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What's the best base to use for photopolymer plates???

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  • S.F. Letterpress Guild
    To list members of PPLetterpress, I m seeking your help... In so many words, I want to know from your own personal experience which is the best base to use for
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 22, 2004
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      To list members of PPLetterpress,

      I'm seeking your help...

      In so many words, I want to know from your own
      personal experience which is the best base to use for
      photopolymer plates? ...or, if you use a particular
      type of base and don't know about the others, what can
      you say about the base you do use, giving the pros and
      cons.

      Several letterpress printer friends of mine are asking
      about what's the best base to get, and I'm trying to
      do a little basic research and give them an informed
      answer.

      I did a search of the PPLetterpress archives and read
      through mountains of messages, but the jury still
      seems to be out.

      I confess that I am an old traditionalist letterpress
      printer and still use magnesium and zinc plates, but
      photopolymer seems to have come into its own in the
      past 10 years and I'm willing to give it a try.

      The three brands of bases that I found mentioned on
      the PPLetterpress list are:

      -Bunting Cerface (magnetic)
      -Boxcar (adhesive)
      -PatMag (magnetic)

      So here are my questions:

      1) Are there any other brands out there other than the
      ones listed above that are worthy of consideration?

      2) If quality of base and corresponding printed image
      is the primary concern, which base is the best and
      why?

      3) If low cost is the primary concern as long as an
      acceptable image is obtained, which base is the best
      and why?

      4) Which is better, magnetic or adhesive, and why? And
      of those available, which magnetic base is better or
      which adhesive base is better and why?

      5) In addition, I was intrigued with the discussions
      on the list about possibly using honeycomb bases or
      Wesel bases for locking in photopolymer plates since
      these are in common use for clamping down metal
      plates. What's the current status of such use, and
      would you advise pursuing this path as an alternative
      to the bases manufactured specifically for
      photopolymer plates?

      6) What is the current contact, cost and ordering
      information for each of the various types of bases and
      suppliers of photopolymer plate-making services and/or
      the equipment and supplies for making ones own? (I
      looked in the resources for PPLetterpress and found a
      few, but I bet others are out there too.)

      As you can see, my request is comprehensive and
      far-reaching. But don't let that keep you from
      responding if you don't know all the answers...just
      respond to those questions where you have experience,
      and leave the other questions for someone else.

      I also ask that you please respond to the entire list,
      so that we can all benefit from your knowledge.

      Aren't e-mail lists great!

      Thanks and best wishes,

      --Steve Robison, Belmont CA



      __________________________________________________
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    • Daniel Petrzelka
      I have had more experience with the magnetic bunting base than the Boxcar-- but even my limited experience with the boxcar bas has proven it to be superior.
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 22, 2004
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        I have had more experience with the magnetic bunting base than the
        Boxcar-- but even my limited experience with the boxcar bas has proven
        it to be superior.

        The clear backing on the photopolymer- and the etched lines on the
        Boxcar base make alignment a breeze. With the steel backed plates you
        have either cut the plates perfectly square (they must be cut with a
        blade appropriate for steel) or a t-square must be employed for
        alignment.

        The clear adhesive backed plates can be cut with scissors or an x-acto
        blade, elements can be cut out, and then placed back into the layout
        for printing two color jobs without worrying about separations before
        burning plates.

        All photopolymer systems seem to have excellent quality -- as long as
        you are diligent with your roller height adjustment. Get a roller gauge
        and keep them properly adjusted! That can't be stressed enough for high
        quality printing.


        Boxcar gets my vote-- it will be on ABC's Extreme Home Makeover in a
        few weeks-- and if it can be set up as quickly as it was amidst that
        riot, it's got to be good.

        Daniel Petrzelka
      • Jenni Won
        BOXCAR PRESS ROCKS! Their high-quality plates are indeed a breeze to use as elaborated by Daniel Petrzelka. Also noteworthy is their SUPERIOR customer service
        Message 3 of 14 , Nov 22, 2004
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          BOXCAR PRESS ROCKS!

          Their high-quality plates are indeed a breeze to use as elaborated by Daniel
          Petrzelka.

          Also noteworthy is their SUPERIOR customer service and support. They're
          extraordinarily helpful and reliable and have quick turnaround to boot. I
          work on tight deadlines, and knowing that Boxcar always come through with a
          quality product has truly been invaluable.

