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Digital Typefaces

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  • emersongray
    There is an interesting thread that has started over on the LetPress list regarding which typefaces some printers have better luck using to achieve great
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 19 3:09 PM
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      There is an interesting thread that has started over on the LetPress
      list regarding which typefaces some printers have better luck using
      to achieve great printing results versus other typefaces that seem to
      be inherently problematic.

      A couple of days ago I contacted Gerald off-list, after searching the
      PPL archives, to inquire whether a list existed of digital typefaces
      that worked well when printed letterpress. He suggested that I post
      the question to the PPL group at large. Anyone care to share their
      favorites?

      This is meant to be a general question, obviously there are many
      different factors that influence the quality of the final printed
      piece, many of which have already been discussed in this forum.
      So... getting back to digital typefaces, any favorites that work
      especially well with letterpress?

      Thanks!

      Tanya Erickson
    • Gerald Lange
      Tanya If you have not been able to find it here is the URL for Storm Type Foundry http://www.stormtype.com/ Well worth a look. Great work. As of late I ve been
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 19 9:06 PM
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        Tanya

        If you have not been able to find it here is the URL for Storm Type Foundry

        http://www.stormtype.com/

        Well worth a look. Great work.

        As of late I've been exploring some of the late 80s/early 90s digital faces, searching for overlooked "enemics." Picked up a few Lanston and Richard Beatty faces which, with a tiny bit of outline adjustment, work quite well letterpress, with a nice essence of that early twentieth century Goudy-like funk. Beatty had a great knack for capturing this. Recently found a very beautiful cancelleresca bastara (sp?) that he did. One of those faces that never seem to have surfaced properly in the trade. Probably toward the end of his output. Haven't seen any new work of his for many years.

        While I've never made a list of digital faces that work well letterpress, I consider this a very important topic, one that was at the heart of putting this list up in the first place, and I do hope that some useful information will be brought forth by your post.

        All best

        Gerald


        > There is an interesting thread that has started over on the LetPress
        > list regarding which typefaces some printers have better luck using
        > to achieve great printing results versus other typefaces that seem to
        > be inherently problematic.
        >
        > A couple of days ago I contacted Gerald off-list, after searching the
        > PPL archives, to inquire whether a list existed of digital typefaces
        > that worked well when printed letterpress. He suggested that I post
        > the question to the PPL group at large. Anyone care to share their
        > favorites?
        >
        > This is meant to be a general question, obviously there are many
        > different factors that influence the quality of the final printed
        > piece, many of which have already been discussed in this forum.
        > So... getting back to digital typefaces, any favorites that work
        > especially well with letterpress?
        >
        > Thanks!
        >
        > Tanya Erickson
      • Dan Franklin
        Gerald, you mention Storm Type. Have you actually used any of their typefaces? From their specimens, I think they generally capture the spirit of the type --
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 19 10:10 PM
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          Gerald, you mention Storm Type. Have you actually used any of their
          typefaces? From their specimens, I think they generally capture the
          spirit of the type -- in fact, they may even exaggerate it somewhat
          (I'm thinking of Baskerville in particular).

          You also mention Richard Beatty. I tried to track him down 3 or 4
          years ago, without success. He obviously had the eye for Goudy's
          work, and a couple of his faces were used by Stephen Moye in his now
          out-of-print 'Fontographer: Type by Design'. What is the name of the
          cancelleresca bastarda that you like so much? Is it Romulus or some
          such name? Where can one buy this and other Richard Beatty fonts?

          Many or most of the digital faces created from old Monotype faces by
          Monotype tend to be spindly, or 'anemic' as you say, and would be
          excellent choices for letterpress. This has been said before, and not
          just by me.

          Dan Franklin
          Village Typographers
        • Gerald Lange
          Dan A client supplied one of the Storm Czech faces for a project. Wish I could afford a CD of this stuff. I m a sucker for all that Czech Printing Office
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 20 12:13 AM
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            Dan

            A client supplied one of the Storm Czech faces for a project. Wish I
            could afford a CD of this stuff. I'm a sucker for all that Czech
            Printing Office inspired work.

            The Beatty face is based on von Krimpen's Cancellersca Bastarda. Has a
            1996 copyright on it. That was also the last year I had contact with
            him, and the foundry was still active. Yes, Beatty titled it Romus
            Bastarda. As I recall Beatty didn't do directs. He drew the stuff out
            and corrected by eye. Pretty good eye and hand coordination though.

            Beatty's fonts are a bit scattered, no real collection anywhere that
            I've found. I checked the listings here and noted Phil's Fonts and one
            other at a quick glance. There are a few other more obscure
            distributors that carry his stuff as well. I've got a fairly extensive
            listing (in the Links section here) of the various foundries and
            distributors that carry fonts that might be of technical interest.

