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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: roller supports

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  • Katie Harper
    There are also those who recommend cutting a frisket for the roller bearers to print on. The frisket goes on top of the printing sheet on a cylinder press and
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 5, 2001
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      There are also those who recommend cutting a frisket for the roller bearers
      to print on. The frisket goes on top of the printing sheet on a cylinder
      press and is attached to the grippers on a platen press. There was a similar
      discussion not long ago on the LETPRESS list, so the details may be found
      the archives.

      http://listserv.unb.ca/archives/letpress.html


      Katie Harper
      Ars Brevis Press
      Cincinnati, OH
      513-233-9588

      Remember: Book arts will save the world!



      > From: "bielerpr" <bieler@...>
      > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wed, 05 Dec 2001 15:17:32 -0000
      > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: roller supports
      >
      > Dear Brian
      >
      > I began using roller supports to solve an inking problem on a job way
      > back in 1979. I have rarely since printed without them. They provide a
      > higher level of control over the inking of the form. The technique is
      > taken from the common practice on the iron handpress.
      >
      > No, essentially, the carriage does not support the rollers well
      > enough. Presses age, things change, parts wear down by the thousands
      > of an inch. You cannot put your trust solely with the machine because
      > you cannot know it is true. It is useful to develop guides, templates,
      > patterns of working, etc., that provide you with reference. Such
      > references are important for any form of craft work. You can't trust a
      > measuring device until you know it is true, or conversely, that its
      > measure provides you the exacting reference you require.
      >
      > Yes, the rule prints on the tympan. You can cut the tympan away in
      > this area so that the rule does not print to it or you can be very
      > very careful. Personally, I trust the rule printing to the tympan. I
      > like the relationship. It also provides a certain reference regarding
      > ink-buildup. I use it as a gauge, as another control point. It is my
      > problem to ensure that I do not drag the paper across the ink strip. I
      > guess if I cannot bother to be careful about that, I'd say its
      > probably not a good idea that I think of myself as a fine printer!
      >
      > Ger
      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@y..., Brian Molanphy <bmolanphy@c...> wrote:
      >> forgive my ignorance, but i don't get this. what is the purpose of the rule?
      >> doesn't it print somewhere, on tympan or paper? why do rollers need support?
      >> doesn't the carriage support them well enough?
      >>
      >> brian
      >>
      >>> ----------
      >>> From: Gerald Lange
      >>> Reply To: PPLetterpress@y...
      >>> Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2001 8:38 PM
      >>> To: PPLetterpress@y...
      >>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] inks
      >>>
      >>> Dear David
      >>>
      >>> On the cylinder flatbed I use 36 point rule as roller supports running the
      >>> length of the press bed for both metal and photopolymer. These run fairly
      >>> close to the rails to prevent ink stray (on the printed paper).
      >>>
      >>> Like your idea. Probably more practical with the hand press? You could
      >>> also
      >>> have sets of these made, at various heights of plate thickness, to test
      >>> how
      >>> each might work with your particular inking practices, and with different
      >>> kinds of forms, type, solids, etc.
      >>>
      >>> Let us know how it works out.
      >>>
      >>> Gerald
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> David Goodrich wrote:
      >>>>
      >>>> Harold's comments on roller pressure are striking a raw nerve. I print
      >>> on
      >>>> an iron hand press and have been planning to print some polymer plates
      >>> using
      >>>> a magnetic backing. Has anyone had any experience in using roller
      >>> bearers
      >>>> with polymer plates? I have been considering getting some long polymer
      >>>> strips made up about 1/4 inch wide which would be the equivalent to 18
      >>> point
      >>>> rules. These could be positioned on the magnetic backing to serve as
      >>> roller
      >>>> bearers. Has anyone else tried this?
      >>>>
      >>>> David Goodrich
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      >>> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >>>
      >>>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
    • Fritz Klinke
      Typically reproduction proofs that were pulled on proof presses used bearers on each side of the type form. Any typography shop I worked with in the days of
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 5, 2001
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        Typically reproduction proofs that were pulled on proof presses used bearers
        on each side of the type form. Any typography shop I worked with in the days
        of hot metal pulled their proofs with bearers, and they usually had the name
        of the shop cast in the bearer so we could tell who provided the type. The
        bearer printed on the paper, but since we used the proof for paste-up, it
        was simple to cut off the excess paper with the bearer image. The bearer
        extended in front of the image area to take the initial impression of the
        cylinder, and the same at the tail end of the proof. That way the leading
        edge of the type or illustration didn't dig into the paper. And on the tail
        end of the copy, the cylinder tends to drop off the last edge of impression.

