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ink skinning

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  • Norman L McKnight
    The problem of ink developing a skin is annoying, and the use of ink in tubes is a practical way to avoid this if you are a printer who does relatively short
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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      The problem of ink developing a skin is annoying, and the use of
      ink in tubes is a practical way to avoid this if you are a printer
      who does relatively short runs. All of my colors except organic
      vermillion (which only comes in one pound cans) is in tubes and I
      have had no loss whatever.
      The organic vermillion was a problem however, and skin papers did
      not really help much. I lost far too much ink (organic vermillion
      is about $40.00 a pound)in a color I only seldom used. Then I got
      the bright idea of storing fresh cans in a pyrex food storage con-
      tainer with their tight plastic lids. I haven't had the slightest
      trace of skin since then, so this method might be useful rather than
      cutting and oiling and folding skin papers. I still use the skin
      papers provided by Daniel Smith, but they lift perfectly and reveal
      fresh ink without a trace of skin.
      I'm hoping to try Handschy's two-part gold late this month or early
      January on dampened Arches Cover, black.

      Norman McKnight
      Philoxenia Press
      Berkeley
    • Kat Ran Press
      Yes, tubes sound like a fine idea, but how does one get leftover ink back in the tube? Michael Russem -- Kat Ran Press 221 Pine Street #108 Florence,
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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        Yes, tubes sound like a fine idea, but
        how does one get leftover ink back
        in the tube?


        Michael Russem
        --
        Kat Ran Press
        221 Pine Street #108
        Florence, Massachusetts 01062
        413.584.1152 phone & fax
        katran@...
        http://www.katranpress.com
      • paul white
        What about putting some mineral spirits on the ink in the can and then pouring it off and wicking the remainder with a rag? -Paul White ... [Non-text portions
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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          What about putting some mineral spirits on the ink in the can and then
          pouring it off and wicking the remainder with a rag?
          -Paul White

          On Dec 4, 2003, at 10:16 AM, Kathleen Whalen wrote:

          > Try a mylar 'lid' in the can. I don't know whether it will work on
          > organic
          > vermilion, but it seems to work on the oil based inks I use. Mind you,
          > I too
          > have given up on ink in cans in favour of transferring everything to
          > tubes,
          > apart that is for black which seems to get used up quickly enough once
          > a new
          > book is started - then I tube any left when the book's done, ready for
          > continued use for odd jobbing work.
          >
          >
          > Graham Moss
          > Incline Press
          > 36 Bow Street
          > Oldham OL1 1SJ� England
          > (44) 0161 627 1966
          > http://www.inclinepress.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kathleen Whalen
          Try a mylar lid in the can. I don t know whether it will work on organic vermilion, but it seems to work on the oil based inks I use. Mind you, I too have
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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            Try a mylar 'lid' in the can. I don't know whether it will work on organic
            vermilion, but it seems to work on the oil based inks I use. Mind you, I too
            have given up on ink in cans in favour of transferring everything to tubes,
            apart that is for black which seems to get used up quickly enough once a new
            book is started - then I tube any left when the book's done, ready for
            continued use for odd jobbing work.


            Graham Moss
            Incline Press
            36 Bow Street
            Oldham OL1 1SJ England
            (44) 0161 627 1966
            http://www.inclinepress.com
          • Peter Fraterdeus
            I ve had good luck in the past scraping reserve ink off the mixing plate onto a large (8x8 in) scrap of 4mil plastic sheeting, folding and sealing the sheet
            Message 5 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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              I've had good luck in the past scraping reserve ink off the mixing plate onto a large (8x8 in) scrap of 4mil plastic sheeting, folding and sealing the sheet with tape.
              This will keep for a week or so, and with 'rubberbased' inks, will keep months.
              P

              At 12:06 PM -0500 2003-12-04, Kat Ran Press wrote:
              >Yes, tubes sound like a fine idea, but
              >how does one get leftover ink back
              >in the tube?
              >
              >
              >Michael Russem
              >--
              >Kat Ran Press
              >221 Pine Street #108
              >Florence, Massachusetts 01062
              >413.584.1152 phone & fax
              >katran@...
              >http://www.katranpress.com
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >ï To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
              >PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
              >ï Encountering problems? contact:
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              --
              AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@

