Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Question on photopolymer printing.

Expand Messages
  • kx2us
    Hi all, I am new to this groups and press printing in general. I am working on a project which requires optic filters with a few basic color on it. I drew the
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 18, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all,
      I am new to this groups and press printing in general. I am working
      on a project which requires optic filters with a few basic color on
      it. I drew the patten on PhotoShop, and printed on inkjet
      transparency with my HP color printer, but they came out blurry.
      After some research, I realized the way the inkjets work was make the
      filters blurry, and I think photopolymer or flexogrphic printing
      might do the trick. So, would you experts confirm or just give some
      input on this. Thnx.
    • Gerald Lange
      Hello I m guessing a bit at your question here but you seem to be expecting the opposite of what inkjet technology was intended for. And I doubt that
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 19, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello

        I'm guessing a bit at your question here but you seem to be expecting
        the opposite of what inkjet technology was intended for. And I doubt
        that photopolymer would come anywhere near to resolving your needs.

        I don't know what you mean by "optic filters" but yes, the "trick" of
        inkjet printing is an optical blur. I don't know how this would be
        resolved with photopolymer though as, with any pre-digital printing
        process such as letterpress or offset, you would initially need
        distinct b/w patterns (several of them) to create colors, and each
        would need to be laboriously applied in sucession. Not easy, not cheap.

        Have you tried a color laserjet printer?

        Gerald


        > Hi all,
        > I am new to this groups and press printing in general. I am working
        > on a project which requires optic filters with a few basic color on
        > it. I drew the patten on PhotoShop, and printed on inkjet
        > transparency with my HP color printer, but they came out blurry.
        > After some research, I realized the way the inkjets work was make the
        > filters blurry, and I think photopolymer or flexogrphic printing
        > might do the trick. So, would you experts confirm or just give some
        > input on this. Thnx.
      • John G. Henry
        I think you are just trying to lay down a very even, non-blotchy film of ink on a plastic substrate to use as a filter for photography. You may be able to do
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 20, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          I think you are just trying to lay down a very even, non-blotchy film
          of ink on a plastic substrate to use as a filter for photography. You
          may be able to do this with letterpress, but there is always
          variation in image density (particularly when printing on a plastic
          substrate) at the edges of the impression. This is one of the prime
          indicators that a ink film has been printed by letterpress or other
          relief process.

          Have you tried mixing dyes with clear varnish and coating them on the
          plastic or glass surface? You may be ablke to do it with gelatin and
          food coloring for short-term uses.

          John G. Henry
          Cedar Creek Press (and photo fiend)
        • Dave Allen
          I know this is a bit off topic but the way we were able to produce coloured transparencies when I worked at Sheridan College was by the following method.
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 20, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            I know this is a bit off topic but the way we were able to produce coloured transparencies when I worked at Sheridan College was by the following method.
            Screen the coloured image four times to make an image on four differnt monochrome diazo transparencies. That is, with a cyan screen print a cyan diazo image etc., the last screening being a black line image. When you are done you simply sandwich the four images together to get a full colour transparency.
            This could probably be adapted to your inkjet technology using Corel Draw or some other software to produce a monochrome transparency of the image. This will be sharper because the inkjet with not "dither" a pure colour if you get the colours right. You could then either print one of each image and sandwich them or see if your inkjet has the registration capabilities to overprint. I doubt it has so you will probably have to sandwich them.
            Hope this helps. For some reason while I got the copy of Gerald's answer to you I never received your original post so I don't know to whoom I am offering this advice.
            Dave

            At 07:58 AM 2/20/04 -0000, you wrote:
            >Hello
            >
            >I'm guessing a bit at your question here but you seem to be expecting
            >the opposite of what inkjet technology was intended for. And I doubt
            >that photopolymer would come anywhere near to resolving your needs.
            >
            >I don't know what you mean by "optic filters" but yes, the "trick" of
            >inkjet printing is an optical blur. I don't know how this would be
            >resolved with photopolymer though as, with any pre-digital printing
            >process such as letterpress or offset, you would initially need
            >distinct b/w patterns (several of them) to create colors, and each
            >would need to be laboriously applied in sucession. Not easy, not cheap.
            >
            >Have you tried a color laserjet printer?
            >
            >Gerald
            >
            >
            >> Hi all,
            >> I am new to this groups and press printing in general. I am working
            >> on a project which requires optic filters with a few basic color on
            >> it. I drew the patten on PhotoShop, and printed on inkjet
            >> transparency with my HP color printer, but they came out blurry.
            >> After some research, I realized the way the inkjets work was make the
            >> filters blurry, and I think photopolymer or flexogrphic printing
            >> might do the trick. So, would you experts confirm or just give some
            >> input on this. Thnx.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >• To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
            >PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            >• Encountering problems? contact:
            >PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >• To unsubscribe:
            >PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            David Allen
            Beddall Bookbinding Conservation & Restoration
            840 Snowdrop Avenue
            Victoria, British Columbia
            CANADA V8Z 2N4
            (250) 888-9380
            http://www.webvictoria.com/beddall
          • David Goodrich
            I must say I have not been able to discern the objective here, but if it simply to obtain colored sheets of plastic, why not go to a stage lighting supply
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 20, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              I must say I have not been able to discern the objective here, but if it
              simply to obtain colored sheets of plastic, why not go to a stage lighting
              supply house and get sheets of gelatin or plastic used for lights? It is
              made in a very wide array of colors.