        36 pt cast rule works, and new 36 pt brass rule can also be had. The brass
        will last longer, but is considerably more expensive.

        Fritz Klinke, NA Graphics
        1314 Greene Street, P.O. Box 467
        Silverton, Colorado 81433 USA
        970-387-0212, fax 970-387-0127
        nagraph@...

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Brian Molanphy" <bmolanphy@...>
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, December 04, 2001 10:06 PM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] roller supports


        > forgive my ignorance, but i don't get this. what is the purpose of the
        rule?
        > doesn't it print somewhere, on tympan or paper? why do rollers need
        support?
        > doesn't the carriage support them well enough?
        >
        > brian
        >
        > > ----------
        > > From: Gerald Lange
        > > Reply To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Tuesday, December 4, 2001 8:38 PM
        > > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] inks
        > >
        > > Dear David
        > >
        > > On the cylinder flatbed I use 36 point rule as roller supports running
        the
        > > length of the press bed for both metal and photopolymer. These run
        fairly
        > > close to the rails to prevent ink stray (on the printed paper).
        > >
        > > Like your idea. Probably more practical with the hand press? You could
        > > also
        > > have sets of these made, at various heights of plate thickness, to test
        > > how
        > > each might work with your particular inking practices, and with
        different
        > > kinds of forms, type, solids, etc.
        > >
        > > Let us know how it works out.
        > >
        > > Gerald
        > >
        > >
        > > David Goodrich wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Harold's comments on roller pressure are striking a raw nerve. I
        print
        > > on
        > > > an iron hand press and have been planning to print some polymer plates
        > > using
        > > > a magnetic backing. Has anyone had any experience in using roller
        > > bearers
        > > > with polymer plates? I have been considering getting some long
        polymer
        > > > strips made up about 1/4 inch wide which would be the equivalent to 18
        > > point
        > > > rules. These could be positioned on the magnetic backing to serve as
        > > roller
        > > > bearers. Has anyone else tried this?
        > > >
        > > > David Goodrich
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
        http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • Gerald Lange
        David If you have plates made with the bearer strips placed at one side, with the remaining blank area left to overhang the base, this would greatly
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 6, 2001
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          David

          If you have plates made with the "bearer strips" placed at one side, with the
          remaining blank area left to overhang the base, this would greatly facilitate
          pickup. Probably not much different than the two-part bearers Allen discussed
          in _Printing with the Handpress_.

          Ger

          David Goodrich wrote:
          >
          > A thought that occurred to me regarding using polymer strips with a magnetic
          > base is that the bearer strips could actually be removed for each
          > impression. Although this would be slow and messy, it could solve really
          > difficult problems.
        • David Goodrich
          Brian, I think a number of people have responded better than I could have. Let me just add that on an iron hand press there are no carriages, rails, etc.
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 6, 2001
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            Brian,
            I think a number of people have responded better than I could have. Let me
            just add that on an iron hand press there are no carriages, rails, etc.
            Inking has to be done with a hand roller and it is very hard to do evenly
            without roller bearers. It is also normal, though not absolutely necessary,
            to use a frisket. Although roller bearers will print on the tympan (or
            frisket), I avoid putting packing over the bearers to reduce the impact. A
            thought that occurred to me regarding using polymer strips with a magnetic
            base is that the bearer strips could actually be removed for each
            impression. Although this would be slow and messy, it could solve really
            difficult problems.

            David.
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