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Re: UV light

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  • Gerald Lange
    I ve looked at this sight previously but never put a connection here because of a couple of things. As I recall, 1) the vacuum uses a sheet of glass, and 2)
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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      I've looked at this sight previously but never put a connection here
      because of a couple of things. As I recall, 1) the vacuum uses a sheet
      of glass, and 2) the book list looks like it is intended for alt photo
      processes (which I assume is what the site is all about).

      My understanding is that you do need a translucent medium not a
      transparent medium for photopolymer exposure. I had asked my
      platemaker sales rep about this a long while back and he confirmed it.
      I believe Harold Kyle (Boxcarpress.com) sells some kind of kit for
      replacing glass with Vreene though.

      Otherwise, a nice site. And some nice looking and portable exposure
      units. I would imagine that with a little prodding these folks would
      be happy to accomodate.

      Gerald


      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "raykingblue" <rayking@m...> wrote:
      > I am forward the message below because I too am interested in knowing
      > if these
      > boxes are suitable for Photopolymer Platemaking.
      >
      > From: Ed Inman <edinman@e...>
      > Date: Wed Sep 3, 2003 7:41:04 PM US/Pacific
      > To: LETPRESS@L...
      > Subject: New UV Light Sources
      > Reply-To: Ed Inman <edinman@e...>
      >
      > Does anyone know whether the UV light source boxes advertised on this
      > page:
      >
      > http://www.eepjon.com/uv.htm
      >
      > are suitable for exposing photopolymer plates? Also, do you think
      > $545 is a
      > good price for a new 11 x 14 model? I noticed Freestyle recently
      > started
      > selling these as a light source for Platinum/Palladium process
      > exposures.
      >
      > Ed
    • typetom@aol.com
      In a message dated 9/5/2003 bieler@worldnet.att.net writes:
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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        In a message dated 9/5/2003 bieler@... writes:
        << the vacuum uses a sheet of glass...
        My understanding is that you do need a translucent medium not a transparent
        medium for photopolymer exposure. I had asked my platemaker sales rep about
        this a long while back and he confirmed it.
        I believe Harold Kyle (Boxcarpress.com) sells some kind of kit for replacing
        glass with (K)reene though. >>

        Hi Gerald,
        I have been using transparent glass (an old Nuarc vacuum frame) for exposing
        photopolymer plates -- no problem except the vacuum actually was bending the
        glass slightly and allowing occasionally irregular contact between the negative
        and the plate material. I solved that by adding pieces of mat board around
        the plate material to support the glass and keep it from bending so much.

        The use of glass (and the transparency) does not seem to me to be a problem,
        once I figured out the bending. I work with an home-made exposure set-up and
        hand washout, and I have been getting excellent and consistent results, all
        kinds of fine-lined images and fonts.

        My exposure box is 4 UV flourescent bulbs, which cost me a total of $48. A
        friend gave me the vacuum frame, so that was my total start up cost except the
        price of a brush I got from Gene Becker.

        The only advantage I can see for the expensive exposure/washout machines is
        for doing quite large plates, which may take too long to wash out by hand with
        a manageable size brush. I've done 7 x 9 and a few larger, though, on
        occasion, mostly around 4 x 6 no problems.
        Best wishes to all, Tom


        Tom Parson
        Now It's Up To You Publications
        157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
        (303) 777-8951
        http://members.aol.com/typetom
      • E Roustom
        ... The enthusiasm and ingenuity is aplauded, but the understatement calls for a correction: The advatantage of the expensive exposure/washout machines is
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 6, 2003
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          > The only advantage I can see for the expensive exposure/washout machines is
          > for doing quite large plates, which may take too long to wash out by hand with
          > a manageable size brush. I've done 7 x 9 and a few larger, though, on
          > occasion, mostly around 4 x 6 no problems.
          > Best wishes to all, Tom

          The enthusiasm and ingenuity is aplauded, but the understatement calls for a
          correction: The advatantage of "the expensive exposure/washout machines" is
          being able to make plate after plate in a predictable and reliable manner
          with the least amount of effort in the least amount of time, wasting less
          material in the process. If you print for profit (ha ha) there's no
          substitute.

          If you print occasionally though, the big machines are overkill.

          Elias
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