          Jenni Won
          loyal boxcar customer

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Daniel Petrzelka [mailto:petrzed@...]
          Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 4:41 PM
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] What's the best base to use for photopolymer
          plates???


          I have had more experience with the magnetic bunting base than the
          Boxcar-- but even my limited experience with the boxcar bas has proven
          it to be superior.

          The clear backing on the photopolymer- and the etched lines on the
          Boxcar base make alignment a breeze. With the steel backed plates you
          have either cut the plates perfectly square (they must be cut with a
          blade appropriate for steel) or a t-square must be employed for
          alignment.

          The clear adhesive backed plates can be cut with scissors or an x-acto
          blade, elements can be cut out, and then placed back into the layout
          for printing two color jobs without worrying about separations before
          burning plates.

          All photopolymer systems seem to have excellent quality -- as long as
          you are diligent with your roller height adjustment. Get a roller gauge
          and keep them properly adjusted! That can't be stressed enough for high
          quality printing.


          Boxcar gets my vote-- it will be on ABC's Extreme Home Makeover in a
          few weeks-- and if it can be set up as quickly as it was amidst that
          riot, it's got to be good.

          Daniel Petrzelka


          Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          ADVERTISEMENT





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        • Jessica Spring
          Here s my ten cents, having used all three: I strongly prefer the Boxcar. --The adhesive is easy to use and will reposition multiple times if needed. --The
          Message 4 of 14 , Nov 22, 2004
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            Here's my ten cents, having used all three: I strongly prefer the Boxcar.
            --The adhesive is easy to use and will reposition multiple times if needed.
            --The polymer is simple to cut with scissors or a blade.
            --The boxcar base grid is invaluable for positioning and plates don't creep.
            --Not even counting the cost of the bases, the adhesive-backed route pays
            for itself by allowing multiple colors printed from one piece of film and
            negative (assuming registration is loose enough). Registration is a breeze.
            --Easy to store and reuse--they don't warp like metal-backed plates.
            --Harold (Boxcar's inventor and supplier) provides amazing customer service
            whether you need help with the base or having plates made.

            I bought the largest sized base I could for my Vandys and am completely
            satisfied, and don't miss the days of tiny finger cuts and spray adhesive
            inhalation. Go back a little further to the frustration of wonky mag plates
            and I'm still not missing that either.
            --Jessica, Springtide Press

            > From: "S.F. Letterpress Guild" <sfletterpress@...>
            > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 12:47:28 -0800 (PST)
            > To: ppletterpress@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [PPLetterpress] What's the best base to use for photopolymer
            > plates???
            >
            >
            > To list members of PPLetterpress,
            >
            > I'm seeking your help...
            >
            > In so many words, I want to know from your own
            > personal experience which is the best base to use for
            > photopolymer plates? ...or, if you use a particular
            > type of base and don't know about the others, what can
            > you say about the base you do use, giving the pros and
            > cons.
            >
            > Several letterpress printer friends of mine are asking
            > about what's the best base to get, and I'm trying to
            > do a little basic research and give them an informed
            > answer.
            >
            > I did a search of the PPLetterpress archives and read
            > through mountains of messages, but the jury still
            > seems to be out.
            >
            > I confess that I am an old traditionalist letterpress
            > printer and still use magnesium and zinc plates, but
            > photopolymer seems to have come into its own in the
            > past 10 years and I'm willing to give it a try.
            >
            > The three brands of bases that I found mentioned on
            > the PPLetterpress list are:
            >
            > -Bunting Cerface (magnetic)
            > -Boxcar (adhesive)
            > -PatMag (magnetic)
            >
            > So here are my questions:
            >
            > 1) Are there any other brands out there other than the
            > ones listed above that are worthy of consideration?
            >
            > 2) If quality of base and corresponding printed image
            > is the primary concern, which base is the best and
            > why?
            >
            > 3) If low cost is the primary concern as long as an
            > acceptable image is obtained, which base is the best
            > and why?
            >
            > 4) Which is better, magnetic or adhesive, and why? And
            > of those available, which magnetic base is better or
            > which adhesive base is better and why?
            >
            > 5) In addition, I was intrigued with the discussions
            > on the list about possibly using honeycomb bases or
            > Wesel bases for locking in photopolymer plates since
            > these are in common use for clamping down metal
            > plates. What's the current status of such use, and
            > would you advise pursuing this path as an alternative
            > to the bases manufactured specifically for
            > photopolymer plates?
            >
            > 6) What is the current contact, cost and ordering
            > information for each of the various types of bases and
            > suppliers of photopolymer plate-making services and/or
            > the equipment and supplies for making ones own? (I
            > looked in the resources for PPLetterpress and found a
            > few, but I bet others are out there too.)
            >
            > As you can see, my request is comprehensive and
            > far-reaching. But don't let that keep you from
            > responding if you don't know all the answers...just
            > respond to those questions where you have experience,
            > and leave the other questions for someone else.
            >
            > I also ask that you please respond to the entire list,
            > so that we can all benefit from your knowledge.
            >
            > Aren't e-mail lists great!
            >
            > Thanks and best wishes,
            >
            > --Steve Robison, Belmont CA
            >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do You Yahoo!?
            > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            > http://mail.yahoo.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
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            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • Katie Harper
            I use the Boxcar base, now that I¹m printing primarily on a Vandercook. I find that the grid printed on the base, used in conjunction with the plastic-backed
            Message 5 of 14 , Nov 22, 2004
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              I use the Boxcar base, now that I¹m printing primarily on a Vandercook. I
              find that the grid printed on the base, used in conjunction with the
              plastic-backed plates, makes an ideal registration setup. I have never had
              problems with ³creep² on the bases or plates or the adhesive that comes on
              the Boxcar plates, although I have used other adhesives (ie, spray) with
              success, too. I also like the fact that I can cut the plates with scissors
              quite easily. I can even cut very small bits with an Xacto knife on press if
              needed. Huge advantage over metal-backed plates, in my book.

