Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Cutting thick plates?

Expand Messages
  • Nick
    I have been using the KM153 toyobo plate but I still have not found a good way to cut them before exposure. Post exposure they are fairly easy to cut with
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 18 9:56 AM
      I have been using the KM153 toyobo plate but I still have not
      found a good way to cut them before exposure. Post exposure
      they are fairly easy to cut with heavy duty scissors or metal
      shears. Are there any reccomendations out there?
      Thank You any help is greatly appreciated.
      -Nick
      nutsandboltsoakland@...
    • mike.jacobs
      Hi Over here we use a panel cutter sold by motor factors. This cuts from one side of a sheet of metal, as would be necessary if cutting a panel on a motor car.
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 18 10:21 AM
        Hi
        Over here we use a panel cutter sold by motor factors. This cuts from one side of a sheet of metal, as would be necessary if cutting a panel on a motor car. It is also designed not to distort the panel during the cut.
        Siggest a vist to your local motor ectras dealer.
        Mike
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Nick
        To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, September 18, 2003 5:56 PM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] Cutting thick plates?


        I have been using the KM153 toyobo plate but I still have not
        found a good way to cut them before exposure. Post exposure
        they are fairly easy to cut with heavy duty scissors or metal
        shears. Are there any reccomendations out there?
        Thank You any help is greatly appreciated.
        -Nick
        nutsandboltsoakland@...



        Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        ADVERTISEMENT




        . To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
        PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        . Encountering problems? contact:
        PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
        . To unsubscribe:
        PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • E Roustom
        How thick or hard (unexposed) could it be? My plates overall thickness is .057, the steel is .013 - I use the hardest stuff Jet makes. I ve been using just a
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 18 11:01 AM
          How thick or hard (unexposed) could it be? My plates overall thickness is
          .057, the steel is .013 - I use the hardest stuff Jet makes.
          I've been using just a regular old (pretty old actually) paper/board
          sheer - granted it is somewhat heavy duty, but it is not unlike what most of
          us would have had access to in high school art class PLE (Pre Lawsuits Era).
          It ruins roughly 1/16" on the blade (as opposed to table) side, by slightly
          bending it, but this is easily trimmed off.
          It requires a little muscle to keep blade tight against shearing edge,
          and perhaps a little speed - works just fine - even after exposure through
          hardened polymer, but most of the time I plan not to have to trim through
          exposed plate material.

          I hope that helps.

          Elias

          > From: "Nick" <nutsandboltsoakland@...>
          > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2003 16:56:21 -0000
          > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Cutting thick plates?
          >
          > I have been using the KM153 toyobo plate but I still have not
          > found a good way to cut them before exposure. Post exposure
          > they are fairly easy to cut with heavy duty scissors or metal
          > shears. Are there any reccomendations out there?
          > Thank You any help is greatly appreciated.
          > -Nick
          > nutsandboltsoakland@...
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > • To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
          > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          > • Encountering problems? contact:
          > PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
          > • To unsubscribe:
          > PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
        • M a n i f e s t o P r e s s
          Keep an eye on ebay for bench top metal shears. I just picked up a brand new Kepro cutter with a 12² cutting width for $280. It cuts my 145 plates without any
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 18 11:04 AM
            Keep an eye on ebay for bench top metal shears. I just picked up a brand new
            Kepro cutter with a 12² cutting width for $280. It cuts my 145 plates
            without any bending etc.

            I just did a quick search on ebay, and the one I have is listed. The price
            is cheap right now but I am sure it will undoubtedly increase at the very
            end of the auction. Before I purchased mine, I watched the prices of
            comparable shears over the course of a month. Their prices for 12² shears
            ranged from $150 for the low end to $800 Diacro (Used)

            http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2558774833&category=633


            Cheers,
            Bryan



            €‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹€
            bryan hutcheson
            manifesto letterpress
            116 pleasant st. #2245
            easthampton, ma 01027

            p/f: 413.529.0009
            http://www.manifestopress.com
            €‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹€



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Gerald Lange
            Nick A guillotine paper shears, such as a Kutrimmer, works well. This was recommended to me by my platemaker sales rep. It holds the plate while you shear.
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 19 9:30 PM
              Nick

              A guillotine paper shears, such as a Kutrimmer, works well. This was
              recommended to me by my platemaker sales rep. It holds the plate while you shear. Never have had any problem with it. Tad expensive, but you can shop around on the net to get the best price. It also works great for trimming booklets and chipboard. Gabriel Rummonds (Printing with the Iron Handpress) recommends it for cutting paper for an edition (over a standard paper cutter). I would think a heavy duty scissors or metal shears would bend the plate a bit too much. I discovered that you can prevent the bending that Alias mentioned, by shimming up the counter blade to the correct height with printers' spacing material!!!

              Gerald


              > I have been using the KM153 toyobo plate but I still have not
              > found a good way to cut them before exposure. Post exposure
              > they are fairly easy to cut with heavy duty scissors or metal
              > shears. Are there any reccomendations out there?
              > Thank You any help is greatly appreciated.
              > -Nick
              > nutsandboltsoakland@y...
            • E Roustom
              ... A cutter is either a guillotine or a shear... not both. A guillotine uses one (very sharp) blade, a shear uses two blades. A guillotine would be least
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 20 9:30 AM
                Nomenclature:
                > A guillotine paper shears
                A cutter is either a guillotine or a shear... not both.
                A guillotine uses one (very sharp) blade, a shear uses two blades.
                A guillotine would be least ideal for cutting plates.

                >I discovered that you can prevent the bending that [E]lias mentioned,
                >by shimming up the counter blade to the correct height with
                >printers' spacing material!!!
                The bending I get is on the waste (or moving blade) side, not on the table
                side. Do you shim the outside, if so how? If the table and fixed blade are
                not in perfect alignment, the plate will bend on both sides.


                E.
              • Gerald Lange
                Yeah, wrong word. Main point would be that a clamp to hold the plate (on a table shear) is important. At any rate, you can adjust the Kutrimmer so that you
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 20 10:07 AM
                  Yeah, wrong word. Main point would be that a clamp to hold the plate
                  (on a table shear) is important. At any rate, you can adjust the
                  Kutrimmer so that you will not get bending on the "waste" side. The
                  fixed blade, on a Kutrimmer, is adjustable, but requires shimming.
                  Every Kutrimmer I've seen comes from the factory with the counter
                  blade set a bit too low. I assume this is for cutting more pliable
                  materials. Since steel-plates aren't pliable, an adjustment to make
                  the counter blade even with the table surface, is necessary to prevent
                  bending. At any rate, it works.

                  Gerald



                  > Nomenclature:
                  > > A guillotine paper shears
                  > A cutter is either a guillotine or a shear... not both.
                  > A guillotine uses one (very sharp) blade, a shear uses two blades.
                  > A guillotine would be least ideal for cutting plates.
                  >
                  > >I discovered that you can prevent the bending that [E]lias mentioned,
                  > >by shimming up the counter blade to the correct height with
                  > >printers' spacing material!!!
                  > The bending I get is on the waste (or moving blade) side, not on the
                  table
                  > side. Do you shim the outside, if so how? If the table and fixed
                  blade are
                  > not in perfect alignment, the plate will bend on both sides.
                  >
                  >
                  > E.
                • E Roustom
                  Hi Gerald, ... In what direction do you make that adjustment? thanks, E.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 20 10:38 AM
                    Hi Gerald,

                    > At any rate, you can adjust the
                    > Kutrimmer so that you will not get bending on the "waste" side.

                    In what direction do you make that adjustment?

                    thanks,

                    E.
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.