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Adjustments to Font Metrics

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  • Ph. D.
    I m digitizing a font. I recall reading that digital fonts need to be thinned down a bit to allow for ink spread when the font is made into a photopolymer
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 6, 2004
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      I'm digitizing a font. I recall reading that digital fonts need
      to be thinned down a bit to allow for ink spread when the
      font is made into a photopolymer plate. I am assuming the
      same is true if I have matrices cut for casting regular metal
      type.

      My question is, how much should I thin the characters?

      Thanks,
      Ph. D.
    • Gerald Lange
      Ph. D. Probably the most appropriate way to proceed is to digitize the font at the weight that seems correct to you, testing this as you go on a
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 6, 2004
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        Ph. D.

        Probably the most appropriate way to proceed is to digitize the font at the weight that seems correct to you, testing this as you go on a high-resolution laser printer (1200dpi) or preferably, an image setter (2400dpi).

        When you have completed the font you can easily create instances of it with Fontographer or FontLab in various weights (thicker or thinner). These instances can serve as a form of cheap and dirty way to size optimize a font. You can't reduce or expand the weight by much though as the character outline points will become disturbed.

        There is no easy answer to the "how much" question but if the ultimate goal is to use digitization for creating a metal face, the photopolymer process will provide a fairly useful testing ground. You should be able to determine how much expansion will occur as a result of ink gain and impression and adjust accordingly.

        FontLab also allows for interpolation (increasing or decreasing weight and other glyph attributes) during the post-creation process through its Transformation feature. I haven't tried it for this purpose but from what I have seen it might be worth while exploring.

        Per you interest, I have some material pertaining to this at http://bielerpress.blogspot.com/

        Good luck with it

        Gerald



        > I'm digitizing a font. I recall reading that digital fonts need
        > to be thinned down a bit to allow for ink spread when the
        > font is made into a photopolymer plate. I am assuming the
        > same is true if I have matrices cut for casting regular metal
        > type.
        >
        > My question is, how much should I thin the characters?
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Ph. D.
      • Ph. D.
        Thank you for the advice, Gerald. That s pretty much the way I ve been going. I ve done almost all the capital letters, then I print them out in words on a
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 7, 2004
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          Thank you for the advice, Gerald. That's pretty much the way
          I've been going. I've done almost all the capital letters, then I
          print them out in words on a 1200 dpi laser printer. I figured
          that once I get the entire font the way I want it on the laser
          output, then I can thin it a bit and use it for making PP plates.
          I have Fontographer 4.1.

          I hope to use it for a "house face." Having matrices cut for it
          that I can use on my Thompson caster is a very long range
          goal. For the foreseeable future, it'll have to be PP plates.

          Thanks,
          Ph. D.

          ----- Originala Mesagxo -----
          De: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>
          >
          > Ph. D.
          >
          > Probably the most appropriate way to proceed is to digitize the font at
          the weight that seems correct to you, testing this as you go on a
          high-resolution laser printer (1200dpi) or preferably, an image setter
          (2400dpi).
          >
          > When you have completed the font you can easily create instances of it
          with Fontographer or FontLab in various weights (thicker or thinner). These
          instances can serve as a form of cheap and dirty way to size optimize a
          font. You can't reduce or expand the weight by much though as the character
          outline points will become disturbed.
          >
          > There is no easy answer to the "how much" question but if the ultimate
          goal is to use digitization for creating a metal face, the photopolymer
          process will provide a fairly useful testing ground. You should be able to
          determine how much expansion will occur as a result of ink gain and
          impression and adjust accordingly.
          >
          > FontLab also allows for interpolation (increasing or decreasing weight and
          other glyph attributes) during the post-creation process through its
          Transformation feature. I haven't tried it for this purpose but from what I
          have seen it might be worth while exploring.
          >
          > Per you interest, I have some material pertaining to this at
          http://bielerpress.blogspot.com/
          >
          > Good luck with it
          >
          > Gerald
          >
          >
          > > I'm digitizing a font. I recall reading that digital fonts need
          > > to be thinned down a bit to allow for ink spread when the
          > > font is made into a photopolymer plate. I am assuming the
          > > same is true if I have matrices cut for casting regular metal
          > > type.
          > >
          > > My question is, how much should I thin the characters?
          > >
          > > Thanks,
          > > Ph. D.
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