              I have had success using non-professional bases such as store-bought
              linoleum bases and even particle board built up with plexiglas. When one is
              a teacher, one learns many workarounds to purchasing the expensive machined
              bases. But I have used this workaround in my professional work, too,
              although I don¹t do it regularly.

              Recently, we hosted a workshop here in Beverly, MA, run by a master printer
              whom I deeply admire. He brought with him his Bunting bases and showed us
              all his various and sundry methods for alignment of the metal backed plates,
              including pointing out slight differences between brands of plates. These
              workarounds involved some elaborate and time-consuming methods in some
              cases, labor that would easily have been saved with translucent plates on a
              base with an alignment grid. His reasons for using the metal-backed plates
              and the Bunting base were not all that convincing, to be honest. Seemed to
              be mostly an ingrained preference for metal, including the ³burn² (ie slight
              cut) that you get when you have to move the plate once it is adhered to the
              base, if you are not careful. Sounded to me like the ³cut² was a badge of
              courage, of sorts...

              I wonder sometimes if metal backed plates do last longer. I think the
              plastic backed ones might become brittle much faster, but I have not done
              any real tests in this regard.

              My advice to anyone starting to print letterpress with photopolymer would be
              to try both methods (ie, plastic-backed plates v. metal-backed) and see what
              results you get and what you prefer. Remember that the plates come in a wide
              variety of depths and depth of relief, and that can make a difference. I
              confess I have not purchased a Bunting base, nor the plate cutting equipment
              I would have to use to go with it. But I have been a happy printer,
              nonetheless.

              Katie Harper
              Ars Brevis Press
              Beverly, MA

              on 11/22/04 3:47 PM, S.F. Letterpress Guild at sfletterpress@...
              wrote:

