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Roller Supports

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  • The Indian Hill Press
    Folks: It s interesting to hear people s opinions on roller supports, and how these opinions vary depending on the printer s generation. I would think that
    Message 1 of 31 , Dec 6, 2001
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      Folks:

      It's interesting to hear people's opinions on roller supports, and
      how these opinions vary depending on the printer's generation.

      I would think that roller supports for polymer should be built into
      the plate or at least mounted to the same base, when possible, to
      assure that they are precisely the same height as the image. Brass
      rule may be fairly precise, but some printers use Linotype slugs for
      supports and I know that each Linotype has a slightly different
      opinion of what .918" is.

      My question comes where Windmills are concerned. One would not dare
      allow supports to print on the tympan, because the gripper blades
      slide across with each impression. For this same reason, you'd be
      asking for trouble if you cut away tympan, thus leaving places where
      grippers could snag. I suppose Katie Harper's excellent suggestion of
      a frisket would be the best answer, for Heidelberg users.

      Dan Waters
      Indian Hill Press
    • Austin Jones
      Eric makes a good point. Bearers can be used for a multitude of problems. They can cause problems with impression if not used properly. It is always important
      Message 31 of 31 , Sep 17, 2008
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        Eric makes a good point. Bearers can be used for a multitude of problems.
        They can cause problems with impression if not used properly.

        It is always important to understand the relationship between type, ink
        rollers, and platen. Any change in either requires a change in the others. I
        do more packing behind type than on the platen. I use a variety of type
        fonts. to set up reprints of old broadsides. This type will vary in height
        quite often. My logic - I want the type to be level on top where it comes in
        contact with the ink rollers. I don't care if the feet are even. Packing for
        uneven type on the platen serves the same purpose. I like to get the
        majority of the type inking evenly, then adjust the feet to bring the type
        up to being even. It will now ink even. Platen packing is now obvious.

        I print on flatbed presses quite often with hand brayers. I have never found
        bearers necessary. I use heavy brayers. The brayer has a large core of metal
        which controls the weight and pressure. By using a Brayer with a consistent
        weight, the pressure is consistent. I never apply pressure to the brayer,
        just allow it to ride over the type or image. Perhaps if I were printing
        large expanses of small type I might find a need to support the brayer in
        some instances.

        I think that most of this discussion makes the point that all printers need
        to completely understand the process, equipment, media, and environment
        before applying ink to spatula.

        Austin Jones
        prints by AJ
        Point Pleasant, WV
        austin@...
        HTTP://printsbyaj.com
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "parallel_imp" <Megalonyx@...>
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, September 15, 2008 2:04 PM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Roller Supports


        > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Austin Jones" <austin@...> wrote:
        >>
        >> I just wanted to mention that I use Bearers regularly on my Bobcat
        > Press. [. . .]
        >> I am just attempting to make the point that Bearers have been around
        >> for a long time for use on this type of press.
        >
        > Indeed, Austin. I jumped into this thread so people wouldn't get the
        > idea that those .918" strips just supported the rollers. The same
        > object can be used to compensate for two different problems (in inking
        > and impression
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