              Peter Fraterdeus http://www.fraterdeus.com

              http://www.semiotx.com Web Strategy Consulting
              "Words that work."(tm) Communication Design and Typography
            • mike.jacobs
              Old used metal litho plates provide a handy palatte for rolling out letterpress ink, They can also be use for mixing and if folded in half with any remaining
              Message 6 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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                Old used metal litho plates provide a handy palatte for rolling out
                letterpress ink, They can also be use for mixing and if folded in half with
                any remaining ink inside, the ink will keep for an amazing period.
                Mike.
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Kat Ran Press" <katran@...>
                To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2003 5:06 PM
                Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] ink skinning



                Yes, tubes sound like a fine idea, but
                how does one get leftover ink back
                in the tube?


                Michael Russem
                --
                Kat Ran Press
                221 Pine Street #108
                Florence, Massachusetts 01062
                413.584.1152 phone & fax
                katran@...
                http://www.katranpress.com



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              • E Roustom
                Van Son s recommendation for their oil based inks is a sheet of Saran Wrap (has to be this brand - the others don t work for some reason). Cut a piece out that
                Message 7 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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                  Van Son's recommendation for their oil based inks is a sheet of Saran Wrap
                  (has to be this brand - the others don't work for some reason). Cut a piece
                  out that is considerably larger than the can, center over open can, press in
                  with circular cardboard cut out that comes with ink, tight, and your ink is
                  sealed up. Works well.

                  Van Son put out a small publication on their inks years ago, with many
                  helpful hints (mostly for offset) and technical information describing all
                  the inks they make. If you can find one, it's an enjoyable read, and a great
                  reference.

                  Elias
                • Norman L McKnight
                  After reviewing, but not trying, the various methods outlined, i.e. stuffing ink back into tubes, covering the ink with mineral spirits, cutting rounds of
                  Message 8 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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                    After reviewing, but not trying, the various methods outlined, i.e.
                    stuffing ink back into tubes, covering the ink with mineral spirits,
                    cutting rounds of Saran Wrap and rounds of cardboard, and finally
                    storing extra ink outside the can in "off-site" wafers of litho
                    board and celo tape, I think I will remain with simply lifting the
                    lid off the Pyrex food storage bowl and access perfect ink without
                    the additional efforts which would tax my advanced decrepitude.

                    I have been using this method for six months or more, and the ink
                    is as fresh and ready as the day I bought it. No skimming, no other
                    tasks but to place it on the stone and give it some exercise. It
                    does require replacing the lid on the can and the Pyrex cannister,
                    but I can usually manage that.

                    Norman L. McKnight
                    Philoxenia Press
                    Berkeley
                  • E Roustom
                    Are you sure this method works with all inks, or just this one particular ink? How about ones with driers? Can you be more specific about the pyrex brand? I d
                    Message 9 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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                      Are you sure this method works with all inks, or just this one particular
                      ink? How about ones with driers?

                      Can you be more specific about the pyrex brand? I'd like to try it.

                      e.

                      > From: "Norman L McKnight" <philoxenia@...>
                      > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      > Date: Thu, 04 Dec 2003 23:43:03 -0000
                      > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: [PPLetterpress] ink skinning
                      >
                      > After reviewing, but not trying, the various methods outlined, i.e.
                      > stuffing ink back into tubes, covering the ink with mineral spirits,
                      > cutting rounds of Saran Wrap and rounds of cardboard, and finally
                      > storing extra ink outside the can in "off-site" wafers of litho
                      > board and celo tape, I think I will remain with simply lifting the
                      > lid off the Pyrex food storage bowl and access perfect ink without
                      > the additional efforts which would tax my advanced decrepitude.
                      >
                      > I have been using this method for six months or more, and the ink
                      > is as fresh and ready as the day I bought it. No skimming, no other
                      > tasks but to place it on the stone and give it some exercise. It
                      > does require replacing the lid on the can and the Pyrex cannister,
                      > but I can usually manage that.
                      >
                      > Norman L. McKnight
                      > Philoxenia Press
                      > Berkeley
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > • To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
                      > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                      > • Encountering problems? contact:
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                      >
                      >
                    • Norman L McKnight
                      Elias: I couldn t locate where you are, but Pyrex is a trade name for oven- proof glass cookware; they also make glass containers for storing foods in the
                      Message 10 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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                        Elias:

                        I couldn't locate where you are, but Pyrex is a trade name for oven-
                        proof glass cookware; they also make glass containers for storing
                        foods in the refrigerator. These are also ovenproof, but they have
                        a plastic, tightly sealed lid which keeps out the air and preserves
                        the food. These are not the cheap plastic containers which are also
                        available and not very secure. The glass containers are very tight
                        and I have never had a problem. I think being airtight they would
                        work for any ink subject to skinning. Air gets into the cans even
                        with tape and skin papers, but I have had no such problem with these
                        glass containers. I am only speaking from personal experience, and
                        the frustration of having lost much ink while getting rid of the
                        mess on top of the can when skinning occurs. I now open the container
                        to a creamy, smooth ink just as it came from the manufacturer.
                        These containers must be available in the UK, Europe and elsewhere,
                        perhaps under a different name. The key is to have a very tight fit
                        which keeps out the air.

                        Norman L. McKnight
                        Philoxenia Press
                        Berkeley
                      • paul white
                        Has anyone thought of vacuum pumps? I know there are vacuum machines for food storage. -Paul White ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        Message 11 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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                          Has anyone thought of vacuum pumps? I know there are vacuum machines
                          for food storage.
                          -Paul White


                          On Dec 4, 2003, at 8:06 PM, Norman L McKnight wrote:

                          > Elias:�
                          >
                          > I couldn't locate where you are, but Pyrex is a trade name for oven-
                          > proof glass cookware; they also make glass containers for storing
                          > foods in the refrigerator. These are also ovenproof, but they have
                          > a plastic, tightly sealed lid which keeps out the air and preserves
                          > the food. These are not the cheap plastic containers which are also
                          > available and not very secure. The glass containers are very tight
                          > and I have never had a problem. I think being airtight they would
                          > work for any ink subject to skinning. Air gets into the cans even
                          > with tape and skin papers, but I have had no such problem with these
                          > glass containers. I am only speaking from personal experience, and
                          > the frustration of having lost much ink while getting rid of the
                          > mess on top of the can when skinning occurs. I now open the container
                          > to a creamy, smooth ink just as it came from the manufacturer.
                          > These containers must be available in the UK, Europe and elsewhere,
                          > perhaps under a different name. The key is to have a very tight fit
                          > which keeps out the air.
                          >
                          > Norman L. McKnight
                          > Philoxenia Press
                          > Berkeley
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                          >
                          > ADVERTISEMENT
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                          >
                          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                          >

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Gerald Lange
                          Norman Actually, anything that will completely block oxygen will work. Even water. Photo folks use a nitrogen blanket to protect their various chemicals.
                          Message 12 of 14 , Dec 4, 2003
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                            Norman

                            Actually, anything that will completely block oxygen will work. Even water. Photo
                            folks use a "nitrogen blanket" to protect their various chemicals. Comes in a spray can. Heavier than air. Works well.

                            Gerald




                            fromI think being airtight they would
                            > work for any ink subject to skinning. Air gets into the cans even
                            > with tape and skin papers, but I have had no such problem with these
                            > glass containers....
                            > Norman L. McKnight
                            > Philoxenia Press
                            > Berkeley
                          • E Roustom
                            ... Somewhat on the fringe as far worries are concerned - but how light sensitive is the ink as a mass - is using a clear glass container a problem, especially
                            Message 13 of 14 , Dec 5, 2003
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                              > The glass containers are very tight
                              > and I have never had a problem.

                              Somewhat on the fringe as far worries are concerned - but how light
                              sensitive is the ink as a mass - is using a clear glass container a problem,
                              especially with Pantones? Anyone know, or want to guess?


                              Elias
                            • Norman L McKnight
                              Elias: I didn t mean to imply that I emptied the cans directly into a glass container; I simply place a skin paper on the clean surface of the ink in the can,
                              Message 14 of 14 , Dec 5, 2003
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                                Elias:

                                I didn't mean to imply that I emptied the cans directly into a
                                glass container; I simply place a skin paper on the clean surface
                                of the ink in the can, place the entire can into the glass container
                                and close its air-tight lid. Nothing more is needed, not even tape
                                around the lid of the can.

                                Norman
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