              > To list members of PPLetterpress,
              >
              > I'm seeking your help...
              >
              > In so many words, I want to know from your own
              > personal experience which is the best base to use for
              > photopolymer plates? ...or, if you use a particular
              > type of base and don't know about the others, what can
              > you say about the base you do use, giving the pros and
              > cons.
              >
              > Several letterpress printer friends of mine are asking
              > about what's the best base to get, and I'm trying to
              > do a little basic research and give them an informed
              > answer.
              >
              > I did a search of the PPLetterpress archives and read
              > through mountains of messages, but the jury still
              > seems to be out.
              >
              > I confess that I am an old traditionalist letterpress
              > printer and still use magnesium and zinc plates, but
              > photopolymer seems to have come into its own in the
              > past 10 years and I'm willing to give it a try.
              >
              > The three brands of bases that I found mentioned on
              > the PPLetterpress list are:
              >
              > -Bunting Cerface (magnetic)
              > -Boxcar (adhesive)
              > -PatMag (magnetic)
              >
              > So here are my questions:
              >
              > 1) Are there any other brands out there other than the
              > ones listed above that are worthy of consideration?
              >
              > 2) If quality of base and corresponding printed image
              > is the primary concern, which base is the best and
              > why?
              >
              > 3) If low cost is the primary concern as long as an
              > acceptable image is obtained, which base is the best
              > and why?
              >
              > 4) Which is better, magnetic or adhesive, and why? And
              > of those available, which magnetic base is better or
              > which adhesive base is better and why?
              >
              > 5) In addition, I was intrigued with the discussions
              > on the list about possibly using honeycomb bases or
              > Wesel bases for locking in photopolymer plates since
              > these are in common use for clamping down metal
              > plates. What's the current status of such use, and
              > would you advise pursuing this path as an alternative
              > to the bases manufactured specifically for
              > photopolymer plates?
              >
              > 6) What is the current contact, cost and ordering
              > information for each of the various types of bases and
              > suppliers of photopolymer plate-making services and/or
              > the equipment and supplies for making ones own? (I
              > looked in the resources for PPLetterpress and found a
              > few, but I bet others are out there too.)
              >
              > As you can see, my request is comprehensive and
              > far-reaching. But don't let that keep you from
              > responding if you don't know all the answers...just
              > respond to those questions where you have experience,
              > and leave the other questions for someone else.
              >
              > I also ask that you please respond to the entire list,
              > so that we can all benefit from your knowledge.
              >
              > Aren't e-mail lists great!
              >
              > Thanks and best wishes,
              >
              > --Steve Robison, Belmont CA
              >
              >
              >
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Gerald Lange
              Steve I m not a fan of forms but I ll give this a shot (personal opinion, of course). ... There are many other brands out there, check the links and database
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 3, 2004
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                Steve

                I'm not a fan of forms but I'll give this a shot (personal opinion, of
                course).

                > 1) Are there any other brands out there other than the
                > ones listed above that are worthy of consideration?

                There are many other brands out there, check the links and database
                here. Of the industry bases, the Bunting is the most well known and
                has been around for quite some long time. Don't know if it is the
                best, but it is the most well known. The Patmag and the Boxcar are
                bases developed in the last decade or so for the newer
                studio-letterpress market.

                > 2) If quality of base and corresponding printed image
                > is the primary concern, which base is the best and
                > why?

                Well, I would go for any base marketed for the commercial industry,
                which would be a magnetic flatbase. Why? Because they were developed
                for the commercial letterpress market.

                > 3) If low cost is the primary concern as long as an
                > acceptable image is obtained, which base is the best
                > and why?

                I recommend the Patmag and Boxcar to most of my clients who are "on a
                tight budget." These bases are comparable in pricing. Main factors in
                chosing one or the other would be who are you buying your plates from?
                (the Patmag requires steel-backed, the Boxcar requires plastic-backed)

                > 4) Which is better, magnetic or adhesive, and why? And
                > of those available, which magnetic base is better or
                > which adhesive base is better and why?

                I prefer no variance between printing surface and bed. I'm an old
                metal type guy at heart. I use the Bunting Cerface base. It was the
                most common base out there when I started using photopolymer. I've
                tried the Patmag and Boxcar but I simply don't, or won't, put my trust
                in adhesives or rubber (magnetic sheeting). Others may disagree, I
                don't care. The only currently available adhesive base that I know of
                is the Boxcar.

                > 5) In addition, I was intrigued with the discussions
                > on the list about possibly using honeycomb bases or
                > Wesel bases for locking in photopolymer plates since
                > these are in common use for clamping down metal
                > plates. What's the current status of such use, and
                > would you advise pursuing this path as an alternative
                > to the bases manufactured specifically for
                > photopolymer plates?

                The one manufacturer (Australian) I found who was supplying these
                seems to have failed in capturing a market. But, a copper engraving
                mounted on either a honeycomb or diagonal groove base will give
                photopolymer a pretty good run for its money, and has the great
                advantage of precise registration capabilities (especially if you have
                multiple bases for use in color work).