            There was supposedly another book coming out on Fontographer last
            summer but I haven't heard if it was ever published. By the fellow who
            used to provide technical support for Fontographer when he was at
            Macromedia. There is also a book forthcoming on FontLab. Last year I
            put together a letterpress configuration sequence for FontLab, like
            the one I did for Fontographer. Had it up for a while in the Files
            section. I'll put it back up if there is interest.

            Yeah, many of the fairly straight reproductions of Linotype, Lanston,
            Ludlow, Monotype faces are useful, and, ahem, you are not the only one
            who has said that before!!! In some cases they can be used straight
            out of the can, but I'd recommend a bit of outline adjustment for most
            of them.

            Don't know why I didn't mention this in the previous post but I should
            have. There is at least one digital typeface that was designed
            specifically for letterpress. dfTYPE's Rialto Pressa. It is a pleasure
            to work with. Did an article for Parenthesis about two years ago when
            I talked about this face as well as optimizing digital type for
            letterpress. Some interesting visuals of the technical features of
            Rialto were presented.

            Gerald


            > Gerald, you mention Storm Type. Have you actually used any of their
            > typefaces? From their specimens, I think they generally capture the
            > spirit of the type -- in fact, they may even exaggerate it somewhat
            > (I'm thinking of Baskerville in particular).
            >
            > You also mention Richard Beatty. I tried to track him down 3 or 4
            > years ago, without success. He obviously had the eye for Goudy's
            > work, and a couple of his faces were used by Stephen Moye in his now
            > out-of-print 'Fontographer: Type by Design'. What is the name of the
            > cancelleresca bastarda that you like so much? Is it Romulus or some
            > such name? Where can one buy this and other Richard Beatty fonts?
            >
            > Many or most of the digital faces created from old Monotype faces by
            > Monotype tend to be spindly, or 'anemic' as you say, and would be
            > excellent choices for letterpress. This has been said before, and not
            > just by me.
            >
            > Dan Franklin
            > Village Typographers
          • Peter Fraterdeus
            If I may mention my own Prospera, I ve found that on the occasion that I ve had a mag plate made with it, I ve been very happy with the result. In fact, as it
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 20 8:51 AM
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              If I may mention my own Prospera, I've found that on the occasion that I've had a mag plate made with it, I've been very happy with the result.
              In fact, as it was my first complete design, back in the late 80s, I designed it initially to work with 'low-res' (300dpi) output devices. Later I added a slightly emboldened weight (Book) which produces a better color for digital offset. However, the original (Roman) weight is indeed somewhat 'spindly', and has somewhat exaggerated serifs, which also make for a nice lp impression...

              There's a very small glimpse of the face at http://www.alphabets.com/
              and perhaps, if you're lucky, a more substantial preview and pdf, for those willing to dig through an obsolete website somewhere here:
              http://www.alphabets.com/folpdf/AIProspe.pdf

              This nice PDF catalogue was designed in 1996 for Alphabets by Brian Sooy (http://alteredegofonts.com/)
              The sans headings are my Quanta.
              http://www.alphabets.com/folpdf/AIQuanta.pdf

              The Alphabets, Inc (A*I) redrawing of the Fell Oxford types would probably also find some use in letterpress, (Called Marlowe on the Alphabets homepage, my original name was Oberon. Unfortunately, Oberon was already in use, for a frilly, I suppose 'fairy-like', script.The King of the Fairies (in Midsummernights Dream) I don't think of Oberon as frilly!;-) Two optical sizes were drawn from the models taken from the Oxford Catalogue of (?) 1910 or so...)


              I hope the plug is not out of line ;-)
              Best Vernal Wishes!
              Peter

