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Re: [PPLetterpress] Building up roller tracks

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  • Fritz Klinke
    May I suggest that makeready is not merely placing paper under the base or another sheet under the tympan. Traditional makeready, as outlined in Platen Press
    Message 1 of 61 , Oct 10, 2003
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      May I suggest that makeready is not merely placing paper under the base or
      another sheet under the tympan. Traditional makeready, as outlined in Platen
      Press Operations and General Printing, requires the "spotting" of makeready
      tissue in the low areas of impression. Now, if the spots of insufficient inking
      are moving, as may be inferred from your description, then it traces immediately
      to the rollers, and then on from there. Even in the deep impression school of
      printing, the edges of plates will "bear off" more than the center of the plate,
      whether it be type or illustration, and this is true of platens and cylinders.
      So, the solution is to build up the center portions of type areas, and then you
      can back off a little on the overall impression, and that way the first letter
      or two on each end of a line evens out in the impression and thus in the
      printed/visual result as well.

      I see many samples pass through our office from all over and that's the most
      common problem. Ink rollers will likewise over ink the first part of a type form
      or plate that the roller comes in contact with, especially if the roller is set
      too low, and they also "bear off" to some extent--the outer areas of a form will
      look great, but the roller may barely touch the inner area, and thus inking
      problems. The harder the roller, the more the problem.

      Hard rollers seem to have wide acceptance among letterpress people because they
      cost a lot to have them recovered. We get Vandercook rollers in that measure in
      the 60 to 80 Shore D durometer range, whereas new they are made to the 18-22
      Shore D range. Offset rollers start at about 28 Shore D, and even that's too
      hard for good letterpress. I realize that most letterpress people don't have a
      durometer gauge in their desk drawer, but we do, and that is what I see on
      almost every one of the several thousand rollers we have recovered. If the tape
      routine doesn't work, the changing of trucks doesn't work, if someone's
      wonderful base system doesn't work, look at the single most important link in
      the chain--rollers.

      Fritz

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Carole Aldrich" <carolealdrich@...>
      To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>

      I kept using makeready sheets during these adjustments to keep
      from using my "good" paper. If I raised the plate with a tiny piece of thin
      paper, it
      would ink too much. If I took the paper away, too little. Ditto for adjustments
      to my
      tape on the roller tracks. Adding a piece was too much, without it, too little.
      Seems
      like there was constant fiddling throughout the print run.
    • E Roustom
      ... Stop! the vinegar will eat the polymer right up. That s what one is to use when cleaning platemaking equipment. It just melts the stuff. e.
      Message 61 of 61 , Oct 29, 2003
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        > hmmm...
        > may be i'll dunk a piece of polymer into vinegar to see if it does anything...
        > (will
        > report back).

        Stop! the vinegar will eat the polymer right up. That's what one is to use
        when cleaning platemaking equipment. It just melts the stuff.

        e.
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