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The 3,000 lb problem.

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  • Chris Papasadero
    Well I got this Vandy 219 and i have a big problem: I m a design student with zero cash to move the sonnofathing. The seller is practically giving the press to
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 20, 2004
      Well I got this Vandy 219 and i have a big problem: I'm a design student
      with zero cash to move the sonnofathing. The seller is practically giving
      the press to me (it's in good condition), so I don't want to pass it up -
      but I'm looking at about $500 to move it from his studio to one of several
      options within Portland, OR. A few questions:

      1. Can this thing be broken down in any way to make it movable without a
      crane, forklift, etc? It weighs in at 1.5 tons, ugh.

      2. If it can be broken down, I imagine it'll be in a trillion pieces. Does
      anyone have experience with reassembling something like this?

      3. If it cannot be broken down, are there any suggestions for moving it
      without needing to pay some professionals to do it?

      Any advice/tips on such a thing would be great. I really don't want to turn
      this opportunity down.

      -Chris Papasadero
      Portland, OR.

      ================
      http://fwis.com
      ================
    • Jim Camp
      I ve moved my #219, from San Fran to Phoenix, and then 2 times in Phoenix. The first time I had to rent equipment and move it myself. The cost -- about $250
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 21, 2004
        I've moved my #219, from San Fran to Phoenix, and then
        2 times in Phoenix.

        The first time I had to rent equipment and move it
        myself. The cost -- about $250 and a lot of anxiety.

        The second time I moved the press I hired
        professionals. The cost -- $188 and virtually no
        anxiety.

        If at all possible, hire professionals, even if you
        have to beg, borrow, and steal. A smashed, broken
        press is worthless, and it doesn't take a lot of brain
        power to realize you could hire pros to move your
        press a dozen times for the same price as one trip to
        the emergency room.

        If you move it yourself, don't "break it down". Secure
        the cylinder. Is it on a pallet? If not, I'd secure it
        to one before you move it, then move it on the pallet.
        Remember the press weight -- loading it into the back
        of a small pickup isn't a great idea. Other than that,
        be extremely careful, and, Gid forbid, if it appears
        the press is going to tip, move out of the way as fast
        as you can...do not attempt to "save it". You'll need
        a large forklift and a large truck if you decide to
        move it yourself...I just can't see anything less for
        a #219.

        My 2 cents.

        Best of luck!!

        --- Chris Papasadero <cp@...> wrote:
        > Well I got this Vandy 219 and i have a big problem:
        > I'm a design student
        > with zero cash to move the sonnofathing. The seller
        > is practically giving
        > the press to me (it's in good condition), so I don't
        > want to pass it up -
        > but I'm looking at about $500 to move it from his
        > studio to one of several
        > options within Portland, OR. A few questions:
        >
        > 1. Can this thing be broken down in any way to make
        > it movable without a
        > crane, forklift, etc? It weighs in at 1.5 tons, ugh.
        >
        > 2. If it can be broken down, I imagine it'll be in a
        > trillion pieces. Does
        > anyone have experience with reassembling something
        > like this?
        >
        > 3. If it cannot be broken down, are there any
        > suggestions for moving it
        > without needing to pay some professionals to do it?
        >
        > Any advice/tips on such a thing would be great. I
        > really don't want to turn
        > this opportunity down.
        >
        > -Chris Papasadero
        > Portland, OR.
        >
        > ================
        > http://fwis.com
        > ================
        >
        >
        >
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      • Deep Wood Press
        It s a relatively painless operation with the right tools: ramped or tilt bed trailer, make sure it s rated for the weight (I rented one for $50.00, returned
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 21, 2004
          It's a relatively painless operation with the right tools:

          ramped or tilt bed trailer, make sure it's rated for the weight (I
          rented one for $50.00, returned same day)
          4 or 5 ' lengths of 1.5 or 2" diameter steel pipe (need at least 3)
          4x4 or 4x6 posts and some lag bolts to secure under the feet of the
          press
          a jack from your car to lift the press (to get posts underneath and the
          pipes under those)
          a come-a-long (to help get it up the trailer bed)
          strap clamps and chain to secure the cylinder and the press to the
          trailer
          a J bar or something to use as a lever - move the world

          Provided that you're on level surfaces and don't have to negotiate any
          stairs this is easy. I can move my 219 (old style) by myself around
          the shop if I have to. BTW, the 219 only weighs around 1 ton, big
          difference compared to moving my Little Giant. Your a college student
          so you should have a gaggle of goofy buddies to help especially if you
          make it sound like fun. I've got a group of guys that moan every time
          I call and say I'm moving a press but they have a great time while
          we're at it. As said before and many times in the future be careful,
          take it slow and get the hell out of the way if she tips. Good luck
          and keep us posted.

          Chad
          _____________________________

          Chad Pastotnik
          Deep Wood Press 231.587.0506
          www.deepwoodpress.com
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