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  • ausart1938
    I will stick to using the linecasters for text and the ludlow and hand set for headings. I am using the polymer plates just for line blocks at the moment. I am
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 11, 2003
      I will stick to using the linecasters for text and the ludlow and
      hand set for headings. I am using the polymer plates just for line
      blocks at the moment. I am getting these made at a small place that
      does rubber stamps, they have all the good gear (hope to have a go at
      it later) The plates must be good for a lot of people that do not
      have access to linecasters and for faces that are not available any
      more. The man that does the blocks for us will not have a go at half
      tones, he says they do not work with polymer. Worked on our show
      programme today looks as though it will be 96 pages plus cover 500
      copies. It has been set on our 1928 Intertype, Ludlow and polymer
      blocks for the advertisements. A big job, but at least we had a lot
      standing this year, it will be printed 2 pages at a time on our
      Heidelberg Platen as we do not have our Miehle Vertical going yet.
      Arthur Johnson in Australia.
    • E Roustom
      ... I recently printed some duotones, reproductions of fine art photos, at 133 LPI, 8 images, 1000 of each (3.5 x 5). Some images very contrasty, these were
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 11, 2003
        >The man that does the blocks for us will not have a go at half
        > tones, he says they do not work with polymer.

        I recently printed some duotones, reproductions of fine art photos, at 133
        LPI, 8 images, 1000 of each (3.5 x 5). Some images very contrasty, these
        were the hardest to work with. Of course I used coated stock. While the
        learning experience was difficult costly (for me) and time consuming, the
        end result was wonderful. This was done with photopolymer, on a Windmill. It
        is possible. The problems I have yet to fully solve are the
        ink/paper/weather relationships (my space is not the most controlled
        environment). 120 and 110 LPI are easier to deal with - so if reproduction
        of photos is the main concern, then there is no shame in taking that easy
        way out.
        Mats Broberg (sp?) has posted here on BASF plates (nyloprint). I've
        experimented with these, and they are promising. Andersen Vreeland sells a
        softer plate that they reccommend for halftones (contact them for details)
        that I also tried, and these were almost too easy to work with. The soft(er)
        plates made it almost unecessary to cut makeready.
        Careful prepress, and experience working with images is essential. Not
        all images are letterpress friendly, unless the magic combination of ink and
        paper are known, and in hand. The industry regularly put out halftones of
        every kind in the past, and I'm sure there's a trick to it that I haven't
        found documented, or have not discovered. I'm almost sure it is the inks -
        the ink industry today is geared for offset only, and offset inks are just
        about one size fits all - not at all how letterpress worked.
        Printing halftones is where soft packing is useful - Heidelberg
        reccommends a rubber sheet ($$) in the packing.

        Elias
      • M a n i f e s t o P r e s s
        I have printed halftones with pretty decent success, including one that 4x9. Take a look at the muslimgauze cd in the portfolio section of my website. This
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 11, 2003
          I have printed halftones with pretty decent success, including one that 4x9.
          Take a look at the muslimgauze cd in the portfolio section of my website.
          This thing was made even more complicated by the fact that it was also
          printed on chipboard. Try holding a decent dot on paper with enough bumps to
          trip a fly.

          The rubber sheet in the back of the Windmill manual that Elias mentioned is
          the trick. When purchased as packing, it¹s quite expensive. When purchased
          from the local fetish or fabric store, it¹s very affordable. The material is
          nothing more than latex. It comes in many different thicknesses and
          finishes. It can be purchased as a matte finish or a polished. I bought a
          large supply of it from a woman I know who designs fetish/bondage clothes
          for a store in Cambridge ,MA. It works like a dream. You can lay down a nice
          impression using this stuff. Obviously it takes some experimenting to get
          used to it...but well worth the time and short expense.

          When I printed the muslimgauze halftone, I used a pound of very stiff dense
          black. I thinned it a wee-bit with compound and it printed beautifully. The
          chipboard was too thick for the latex to really do anything. I increased
          impression and spent a hell-of-a lot of time with make ready. The image
          stayed open, the dot was dense, and coverage was like butta¹. I was
          fortunate that the image was high contrast and rough... 120lpi.


          Cheers,
          Bryan





          bryan hutcheson

          manifesto letterpress
          116 pleasant st. #2245
          easthampton, ma 01027

          p/f: 413.529.0009
          http://www.manifestopress.com

          Custom Letterpress Printing & Design
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