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Re: [PPLetterpress] Ink : Tacky, and Drying

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  • Regis Graden
    Eileen, There is not one ink for all papers. Nor is there one solution to correct all problems. Some peoples s remedies cause more problems than they cure.
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 2, 2004
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      Eileen,

      There is not one ink for all papers. Nor is there one solution to correct all problems. Some peoples's "remedies" cause more problems than they cure.

      There is no instant way to gain experience.

      A little reducer in most stiff inks will stop picking and also allow better coverage in solids but can cause small type to fill counters. Small type faces need a stiffer ink for good printing. Usually large solids should be run in a seperate pass, then print the text even if in the same color ink.

      Regis Graden

      Eileen O Malley Callahan <africaomalley@...> wrote:
      Hi all:

      Two questions: Rubber-based ink, black: page of text, poetry, no
      solids. how long do folks leave this dry before startig into the
      second (color) run: no close registration, but printing on a
      Vandercook, so the sheet might need to feel the weight of the hand
      going around. And how about oil-based ink?

      Second question. Someone (a high-end invitation and stationary
      printer) informed me that putting a tiny, tiny bit of "tack reducer"
      on the platen ( 10x15 platen, different press) and allowing the press
      to work it in (or, I suppose, mixing it in ahead of time) would
      decrease problems with inking, especially solids, in the transfer of
      ink from the rollers to the solid image and/or type and hence, to
      the paper. Better results all round, he said, no matter the weather.
      Sounds counter-intuitive, but I thought I'd put it out there.

      What consistenly do you all use for your ink and has anyone been
      doing this? (I erased Chuck Sumner's elegant answer to the
      consistency question much earlier. Something like whipped cream
      before it begins to hold its weight in peaks.)










      --


      Eileen Grace O Malley Callahan
      Office of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies
      301 Campbell Hall
      University of California, Berkeley
      (510) 643-2173
      callahan@...

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    • Gerald Lange
      Eileen Ew, the dreaded ink question. Well, every printer has his own thing about inks... In regard to your first question. I don t actually notice a difference
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 2, 2004
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        Eileen

        Ew, the dreaded ink question. Well, every printer has his own thing
        about inks...

        In regard to your first question. I don't actually notice a difference
        between rubber- and oil-based inks. The latter drys out faster, that's
        about it. I start the second color as soon as I can, but I am
        generally working with dampened paper. Backing up, I try to leave at
        least 24 hours and then monitor the offset on the tympan quite
        carefully. If I am running an immediate run (re: "the weight of the
        hand"), I am tending to stretch my fingers to prevent possible
        operator smear.

        Second question. Solids are best handled with less tack to the ink. I
        use Setswell Compound as a reducer (for solids). Most printmaking
        suppliers, such as Dan Smith, carry this.

        Third question: Walter Hamady always said ink should slump not puddle.
        Not a bad rec. But you have to figure out what that exactly means for
        yourself.

        Also, re Regis's comment. To further that. I run separate runs for
        every variance in form; small type, medium type, large type,
        illustration, solids, etc. Another Hamady rec. But, then again, I have
        the luxury of not being a commercial letterpress printer.

        Gerald


        > Hi all:
        >
        > Two questions: Rubber-based ink, black: page of text, poetry, no
        > solids. how long do folks leave this dry before startig into the
        > second (color) run: no close registration, but printing on a
        > Vandercook, so the sheet might need to feel the weight of the hand
        > going around. And how about oil-based ink?
        >
        > Second question. Someone (a high-end invitation and stationary
        > printer) informed me that putting a tiny, tiny bit of "tack reducer"
        > on the platen ( 10x15 platen, different press) and allowing the press
        > to work it in (or, I suppose, mixing it in ahead of time) would
        > decrease problems with inking, especially solids, in the transfer of
        > ink from the rollers to the solid image and/or type and hence, to
        > the paper. Better results all round, he said, no matter the weather.
        > Sounds counter-intuitive, but I thought I'd put it out there.
        >
        > What consistenly do you all use for your ink and has anyone been
        > doing this? (I erased Chuck Sumner's elegant answer to the
        > consistency question much earlier. Something like whipped cream
        > before it begins to hold its weight in peaks.)

        >
        >
        > Eileen Grace O Malley Callahan
        > Office of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies
        > 301 Campbell Hall
        > University of California, Berkeley
        > (510) 643-2173
        > callahan@u...
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