              At 8:13 AM +0000 2004-03-20, Gerald Lange wrote:
              >Dan
              >
              >A client supplied one of the Storm Czech faces for a project. Wish I
              >could afford a CD of this stuff. I'm a sucker for all that Czech
              >Printing Office inspired work.
              >
              >The Beatty face is based on von Krimpen's Cancellersca Bastarda. Has a
              >1996 copyright on it. That was also the last year I had contact with
              >him, and the foundry was still active. Yes, Beatty titled it Romus
              >Bastarda. As I recall Beatty didn't do directs. He drew the stuff out
              >and corrected by eye. Pretty good eye and hand coordination though.
              >
              >Beatty's fonts are a bit scattered, no real collection anywhere that
              >I've found. I checked the listings here and noted Phil's Fonts and one
              >other at a quick glance. There are a few other more obscure
              >distributors that carry his stuff as well. I've got a fairly extensive
              >listing (in the Links section here) of the various foundries and
              >distributors that carry fonts that might be of technical interest.
              >
              >There was supposedly another book coming out on Fontographer last
              >summer but I haven't heard if it was ever published. By the fellow who
              >used to provide technical support for Fontographer when he was at
              >Macromedia. There is also a book forthcoming on FontLab. Last year I
              >put together a letterpress configuration sequence for FontLab, like
              >the one I did for Fontographer. Had it up for a while in the Files
              >section. I'll put it back up if there is interest.
              >
              >Yeah, many of the fairly straight reproductions of Linotype, Lanston,
              >Ludlow, Monotype faces are useful, and, ahem, you are not the only one
              >who has said that before!!! In some cases they can be used straight
              >out of the can, but I'd recommend a bit of outline adjustment for most
              >of them.
              >
              >Don't know why I didn't mention this in the previous post but I should
              >have. There is at least one digital typeface that was designed
              >specifically for letterpress. dfTYPE's Rialto Pressa. It is a pleasure
              >to work with. Did an article for Parenthesis about two years ago when
              >I talked about this face as well as optimizing digital type for
              >letterpress. Some interesting visuals of the technical features of
              >Rialto were presented.
              >
              >Gerald
              >
              >
              >> Gerald, you mention Storm Type. Have you actually used any of their
              >> typefaces? From their specimens, I think they generally capture the
              >> spirit of the type -- in fact, they may even exaggerate it somewhat
              >> (I'm thinking of Baskerville in particular).
              >>
              >> You also mention Richard Beatty. I tried to track him down 3 or 4
              > > years ago, without success. He obviously had the eye for Goudy's
              >> work, and a couple of his faces were used by Stephen Moye in his now
              >> out-of-print 'Fontographer: Type by Design'. What is the name of the
              >> cancelleresca bastarda that you like so much? Is it Romulus or some
              >> such name? Where can one buy this and other Richard Beatty fonts?
              >>
              >> Many or most of the digital faces created from old Monotype faces by
              >> Monotype tend to be spindly, or 'anemic' as you say, and would be
              >> excellent choices for letterpress. This has been said before, and not
              >> just by me.
              >>
              >> Dan Franklin
              >> Village Typographers
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
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              --
              AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@

              Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com

              http://www.semiotx.com Web Strategy Consulting
              "Words that work."(tm) Communication Design and Typography
            • Paul W Romaine
              This isn t a direct response to the original inquiry but just to note that there are two books, Indie Fonts 1 and Indie Fonts 2, displays of types from
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 20 9:56 AM
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                This isn't a direct response to the original inquiry but just to note
                that there are two books, Indie Fonts 1 and Indie Fonts 2, displays of
                types from independent foundries. (http://www.p22.com/indiefonts/)
                Storm Type has some displays in the second volume.

                As a side note, I see that P22 has issued a digital version of Fred
                Goudy's "Aries" face, which he cut as a proprietary type for the
                private press printer Spencer Kellogg and his "Aries" Press. (It was
                later revised for the Grabhorn Brothers and recut as "Franciscan.")
                I'm intrigued that the set is issued with two decorative fonts: "one
                font of 52 decorative Ornaments & one font that contains 52
                Ampersands." http://www.p22.com/products/goudy.html

                I think Rich Kegler, proprietor of P22, is a member of this list.
                Rich: are these based on the ampersands that Goudy drew for _Diggings
                from Many Ampersandhogs_ (NY: Typophiles, 1936)?

                Paul
                Co-Moderator
              • Richard Kegler
                ... I was unaware of this book (but what an amazing title). The P22 Goudy Ampersands were based on drawings from a few different sources but primarily the 1944
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 21 8:08 AM
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                  > Rich: are these based on the ampersands that Goudy drew for _Diggings
                  > from Many Ampersandhogs_ (NY: Typophiles, 1936)?
                  >
                  I was unaware of this book (but what an amazing title). The P22 Goudy
                  Ampersands were based on drawings from a few different sources but primarily
                  the 1944 Typophiles Type Design & Typography Vol.2

                  RK
                • Paul W Romaine
                  Rich, Thanks for the response. The ampersands are nice, but... Goudy drew an interesting series of ampersands for Diggings that showed the historical
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 21 1:22 PM
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                    Rich,

                    Thanks for the response. The ampersands are nice, but... Goudy drew an
                    interesting series of ampersands for "Diggings" that showed the
                    historical development of the ampersand. The same volume I think has a
                    serious essay by Lehmann-Haupt and one or two other things. Most of
                    the contributions were mock-serious or comic. The early Typophiles
                    books in the 1930s, all rather rare, are assemblages from different
                    printers, on different stock. I think there were 120 copies of
                    "Diggings." I'm certain there's a copy at Rochester Institute of
                    Technology's Cary Collection. (Heck, the Cary Collection may even have
                    Goudy's engravings for the ampersands.) The early Typophile books are
                    quite often a lot of fun. The Typophiles bibliography is online (not
                    complete) here: http://www.typophiles.org/fsbibliography.html

                    Their most important book is probably Janet Ing, _Johann Gutenberg and
                    his Bible_ (1988, still in print). My favorite is the 2-vol Knopf book
                    of writings from the 1950s (o.p.). Oak Knoll distributes for them.

                    Sorry to fall into "Reference Librarian" mode.

                    Paul
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