              David.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: John G. Henry [mailto:JohnH@...]
              Sent: Friday, February 20, 2004 1:00 PM
              To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Question on photopolymer printing.


              I think you are just trying to lay down a very even, non-blotchy film
              of ink on a plastic substrate to use as a filter for photography. You
              may be able to do this with letterpress, but there is always
              variation in image density (particularly when printing on a plastic
              substrate) at the edges of the impression. This is one of the prime
              indicators that a ink film has been printed by letterpress or other
              relief process.

              Have you tried mixing dyes with clear varnish and coating them on the
              plastic or glass surface? You may be ablke to do it with gelatin and
              food coloring for short-term uses.

              John G. Henry
              Cedar Creek Press (and photo fiend)




              • To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
              PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              • Encountering problems? contact:
              PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
              • To unsubscribe:
              PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              Yahoo! Groups Links
            • kx2us
              Yes, this is what I want to do; but the problem is, I cannot use stage products as they are single colored. The requirement with my project has 2 basic colors
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 22, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Yes, this is what I want to do; but the problem is, I cannot use
                stage products as they are single colored. The requirement with my
                project has 2 basic colors on it with very small pattens.


                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David Goodrich"
                <davidgoodrich@a...> wrote:
                > I must say I have not been able to discern the objective here, but
                if it
                > simply to obtain colored sheets of plastic, why not go to a stage
                lighting
                > supply house and get sheets of gelatin or plastic used for lights?
                It is
                > made in a very wide array of colors.
                >
                > David.
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: John G. Henry [mailto:JohnH@i...]
                > Sent: Friday, February 20, 2004 1:00 PM
                > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Question on photopolymer printing.
                >
                >
                > I think you are just trying to lay down a very even, non-blotchy
                film
                > of ink on a plastic substrate to use as a filter for photography.
                You
                > may be able to do this with letterpress, but there is always
                > variation in image density (particularly when printing on a plastic
                > substrate) at the edges of the impression. This is one of the prime
                > indicators that a ink film has been printed by letterpress or other
                > relief process.
                >
                > Have you tried mixing dyes with clear varnish and coating them on
                the
                > plastic or glass surface? You may be ablke to do it with gelatin and
                > food coloring for short-term uses.
                >
                > John G. Henry
                > Cedar Creek Press (and photo fiend)
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ?To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
                > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                > ?Encountering problems? contact:
                > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
                > ?To unsubscribe:
                > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
              • kx2us
                Thanks John for your input. Indeed, I am trying to lay down a very even, non-blotchy film of thin ink on a plastic substrate to use as a filter. Another
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 22, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thanks John for your input. Indeed, I am trying to lay down a very
                  even, non-blotchy film of thin ink on a plastic substrate to use as a
                  filter. Another question. How bad is the density variation at the
                  edges, or it's really depended on the thinness of the ink?


                  --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "John G. Henry" <JohnH@i...>
                  wrote:
                  > I think you are just trying to lay down a very even, non-blotchy
                  film
                  > of ink on a plastic substrate to use as a filter for photography.
                  You
                  > may be able to do this with letterpress, but there is always
                  > variation in image density (particularly when printing on a plastic
                  > substrate) at the edges of the impression. This is one of the prime
                  > indicators that a ink film has been printed by letterpress or other
                  > relief process.
                  >
                  > Have you tried mixing dyes with clear varnish and coating them on
                  the
                  > plastic or glass surface? You may be ablke to do it with gelatin
                  and
                  > food coloring for short-term uses.
                  >
                  > John G. Henry
                  > Cedar Creek Press (and photo fiend)
                • arizonaprinter
                  you might try creating the patterns on your computer and having a Dye sublimation print done (not an overhead) made. A service beureo that makes backlit signs
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 22, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    you might try creating the patterns on your computer and having a Dye
                    sublimation print done (not an overhead) made. A service beureo that makes
                    backlit signs for tradeshow can do this very cost effective about 15 to 20
                    each. These are photo quality full size pieces.

