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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: letterpress recomendations

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  • Katie Harper
    Do you mean by ³regular letterpress² using metal type? Without getting too technical, basically what you do on any press is make the printing surface ³type
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 3 11:51 AM
      Do you mean by ³regular letterpress² using metal type? Without getting too
      technical, basically what you do on any press is make the printing surface
      ³type high² and print from that. The platen presses have a different action
      from a cylinder press, such as a Vandercook, and, as Gerald pointed out, the
      print quality will be slightly different, all else being equal. However,
      platens are perfectly capable of producing good work using either type or
      polymer plates. With type, you set the type and lock it into a chase, and
      that goes into the press, usually vertically (hence the emphasis on good
      lockup). With polymer, you put the plate on a base and lock the BASE into
      the chase. You can keep the base locked up and simply take one plate off and
      put another one down, depending on your layout.

      When I was working with C&Ps, I used the Boxcar base and the plastic-backed
      plates. I would sometimes have problems with inking due to the peculiarities
      of the way the platen rollers and springs all work. I believe that Harold
      Kyle at Boxcar has developed a base that is lower to accommodate a plate
      that has deeper relief, which should help in that regard, but I haven¹t
      tried it. I suggest you go to www.boxcarpress.com for more information.

      Good luck!

      Katie Harper

      on 1/3/05 12:54 PM, filmaker0012001 at fsmith01@... wrote:

      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Katie Harper <knharper@v...>
      > wrote:
      >> > I have used polymer a lot with platen presses. What would you like
      > to know?
      >> >
      >> > Katie Harper
      >> >
      >
      > Dear M. Harper,
      > Thank you for your offer and sorry to take so long to reply. To tell
      > the truth, I know virtually nothing about PPL, although I am trying
      > to learn more. My specifics are that I am going to do some regular
      > letterpress and that if more of a particular work is required later,
      > can I use a PPL and get a printing of similar quality and what
      > problems might I have with it?
      >
      > Respectfully,
      > F. Smith
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Frederick Smith
      Dear K. Harper, Yes, I meant using metal type to create the original, then keeping a master copy to burn a PPL plate if more were needed later. I ve seen
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 3 8:28 PM
        Dear K. Harper,
        Yes, I meant using metal type to create the original, then keeping a
        'master copy' to burn a PPL plate if more were needed later. I've seen some
        ads in "THE PRINTER", but wasn't sure it was an option I could use.
        Again, thank you for your reply.
        Respectfully,
        Frederick Smith

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Katie Harper" <knharper@...>
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, January 03, 2005 2:51 PM
        Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: letterpress recomendations



        Do you mean by ³regular letterpress² using metal type? Without getting too
        technical, basically what you do on any press is make the printing surface
        ³type high² and print from that. The platen presses have a different action
        from a cylinder press, such as a Vandercook, and, as Gerald pointed out, the
        print quality will be slightly different, all else being equal. However,
        platens are perfectly capable of producing good work using either type or
        polymer plates. With type, you set the type and lock it into a chase, and
        that goes into the press, usually vertically (hence the emphasis on good
        lockup). With polymer, you put the plate on a base and lock the BASE into
        the chase. You can keep the base locked up and simply take one plate off and
        put another one down, depending on your layout.

        When I was working with C&Ps, I used the Boxcar base and the plastic-backed
        plates. I would sometimes have problems with inking due to the peculiarities
        of the way the platen rollers and springs all work. I believe that Harold
        Kyle at Boxcar has developed a base that is lower to accommodate a plate
        that has deeper relief, which should help in that regard, but I haven¹t
        tried it. I suggest you go to www.boxcarpress.com for more information.

        Good luck!

        Katie Harper
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