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NPR interview of Matthew Carter

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  • Gerald Lange
    An archived NPR interview of type designer Matthew Carter is available at http://www.theconnection.org/shows/2003/09/20030904_b_main.asp You need RealPlayer to
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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      An archived NPR interview of type designer Matthew Carter is available at

      http://www.theconnection.org/shows/2003/09/20030904_b_main.asp

      You need RealPlayer to listen to this.

      Gerald
    • M a n i f e s t o P r e s s
      I called in to this show right after it started. I told the screener I was a letterpress printer who has worked with lead type as a caster, wood type, and now
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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        I called in to this show right after it started. I told the screener I was a
        letterpress printer who has worked with lead type as a caster, wood type,
        and now primarily with photo-polymer as a letterpress printer. I also
        mentioned that I was finishing up label designs for a brewery that used a
        special typeface a close friend of mine designed specifically for the
        brewery...she put me on hold and then about 5 minutes later came back to
        tell me she didnĀ¹t think my topic was relevant to the conversation...


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Peter Fraterdeus
        ... Unfortunately, broadcast media folks are pretty clueless about design, in general... I m sure they had no idea what Matthew was talking about. P ... --
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 5, 2003
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          >...she put me on hold and then about 5 minutes later came back to
          >tell me she didn't think my topic was relevant to the conversation...

          Unfortunately, broadcast media folks are pretty clueless about design, in general... I'm sure they had no idea what Matthew was talking about.

          P


          >I called in to this show right after it started. I told the screener I was a
          >letterpress printer who has worked with lead type as a caster, wood type,
          >and now primarily with photo-polymer as a letterpress printer. I also
          >mentioned that I was finishing up label designs for a brewery that used a
          >special typeface a close friend of mine designed specifically for the
          >brewery...she put me on hold and then about 5 minutes later came back to
          >tell me she didn't think my topic was relevant to the conversation...

          --
          AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@

          Peter Fraterdeus http://www.midsummernightstamps.com
          http://www.fraterdeus.com |* + * + * + Rubber Stamp Fine Art!

          http://www.semiotx.com Web Strategy Consulting < * > Mac OS X
          "Words that work."(tm) Communication Design and Typography
        • Paul W Romaine
          A friend (not a designer or printer, but a book collector) who heard ... ability to make what he does really understandable to an average person. ... metal,
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 6, 2003
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            A friend (not a designer or printer, but a book collector) who heard
            the interview wrote me about it:

            >Matthew was very interesting. He has the remarkable
            ability to make what he does really understandable to an average
            person.

            >Interesting points he made--

            >1. He always begins designing a type with the letters h and o.

            > 2. He came out squarely in favor of new technology vs. hot and cold
            metal, etc. (Several callers, one of them a former worker at
            Morganthaler, opined that everything had [gone] downhill since ca.
            1910...)

            > 3. Made the distinction between what he produces and what people do
            with it.

            > 4. Mentioned his parents coming out of an "arts and crafts
            tradition" influenced by Ruskin and Morris.
            <

            The NPR website wasn't allowing the Real Audio data to stream when I
            check, but the interview sounds interesting.

            -Paul
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