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Re: [PPLetterpress] Metal Type ID

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  • E Roustom
    http://www.omniglot.com/writing/armenian.htm the two letters look almost Armenian - above link somewhat useful. Elias
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 6, 2004
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      http://www.omniglot.com/writing/armenian.htm

      the two letters look almost Armenian - above link somewhat useful.

      Elias
    • Gerald Lange
      I made some plates for a calligrapher today and when she came in to pick them up and we had chatted a bit, I showed her the mystery type. Oh, she says,
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 14, 2004
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        I made some plates for a calligrapher today and when she came in to
        pick them up and we had chatted a bit, I showed her the mystery type.
        "Oh," she says, "India type." She knew the letterforms accents and
        other characteristics quite well and was quite sure. Even gave me a
        reference. So I gave them to her!!! Mystery solved, I think.

        Gerald
      • typetom@aol.com
        In a message dated 1/14/2004 bieler@worldnet.att.net writes:
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 14, 2004
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          In a message dated 1/14/2004 bieler@... writes:
          << I made some plates for a calligrapher today and when she came in to
          pick them up and we had chatted a bit, I showed her the mystery type.
          "Oh," she says, "India type." She knew the letterforms accents and
          other characteristics quite well and was quite sure. Even gave me a
          reference. So I gave them to her!!! Mystery solved, I think. >>

          I'd love to know the reference, and/or any further info you come up with. The
          answer makes sense on many levels, though I'd still really like to see the
          whole design and have the name and foundry and possible date.
          Thanks, Tom


          Tom Parson
          Now It's Up To You Publications
          157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
          (303) 777-8951
          http://members.aol.com/typetom
        • Gerald Lange
          Tom She referred me to Diringer. I assume she meant The Book Before Printing (Dover) or its earlier printing (The Hand-Produced Book). Maybe there is another
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 14, 2004
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            Tom

            She referred me to Diringer. I assume she meant The Book Before Printing
            (Dover) or its earlier printing (The Hand-Produced Book). Maybe there is
            another Diringer as I have the earlier book and my unfamiliarity with
            the India letterforms doesn't show me what she obviously saw. Basically
            just a lead as she was thinking letterforms not type. So the foundry
            (HS) and the specific design, date of issue, etc., still not found.

            I don't recall ever seeing specimens of type from an India foundry other
            than those that were producing Western knockoffs. Not unusual though as
            a lot of the Eastern European, even the Spanish and Italian specimen
            books, or even the German fraktur types, don't see a lot of travel in
            the Anglo-American sphere.

            I have a very nice Italian type foundry book from the mid thirties, on a
            thickness level to the BBS of about that time. But much more
            sophisticated. With faces and forms not at all common but quite
            refreshing. Other than the work that Dieter Speffmann is/was doing with
            the German materials, you don't see an awful lot of digital effort going
            on in trying to resurrect any of this.

            Gerald

            typetom@... wrote:
            > In a message dated 1/14/2004 bieler@... writes:
            > << I made some plates for a calligrapher today and when she came in to
            > pick them up and we had chatted a bit, I showed her the mystery type.
            > "Oh," she says, "India type." She knew the letterforms accents and
            > other characteristics quite well and was quite sure. Even gave me a
            > reference. So I gave them to her!!! Mystery solved, I think. >>
            >
            > I'd love to know the reference, and/or any further info you come up with. The
            > answer makes sense on many levels, though I'd still really like to see the
            > whole design and have the name and foundry and possible date.
            > Thanks, Tom
            >
          • Norman L McKnight
            David Diringer: The Alphabet: a key to the history of mankind. 2 vols. London & New York 1948 [1st], 1949 [2nd], and 1952 [3rd reprint]and also in Italian,
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 15, 2004
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              David Diringer: The Alphabet: a key to the history of mankind. 2 vols.
              London & New York 1948 [1st], 1949 [2nd], and 1952 [3rd reprint]and
              also in Italian, Florence [1937]

              I believe there was also a one volume version and more than one
              edition of the first. It sells for about 250.00 if you can find one
              in good condition with dj. I don't have one to look at, but looking
              through the many alphabets shown in my Fry's Pantographia (1799) there
              are several which have writing characteristics in which such a char-
              acter would seem at home, but I don't find it there. The closest I
              came to finding one was Tartaric #5 and #7 which was used by the
              Manchou Tartars. op. cit. p. 290. Sorry I don't have a scanner, but
              this is likely to remain a mystery. In looking for an exact match to
              the characters we forget what is obvious in the variants shown in
              some of the polyglot tomes such as the one mentioned above, that
              there are variants of the same letter which don't exactly match each
              other; thus I may be looking at it without realizing it. It is, as
              they say, now out of your hands anyway. Your calligrapher friend will
              likely take up the challenge.

              Norman L. McKnight
              Philoxenia Press
              Berkeley
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