                > 6) What is the current contact, cost and ordering
                > information for each of the various types of bases and
                > suppliers of photopolymer plate-making services and/or
                > the equipment and supplies for making ones own? (I
                > looked in the resources for PPLetterpress and found a
                > few, but I bet others are out there too.)

                See answer No. 1. The information is there, plenty of it, you have to
                do some of the work yourself. :-)

                Gerald




                > To list members of PPLetterpress,
                >
                > I'm seeking your help...
                >
                > In so many words, I want to know from your own
                > personal experience which is the best base to use for
                > photopolymer plates? ...or, if you use a particular
                > type of base and don't know about the others, what can
                > you say about the base you do use, giving the pros and
                > cons.
                >
                > Several letterpress printer friends of mine are asking
                > about what's the best base to get, and I'm trying to
                > do a little basic research and give them an informed
                > answer.
                >
                > I did a search of the PPLetterpress archives and read
                > through mountains of messages, but the jury still
                > seems to be out.
                >
                > I confess that I am an old traditionalist letterpress
                > printer and still use magnesium and zinc plates, but
                > photopolymer seems to have come into its own in the
                > past 10 years and I'm willing to give it a try.
                >
                > The three brands of bases that I found mentioned on
                > the PPLetterpress list are:
                >
                > -Bunting Cerface (magnetic)
                > -Boxcar (adhesive)
                > -PatMag (magnetic)
                >
                > So here are my questions:
                >
                > 1) Are there any other brands out there other than the
                > ones listed above that are worthy of consideration?
                >
                > 2) If quality of base and corresponding printed image
                > is the primary concern, which base is the best and
                > why?
                >
                > 3) If low cost is the primary concern as long as an
                > acceptable image is obtained, which base is the best
                > and why?
                >
                > 4) Which is better, magnetic or adhesive, and why? And
                > of those available, which magnetic base is better or
                > which adhesive base is better and why?
                >
                > 5) In addition, I was intrigued with the discussions
                > on the list about possibly using honeycomb bases or
                > Wesel bases for locking in photopolymer plates since
                > these are in common use for clamping down metal
                > plates. What's the current status of such use, and
                > would you advise pursuing this path as an alternative
                > to the bases manufactured specifically for
                > photopolymer plates?
                >
                > 6) What is the current contact, cost and ordering
                > information for each of the various types of bases and
                > suppliers of photopolymer plate-making services and/or
                > the equipment and supplies for making ones own? (I
                > looked in the resources for PPLetterpress and found a
                > few, but I bet others are out there too.)
                >
                > As you can see, my request is comprehensive and
                > far-reaching. But don't let that keep you from
                > responding if you don't know all the answers...just
                > respond to those questions where you have experience,
                > and leave the other questions for someone else.
                >
                > I also ask that you please respond to the entire list,
                > so that we can all benefit from your knowledge.
                >
                > Aren't e-mail lists great!
                >
                > Thanks and best wishes,
                >
                > --Steve Robison, Belmont CA
                >
                >
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                > http://mail.yahoo.com
              • Paul W Romaine
                Steve, Just to add to Gerald s remarks, if you re a list subscriber, you can also search the PPL archives at Yahoo Groups for the manufacturers. It s one thing
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 4, 2004
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                  Steve,
                  Just to add to Gerald's remarks, if you're a list subscriber, you can
                  also search the PPL archives at Yahoo Groups for the manufacturers.
                  It's one thing to read opinion, and another to read about someone's
                  experience, problems, praise, etc.

                  The PPL list is protected by password from spambots and assorted
                  internet miscreants, so you'll need a Yahoo UserID/Password--you can
                  skip the stuff about your address and age, unless you plan to use
                  yahoo's dating services.... ;-)

                  Below is the general information notice which we periodically post here.

                  All best
                  Paul
                  Co-moderator




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                  Gerald Lange and Paul Romaine, Moderators
                • Champe Smith
                  Responding to the question about bases, I don¹t think anyone has mentioned you can also have aluminum bases made for you. I believe this is a relatively less
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 6, 2004
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                    Responding to the question about bases, I don¹t think anyone has mentioned
                    you can also have aluminum bases made for you. I believe this is a
                    relatively less expensive option than a magnetic base. I called Peter Koch¹s
                    office a few years ago and got advice. They steered me to TCI Aluminum, but
                    many machine shops could probably supply you. You just have to have it
                    ground to the right height for the plate material you¹re using.

