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Lana Laid

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  • Katie Harper
    Bob: Lana is a paper mill in France that has been around since 1590. Unfortunately, according to US distributors, Lana Laid, which is a lovely hand-made or
    Message 1 of 63 , Jan 8, 2005
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      Bob:

      Lana is a paper mill in France that has been around since 1590.
      Unfortunately, according to US distributors, Lana Laid, which is a lovely
      hand-made or mould-maid laid text-weight sheet, is no longer being made. I
      bought up about 100 sheets on my last visit to Dolphin Papers in
      Indianapolis. If I had known they were the last I would see, I would have
      purchased more... Sigh... The most popular paper from Lana in the US is
      Lanaquarelle, their watercolor paper. I have also used this for letterpress
      printing; it's quite nice, but of course, is not text weight.

      Our wonderful paper friends come and go, n'est-ce pas? The nice thing for me
      is the continual discovering of new papers I had not seen before. So, it
      makes a nice cycle, really.

      Katie

      on 1/7/05 11:34 PM, Robert McGonigle at bobmcgonigle@... wrote:

      >
      > I never heard of this sheet. Was it made here?
      >
      > Bob McGonigle
      >
      > --- Katie Harper <knharper@...> wrote:
      >
      >> Speaking of lost paper, I picked up a few pieces of
      >> Lana Laid on a trip to
      >> Dolphin a few years ago. I?m now told that it?s been
      >> discontinued. Anyone
      >> know about this?
      >>
      >> Thanks.
      >>
      >> Katie Harper
      >>
      >> on 1/6/05 8:40 PM, Gerald Lange at
      >> bieler@... wrote:
      >>
      >>>
      >>> Lance and Gary
      >>>
      >>> Thank you for your responses. I tired xpedx, both
      >> via phone and on the web. No
      >>> Curtis there or anywhere else I looked. Looks like
      >> all the mills in the US
      >>> have closed. I wonder if the two Scottish mills
      >> closed as well?
      >>>
      >>> I do have a fairly good amount of the paper in
      >> stock, but a couple of the
      >>> colors are way down and was hoping to pick up
      >> more. Great cover paper for
      >>> letterpress work. Worked well printed damp (or
      >> dry). Greg Campbell, at
      >>> Campbell-Logan Bindery, sent samples out for
      >> testing way back when and it
      >>> turns out it was made primarily from tobacco!!!
      >>>
      >>> Gerald
      >>>
      >>> Lance Williams wrote:
      >>>
      >>>>> See, that's what I get for not updating my xpedx
      >> Electronic Product Guide
      >>>>> Regularly.... Now that I try, I get an error
      >> message....
      >>>>> (Database dated November 2003)
      >>>>>
      >>>>> - Lance
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>>>> [Original Message]
      >>>>>>> From: Gary Mordhorst <gary@...>
      >>>>>>> To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
      >>>>>>> Date: 1/6/2005 8:08:53 PM
      >>>>>>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Curtis Flannel
      >> Cover?
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>> Hi Gerald,
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>> Curtis is gone. Any of the sheets that were
      >> manufactured by Curtis are
      >>>>>>> considered "Mill Discontinued".
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>> Gary Mordhorst
      >>>>>>> AccuColor Plus, Inc.
      >>>>>>> www.accucolor.com
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>> Conventional offset Digital offset
      >> Contemporary
      >>>>>>> letterpress
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>> On Jan 6, 2005, at 5:31 PM, Gerald Lange
      >> wrote:
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>>> Hello folks
      >>>>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>>> Does anyone know of a US distributor for
      >> Curtis Flannel Cover paper.
      >>>>>>>>> Preferably LA, or west coast.
      >>>>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>>> My old distributor is gone, and I can't
      >> seem to get anywhere on the
      >>>>>>>>> web, mostly old information or company
      >> news. Curtis seems to have gone
      >>>>>>>>> through a number of mergers and buyouts.
      >>>>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>>> Gerald
      >>>>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>>>
      >>>>>>>>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >>> * To visit your group on the web, go to:
      >>> * http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PPLetterpress/
      >>> *
      >>> * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email
      >> to:
      >>> * PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >>>
      >>
      > <mailto:PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
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      >>> * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
      >> Yahoo! Terms of Service
      >>> <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been
      >> removed]
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      > =====
      > Bob McGonigle
      > 18 George Street
      > Milford, CT 06460
      > 203-876-7615
      > bobmcgonigle@...
      >
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    • Eric
      ... Yes, a ham-fisted approach will do serious damage, no denying that. But light blows from a heavy hammer will do the job more surely and more easily than
      Message 63 of 63 , Sep 21, 2011
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        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Fritz Klinke" <nagraph@...> wrote:
        >
        > If in doubt, using a larger hammer is surely going to lead to disaster and the worst thing you can do is fracture the hub of the cylinder that the handle attaches to and/or break the handle.

        Yes, a ham-fisted approach will do serious damage, no denying that. But light blows from a heavy hammer will do the job more surely and more easily than heavy blows with a light hammer. You have to be careful and feel your way into it rather than trying to beat it into submission. And you must be sure you are working from the thin end of the pin.
        The only time the large hammer method failed me was where someone had been trying to drive the pin out from the thick end, and trying very hard.
        --Eric Holub, SF
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