                    From: "kx2us" <kx2us@...>
                    Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Mon, 23 Feb 2004 02:56:08 -0000
                    To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Question on photopolymer printing.


                    Yes, this is what I want to do; but the problem is, I cannot use
                    stage products as they are single colored. The requirement with my
                    project has 2 basic colors on it with very small pattens.


                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David Goodrich"
                    <davidgoodrich@a...> wrote:
                    > I must say I have not been able to discern the objective here, but
                    if it
                    > simply to obtain colored sheets of plastic, why not go to a stage
                    lighting
                    > supply house and get sheets of gelatin or plastic used for lights?
                    It is
                    > made in a very wide array of colors.
                    >
                    > David.
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: John G. Henry [mailto:JohnH@i...]
                    > Sent: Friday, February 20, 2004 1:00 PM
                    > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Question on photopolymer printing.
                    >
                    >
                    > I think you are just trying to lay down a very even, non-blotchy
                    film
                    > of ink on a plastic substrate to use as a filter for photography.
                    You
                    > may be able to do this with letterpress, but there is always
                    > variation in image density (particularly when printing on a plastic
                    > substrate) at the edges of the impression. This is one of the prime
                    > indicators that a ink film has been printed by letterpress or other
                    > relief process.
                    >
                    > Have you tried mixing dyes with clear varnish and coating them on
                    the
                    > plastic or glass surface? You may be ablke to do it with gelatin and
                    > food coloring for short-term uses.
                    >
                    > John G. Henry
                    > Cedar Creek Press (and photo fiend)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ?To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
                    > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    > ?Encountering problems? contact:
                    > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
                    > ?To unsubscribe:
                    > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links



                    • To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
                    PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    • Encountering problems? contact:
                    PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
                    • To unsubscribe:
                    PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com


                    Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ADVERTISEMENT
                    Click Here
                    <http://rd.yahoo.com/SIG=12c5hs87e/M=274551.4550177.5761904.1261774/D=egroup
                    web/S=1706389862:HM/EXP=1077591375/A=2019528/R=2/*http://ad.doubleclick.net/
                    jump/N3349.yahoo1/B1282054.27;abr=!ie4;abr=!ie5;sz=300x250;code=18634;dcopt=
                    rcl;ord=1077504975530760?>



                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                    To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PPLetterpress/

                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    <mailto:PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>

                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
                    <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • John G. Henry
                    ... You will find some edge effect at teh edge when printing plastic. Keeping the ink film as thin as possible and keeping the impression as light as
                    Message 9 of 11 , Feb 23, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment
                      > How bad is the density variation at the

                      You will find some "edge effect" at teh edge when printing plastic.
                      Keeping the ink film as thin as possible and keeping the impression
                      as light as possible will diminish the edge effect.

                      If printing patterns on a color background, perhaps this heavier ink
                      film at the edge will not be objectionable.

                      Getting off-topic for this list:

                      The dye-sub print may be good, but if your factor of enlargement when
                      projected is great, anything will show. Can you create the pattern
                      effect you wish with a paint on illustration baord and then use an
                      Ektachrome to reproduce it?

                      John Henry
                    • kx2us
                      Thank you all for your input. I will try a few different methods you guys suggested. Unfortunally, new technology doesn t cut it in this little project, and I
                      Message 10 of 11 , Feb 24, 2004
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thank you all for your input. I will try a few different methods you
                        guys suggested. Unfortunally, new technology doesn't cut it in this
                        little project, and I have discovered what "old" tech can still offer.
                      • Gerald Lange
                        The older the tech, the better. Go back far enough, it s just a tool in the hand. And yet, the offerings were so much more so. :-) Gerald
                        Message 11 of 11 , Feb 29, 2004
                        • 0 Attachment
                          The older the tech, the better. Go back far enough, it's just a tool
                          in the hand. And yet, the "offerings" were so much more so. :-)

                          Gerald


                          > Thank you all for your input. I will try a few different methods you
                          > guys suggested. Unfortunally, new technology doesn't cut it in this
                          > little project, and I have discovered what "old" tech can still offer.
                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.