                    Some more information about TCI:
                    Hugh O¹Donnell
                    TCI Aluminum (in CA)
                    hugh@...
                    (800) 824-6197

                    I ordered an aluminum plate .861" thick
                    - cast alloy, precision ground
                    - 60/61 alloy sheet, precision ground
                    - deviation - flat within 2/1000

                    At first, I was using spray mount for placement. At the Center for Book Arts
                    in New York, they also use non-magnetized bases. They don¹t allow spray
                    mount because of the noxious fumes involved ‹ they only use masking tape to
                    adhere plate to the base, which seems to work fine. Haven¹t had a problem
                    with plate creep, but I haven¹t done big edition runs (maximum 100-120).

                    Regards,
                    Champe Smith







                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Gerald Lange
                    Steve and others This is the reference I have on the Australian manufacturer that I mentioned previously. http://www.fsea.com/if/article.asp?ID=9 I was in
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 20, 2004
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                      Steve and others

                      This is the reference I have on the Australian manufacturer that I
                      mentioned previously.

                      http://www.fsea.com/if/article.asp?ID=9

                      I was in contact with TDI Magneticx at one time (maybe a couple of
                      years ago now). The fellow sent some PDFs but I couldn't get pricing
                      or further details out of him, and then finally dropped it. I have not
                      seen any further information on it in the literature.

                      I had contacted Bunting about the idea at one point, and they were
                      quite interested, had me talk to a tech guy etc. They thought it easy
                      enough to do, but I assume they probably didn't see a potential market
                      as I have heard nothing further from them about it either.

                      Also, PPL member Michael T. Metz has something similar that he
                      developed and uses. We had a conversation on the list a while back
                      about that.

                      I've been intrigued with the idea, but not necessarily as an
                      alternative to current magnetic flatbases.

                      Gerald

                      >
                      > 5) In addition, I was intrigued with the discussions
                      > on the list about possibly using honeycomb bases or
                      > Wesel bases for locking in photopolymer plates since
                      > these are in common use for clamping down metal
                      > plates. What's the current status of such use, and
                      > would you advise pursuing this path as an alternative
                      > to the bases manufactured specifically for
                      > photopolymer plates?
                      >
                    • Regis Graden
                      Bunting bases are the perfect product to use with metal backed polymer plates. Why try to improve a perfect product? But if we are trying to find a cheaper
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 20, 2004
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                        Bunting bases are the perfect product to use with metal backed polymer plates. Why try to improve a perfect product? But if we are trying to find a cheaper solution, it will no longer be perfect, it will be cheaper and not as perfect.

                        Only my opinion,

                        Regis



                        Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                        Steve and others

                        This is the reference I have on the Australian manufacturer that I
                        mentioned previously.

                        http://www.fsea.com/if/article.asp?ID=9

                        I was in contact with TDI Magneticx at one time (maybe a couple of
                        years ago now). The fellow sent some PDFs but I couldn't get pricing
                        or further details out of him, and then finally dropped it. I have not
                        seen any further information on it in the literature.

                        I had contacted Bunting about the idea at one point, and they were
                        quite interested, had me talk to a tech guy etc. They thought it easy
                        enough to do, but I assume they probably didn't see a potential market
                        as I have heard nothing further from them about it either.

                        Also, PPL member Michael T. Metz has something similar that he
                        developed and uses. We had a conversation on the list a while back
                        about that.

                        I've been intrigued with the idea, but not necessarily as an
                        alternative to current magnetic flatbases.

                        Gerald

                        >
                        > 5) In addition, I was intrigued with the discussions
                        > on the list about possibly using honeycomb bases or
                        > Wesel bases for locking in photopolymer plates since
                        > these are in common use for clamping down metal
                        > plates. What's the current status of such use, and
                        > would you advise pursuing this path as an alternative
                        > to the bases manufactured specifically for
                        > photopolymer plates?
                        >








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                      • Gerald Lange
                        Regis I think the overriding concern here would be if you already had a honeycomb base and would like to have the flexibility to print either metal
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 20, 2004
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                          Regis

                          I think the overriding concern here would be if you already had a honeycomb base and would like to have the flexibility to print either metal photoengraved plates or photopolmer plates on it. Honeycombs and the older diagonal groove bases are quite precise and have the added benefit of adjustable and accurate registration capabilities thanks to the toggle hooks.

