I have been using a newly acquired Hostmann-Steinberg black from NA
                  Graphics. So far, results have been good, but on the C&P, I have noticed
                  that blacks are not always completely as solid as they should be, as though
                  the ink is not flowing well into the paper fibers. Would the setswell
                  compound help? Someone else recommended plate oil, and I think stand oil was
                  also mentioned. Anyone have experience with any of these additives? Do they
                  tend to dilute the color at all?

                  Katie


                  Katie Harper
                  Ars Brevis Press
                  Cincinnati, OH
                  513-233-9588




                  > From: "bielerpr" <bieler@...>
                  > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2002 07:56:41 -0000
                  > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Printing troubles?
                  >
                  > Hey Phil
                  >
                  > Forgot about this until Marnie brought it up again. I'd agree
                  > with all this—though the image of that "two-handed crank" has stayed
                  > with me. Can even feel it in my forearms!!! You are doing this on
                  > photopolymer? Thought your Vandercook III was auto?
                  >
                  > The Charbonnel inks work quite well for solids and with the addition
                  > of Setswell compound. And if you are working with some fine lines
                  > within, judicious wiping, as I think was suggested by Gaylord, is
                  > what will do the trick.
                  >
                  > Robin Price and I did a broadside of a large Matisse woodcut once
                  > which was pretty much a solid with some fine edges to it. Think this
                  > was the procedure as you have outlined it. Though probably a bit more
                  > than a double hit.
                  >
                  > All best
                  >
                  > Ger
                  >
                  > --- In PPLetterpress@y..., philip gallo <phil@t...> wrote:
                  >> I've been running full reverse plates as large as 11x14 using Daniel Smit=h
                  >> Velvet Black #65,
                  >> with the addition of Setswell Compound, a flow agent, also available from=
                  >> Daniel Smith.
                  >> The standard formulation calls for not more than ten-percent additive to =the
                  >> ink.
                  >>
                  >> I've been printing Rives BFK, Arches Cover, Somerset Velvet and Lana Lin =de
                  >> Pur
                  >> dampened
                  >> from linoleum blocks, 1/4-inch magnesium plates, as well as polymer.
                  >>
                  >> I sometimes hit them twice, but generally speaking not. I am running thes=e
                  >> on a
                  >> Universal III,
                  >> and it does require re-inking after each impression. I also pre-ink at le=ast
                  >> once, sometimes twice.
                  >>
                  >> Fine detail in the reverse causes severe problems, and would call for les=s
                  >> dampening and
                  >> somewhat less Setswell Compound. If you insist on such fine detail, you
                  >> m=ight
                  >> try printing
                  >> out on newsprint after each impression to clean the plate from excess ink=.
                  >>
                  >> The full reverse requires a great deal of impression; sufficient that it
                  >> =might
                  >> require
                  >> an initial two-handed crank.
                  >>
                  >> All best
                  >>
                  >> Philip Gallo at The Hermetic Press
                  >
                  >
                  >
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                  >
                  >
                • bielerpr
                  ... Dear Katie I would not use the Setswell compound for anything other than large solids that are giving you trouble. You would not want to use it for type.
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 1, 2002
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                    >
                    > I have been using a newly acquired Hostmann-Steinberg black from NA
                    > Graphics. So far, results have been good, but on the C&P, I have noticed
                    > that blacks are not always completely as solid as they should be, as though
                    > the ink is not flowing well into the paper fibers. Would the setswell
                    > compound help? Someone else recommended plate oil, and I think stand oil was
                    > also mentioned. Anyone have experience with any of these additives? Do they
                    > tend to dilute the color at all?
                    >
                    > Katie

                    Dear Katie

                    I would not use the Setswell compound for anything other than large
                    solids that are giving you trouble. You would not want to use it for
                    type. It will muck up the works.

                    If the blacks are not as "solid" as you would like would dampening
                    the paper or increasing the impression a bit help? If it is just that
                    they are not of the color that you want, maybe you could add a tad of
                    red to the black? To get a really deep black on say a large initial,
                    I will sometimes print first in red and then print over this in
                    black. Yes, a double run. But I use Vandercooks and they are quite
                    precise in register.

                    Best not to put any additive in an ink, though having said that, it
                    seems that you always find you have to. To loosen an ink I find that
                    better than the traditional cutting varnish, is to find another black
                    of the same manufacture and similar brand but one that has less
                    viscosity, and use that as a mix. You can alter the resultant color
                    with a bit of red or blue to get nearer the finished black that
                    appeals to you.

                    All best

                    Gerald
                  • Katie Harper
                    Gerald: Thanks for your tips. I did in fact try moistening the paper and got a bit better blacks, but the results were not enough of an improvement to justify
                    Message 9 of 10 , Mar 2, 2002
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                      Gerald: Thanks for your tips. I did in fact try moistening the paper and got
                      a bit better blacks, but the results were not enough of an improvement to
                      justify the hassle.

                      This brings up a point: some say that humidity in the shop (or lack thereof)
                      is important; others say it makes no difference. Does anyone out there have
                      an opinion on that? On the day I was printing the above job, there was low
                      humidity (22%). The temp I can keep about 68-70°, but have not yet found a
                      way to control humidity, other than buying one of those small room
                      humidifiers. Is it worth it?


                      Katie Harper
                      Ars Brevis Press
                      Cincinnati, OH
                      513-233-9588




                      > From: "bielerpr" <bieler@...>
                      > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      > Date: Sat, 02 Mar 2002 02:26:19 -0000
                      > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Printing troubles?
                      >
                      >
                      >>
                      >> I have been using a newly acquired Hostmann-Steinberg black from NA
                      >> Graphics. So far, results have been good, but on the C&P, I have noticed
                      >> that blacks are not always completely as solid as they should be, as though
                      >> the ink is not flowing well into the paper fibers. Would the setswell
                      >> compound help? Someone else recommended plate oil, and I think stand oil was
                      >> also mentioned. Anyone have experience with any of these additives? Do they
                      >> tend to dilute the color at all?
                      >>
                      >> Katie
                      >
                      > Dear Katie
                      >
                      > I would not use the Setswell compound for anything other than large
                      > solids that are giving you trouble. You would not want to use it for
                      > type. It will muck up the works.
                      >
                      > If the blacks are not as "solid" as you would like would dampening
                      > the paper or increasing the impression a bit help? If it is just that
                      > they are not of the color that you want, maybe you could add a tad of
                      > red to the black? To get a really deep black on say a large initial,
                      > I will sometimes print first in red and then print over this in
                      > black. Yes, a double run. But I use Vandercooks and they are quite
                      > precise in register.
                      >
                      > Best not to put any additive in an ink, though having said that, it
                      > seems that you always find you have to. To loosen an ink I find that
                      > better than the traditional cutting varnish, is to find another black
                      > of the same manufacture and similar brand but one that has less
                      > viscosity, and use that as a mix. You can alter the resultant color
                      > with a bit of red or blue to get nearer the finished black that
                      > appeals to you.
                      >
                      > All best
                      >
                      > Gerald
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > To respond to this message or post a message to the membership:
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                      >
                      > Encountering problems?
                      > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
                      >
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                      >
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