Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [PPLetterpress] hardness of magnesium vs. polymer

Expand Messages
  • typetom@aol.com
    Hi Chris, I use the MS152 Miraclon .060 plate (1.26mm relief, .26mm steel backing) from Gene Becker, with the metal .858 magnetic bases from NA Graphics.
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 16, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Chris,
      I use the MS152 Miraclon .060" plate (1.26mm relief, .26mm steel backing)
      from Gene Becker, with the metal .858" magnetic bases from NA Graphics. (Boxcar's
      system looks to me like a fine alternative, with the advantage that it's
      easier to cut the polyester plate material).

      It is possible to dent a magnesium plate when printing on lumpy paper, but
      very difficult to damage photopolymer. I turned to photopolymers because of
      frequent requests a couple of years ago, to print on Indian handmade papers which
      have lumps of grass and flowers in the paper. I was damaging lead type and
      occasionally denting a mag cut. I have not observed appreciable wear of magnesium
      in ordinary short runs, but specific dents. With photopolymer, an extreme hit
      may result in a dent to the packing and even a dent to the steel backing and
      the magnetic surface, but no apparent damage to the polymer. On such
      occasions, I have simply shifted the packing, and at times even pulled the plate off
      the magnetic base and hammered it flat again and then resumed printing without
      trouble. I observe no wear from normal heavy printing with polymer plates.

      The difficulties for photopolymers are with good contact during exposure,
      exposure time, washout, and with having a solid uniform base for mounting. (Not
      to mention software glitches and getting negs from a service bureau). The
      plates also tend to curl and become brittle on the shelf (as they age and dry), so
      are not always available for later re-use. Of course they also lack the
      advantage of hand-set type, which allows correction of typos and spacing
      adjustments during the print run!

      Best wishes, Tom

      Tom Parson
      Now It's Up To You Publications
      157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
      (303) 777-8951
      http://members.aol.com/typetom
    • E Roustom
      How hard exactly are you hitting it??? This may be a question about packing - how soft and/or cushy is the packing you re using? The softer it is the more
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 16, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        How hard exactly are you hitting it???

        This may be a question about packing - how soft and/or cushy is the packing
        you're using? The softer it is the more stress on the type/plate. I print
        with a fair (not outrageous) amount of impression and I've never had the
        problem you describe with either polymer or magnesium. Even when doubles
        feed, or feeding accidents - my plates seems to survive.

        If your mag is giving out, it could be you (pressmanship) or it could be
        your platemaker is over etching. You could also try 11 pt. rather than 16
        guage plates.

        The harder polymer plates (LSL or HSB 145 Jet) that I get from NA Graphics -
        or can be had from Boxcar have yet to fail me for impression or durability
        (up to 10,000 impressions), except with some Indian handmade papers that are
        full of fiber knots and whatever else falls into the vat... recent bad
        experience.

        Poorly processed plates (even of the hard kind) can give out.

        Try try again.

        > From: "sternandfaye" <flywheel@...>
        > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 09:21:54 -0800
        > To: pp letterpress listserve <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: [PPLetterpress] hardness of magnesium vs. polymer
        >
        > When clients ask for deep impression, I'm happy to oblige. I love the dent.
        > But the magnesium cuts I use (mounted on honeycomb base) really show the
        > wear after a few hundred impressions. I just did a job where I could see
        > (under the loop) that the hairlines of the script face used were really
        > going fast. So I'm wondering, is photopolymer harder and more able to
        > withstand the heavy hit?
        >
        > I know that copper dies are harder, but they're also more expensive and
        > usually not an option. I tried the Boxcar plates for a couple of jobs last
        > year, and while there was a lot to like about them, I wasn't able to give
        > the job the really deep impression desired. Now that Boxcar has a new base
        > and a thicker plate with more shoulder, I'm tempted to give them another
        > try.
        >
        > Any observations from former magnesium users?
        >
        > Chris Stern
        > Stern & Faye Printers
        > 37607 Cape Horn Road
        > Sedro-Woolley, WA 98284
        > 360.826.5306
        > http://www.sternandfaye.com
        >
        >
        > ? To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
        > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > ? Encountering problems? contact:
        > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
        > ? To unsubscribe:
        > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        > To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PPLetterpress/
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • philoxenia@earthlink.net
        I note with interest that zinc blocks are seldom mentioned; using only photocopies I made myself of early, very fine engravings and even musical notation and
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 16, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          I note with interest that zinc blocks are seldom mentioned; using
          only photocopies I made myself of early, very fine engravings and
          even musical notation and accompanying text I have had zinc blocks
          made and printed them with perfect results. They last forever, and
          they need no special care. They are, I'm sure, harder by far than
          the magnesium blocks. Zinc photoengravings may be had from one of
          the last family operated businesses still catering to letterpress
          folk:

          Lambert Engraving, 819 Pearl Street, Sioux City IA 51101
          fax & telephone: 712 258 7148

          The issue of trimming easily the polymers is probably a consideration,
          but for general letterpress block and for those not yet using polymer
          I can't imagine passing up this one.

          Norman McKnight
          Philoxenia Press
          Berkeley
        • Eileen O Malley Callahan
          I d love to get zincs: no oxidation, and lasts forever, but I understand there are huge problems with processing zincs: that is, huge problems with the toxic
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 16, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            I'd love to get zincs: no oxidation, and lasts
            forever, but I understand there are huge problems
            with processing zincs: that is, huge problems
            with the toxic waste byproducts, and hence, a
            desire NOT to produce run off from the process
            that would poison the water has led to the demise
            of that aspect of the trade. Yes?

            And what about magnesium? What by-products there?

            thanks,

            Eileen





            I note with interest that zinc blocks are seldom mentioned; using
            only photocopies I made myself of early, very fine engravings and
            even musical notation and accompanying text I have had zinc blocks
            made and printed them with perfect results. They last forever, and
            they need no special care. They are, I'm sure, harder by far than
            the magnesium blocks. Zinc photoengravings may be had from one of
            the last family operated businesses still catering to letterpress
            folk:

            Lambert Engraving, 819 Pearl Street, Sioux City IA 51101
            fax & telephone: 712 258 7148

            The issue of trimming easily the polymers is probably a consideration,
            but for general letterpress block and for those not yet using polymer
            I can't imagine passing up this one.

            Norman McKnight
            Philoxenia Press
            Berkeley



            • To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
            PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            • Encountering problems? contact:
            PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
            • To unsubscribe:
            PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            ADVERTISEMENT
            <http://rd.yahoo.com/SIG=12c0kl303/M=267637.4116732.5333197.1261774/D=egroupweb/S=1706389862:HM/EXP=1071695811/A=1853619/R=0/*http://www.netflix.com/Default?mqso=60178356&partid=4116732>




            Yahoo! Groups Links

            To visit your group on the web, go to:
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PPLetterpress/>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PPLetterpress/

            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            <mailto:PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
            <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>Yahoo! Terms
            of Service.


            --


            Eileen Grace O Malley Callahan
            Office of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies
            301 Campbell Hall
            University of California, Berkeley
            (510) 643-2173
            callahan@...

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.