                          I'd agree the Bunting is a pretty good product, it's been around for quite some time, and is used by many commercial concerns. I like my Bunting bases mainly because I don't have to think about them, or mess with them. I think of them as just a higher bed. Drop the plate on, register, and print. No further fuss or muss.

                          I don't need the magnetic pads, but sure would like to give them a shot, just out of curiousity.

                          Gerald

                          Regis Graden wrote:

                          >Bunting bases are the perfect product to use with metal backed polymer plates. Why try to improve a perfect product? But if we are trying to find a cheaper solution, it will no longer be perfect, it will be cheaper and not as perfect.
                          >
                          >Only my opinion,
                          >
                          >Regis
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                          >Steve and others
                          >
                          >This is the reference I have on the Australian manufacturer that I
                          >mentioned previously.
                          >
                          >http://www.fsea.com/if/article.asp?ID=9
                          >
                          >I was in contact with TDI Magneticx at one time (maybe a couple of
                          >years ago now). The fellow sent some PDFs but I couldn't get pricing
                          >or further details out of him, and then finally dropped it. I have not
                          >seen any further information on it in the literature.
                          >
                          >I had contacted Bunting about the idea at one point, and they were
                          >quite interested, had me talk to a tech guy etc. They thought it easy
                          >enough to do, but I assume they probably didn't see a potential market
                          >as I have heard nothing further from them about it either.
                          >
                          >Also, PPL member Michael T. Metz has something similar that he
                          >developed and uses. We had a conversation on the list a while back
                          >about that.
                          >
                          >I've been intrigued with the idea, but not necessarily as an
                          >alternative to current magnetic flatbases.
                          >
                          >Gerald
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Regis Graden
                          Why not have both worlds? I have honeycomb bases with hooks and bunting along with Pat s bases. I m covered for whatever comes along. I can use unmounted
                          Message 12 of 14 , Dec 20, 2004
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                            Why not have both worlds? I have honeycomb bases with hooks and bunting along with Pat's bases. I'm covered for whatever comes along. I can use unmounted engravings or polymer. Though seldom use engravings or mags.

                            Regis



                            Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                            Regis

                            I think the overriding concern here would be if you already had a honeycomb base and would like to have the flexibility to print either metal photoengraved plates or photopolmer plates on it. Honeycombs and the older diagonal groove bases are quite precise and have the added benefit of adjustable and accurate registration capabilities thanks to the toggle hooks.

                            I'd agree the Bunting is a pretty good product, it's been around for quite some time, and is used by many commercial concerns. I like my Bunting bases mainly because I don't have to think about them, or mess with them. I think of them as just a higher bed. Drop the plate on, register, and print. No further fuss or muss.

                            I don't need the magnetic pads, but sure would like to give them a shot, just out of curiousity.

                            Gerald

                            Regis Graden wrote:

                            >Bunting bases are the perfect product to use with metal backed polymer plates. Why try to improve a perfect product? But if we are trying to find a cheaper solution, it will no longer be perfect, it will be cheaper and not as perfect.
                            >
                            >Only my opinion,
                            >
                            >Regis
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                            >Steve and others
                            >
                            >This is the reference I have on the Australian manufacturer that I
                            >mentioned previously.
                            >
                            >http://www.fsea.com/if/article.asp?ID=9
                            >
                            >I was in contact with TDI Magneticx at one time (maybe a couple of
                            >years ago now). The fellow sent some PDFs but I couldn't get pricing
                            >or further details out of him, and then finally dropped it. I have not
                            >seen any further information on it in the literature.
                            >
                            >I had contacted Bunting about the idea at one point, and they were
                            >quite interested, had me talk to a tech guy etc. They thought it easy
                            >enough to do, but I assume they probably didn't see a potential market
                            >as I have heard nothing further from them about it either.
                            >
                            >Also, PPL member Michael T. Metz has something similar that he
                            >developed and uses. We had a conversation on the list a while back
                            >about that.
                            >
                            >I've been intrigued with the idea, but not necessarily as an
                            >alternative to current magnetic flatbases.
                            >
                            >Gerald
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >






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                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Gerald Lange
                            Regis I d say $$$, but I suspect the pads would be quite expensive. I ve also checked the pricing on new low profile Sterling honeycombs and with hooks and all
                            Message 13 of 14 , Dec 20, 2004
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                              Regis

                              I'd say $$$, but I suspect the pads would be quite expensive. I've also checked the pricing on new low profile Sterling honeycombs and with hooks and all and we are getting quite near Bunting pricing. Or maybe I should say industry pricing. Not that I have a problem with that, someone has to pay for the engineering and manufacturing - which is why there are no new letterpress presses out there). Just to remind myself (eBay and Letpress can confuse one as to the value of letterpress things), I occasionally look at the reply to a letter to Vandercook asking for the pricing on a new SP-15. In 1975. Lordy, I could have purchased a new car for that. Unfortunately, no money for the press or the new car.

                              I do find it more convenient to use copper photo engravings mounted on patent bases for four-color work. I just don't have enough specific size magnetic flatbases to make that quite work for photopolymer.

                              Gerald

                              Regis Graden wrote:

                              >Why not have both worlds? I have honeycomb bases with hooks and bunting along with Pat's bases. I'm covered for whatever comes along. I can use unmounted engravings or polymer. Though seldom use engravings or mags.
                              >
                              >Regis
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                              >Regis
                              >
                              >I think the overriding concern here would be if you already had a honeycomb base and would like to have the flexibility to print either metal photoengraved plates or photopolmer plates on it. Honeycombs and the older diagonal groove bases are quite precise and have the added benefit of adjustable and accurate registration capabilities thanks to the toggle hooks.
                              >
                              >I'd agree the Bunting is a pretty good product, it's been around for quite some time, and is used by many commercial concerns. I like my Bunting bases mainly because I don't have to think about them, or mess with them. I think of them as just a higher bed. Drop the plate on, register, and print. No further fuss or muss.
                              >
                              >I don't need the magnetic pads, but sure would like to give them a shot, just out of curiousity.
                              >
                              >Gerald
                              >
                            • Regis Graden
                              Gerald, You are correct you know. Photo engravings mounted on patent base has worked quite well for 70 years or so. Happy Holidays, Regis Gerald Lange
                              Message 14 of 14 , Dec 21, 2004
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                                Gerald,
                                You are correct you know. Photo engravings mounted on patent base has worked quite well for 70 years or so.

                                Happy Holidays,

                                Regis

                                Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:

                                Regis

                                I'd say $$$, but I suspect the pads would be quite expensive. I've also checked the pricing on new low profile Sterling honeycombs and with hooks and all and we are getting quite near Bunting pricing. Or maybe I should say industry pricing. Not that I have a problem with that, someone has to pay for the engineering and manufacturing - which is why there are no new letterpress presses out there). Just to remind myself (eBay and Letpress can confuse one as to the value of letterpress things), I occasionally look at the reply to a letter to Vandercook asking for the pricing on a new SP-15. In 1975. Lordy, I could have purchased a new car for that. Unfortunately, no money for the press or the new car.

                                I do find it more convenient to use copper photo engravings mounted on patent bases for four-color work. I just don't have enough specific size magnetic flatbases to make that quite work for photopolymer.

                                Gerald

                                Regis Graden wrote:

                                >Why not have both worlds? I have honeycomb bases with hooks and bunting along with Pat's bases. I'm covered for whatever comes along. I can use unmounted engravings or polymer. Though seldom use engravings or mags.
                                >
                                >Regis
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >Gerald Lange <bieler@...> wrote:
                                >Regis
                                >
                                >I think the overriding concern here would be if you already had a honeycomb base and would like to have the flexibility to print either metal photoengraved plates or photopolmer plates on it. Honeycombs and the older diagonal groove bases are quite precise and have the added benefit of adjustable and accurate registration capabilities thanks to the toggle hooks.
                                >
                                >I'd agree the Bunting is a pretty good product, it's been around for quite some time, and is used by many commercial concerns. I like my Bunting bases mainly because I don't have to think about them, or mess with them. I think of them as just a higher bed. Drop the plate on, register, and print. No further fuss or muss.
                                >
                                >I don't need the magnetic pads, but sure would like to give them a shot, just out of curiousity.
                                >
                                >Gerald
                                >




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