Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

very interesting

Expand Messages
  • henrietta
    While a newbie to letterpress and never having seen a steel or vinyl plate in my life, I have found the discussion fascinating as to how passionately yet
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 10, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      While a newbie to letterpress and never having seen a steel or vinyl
      plate in my life, I have found the discussion fascinating as to how
      passionately yet fairly proponents of different systems have
      explained their preferences - thank you for an enlightening series.
      --
      Henrietta in Blue Hill, Maine
    • Fritz Klinke
      I have followed this thread with interest as we are a supplier of raw plates, finished plates and bases. We also use what we sell, so as a test for my own
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 11, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        I have followed this thread with interest as we are a supplier of raw
        plates, finished plates and bases. We also use what we sell, so as a test
        for my own benefit, I ran a 2-up business card last night with a Jet
        LSL-145SB plate on a Bunting base where I moved the base 6 times to end up
        with a 12-up 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of business cards. The original file was
        created by Elias Roustom and had both type and an oval halftone. I printed
        it on 80# Kromekote cover, and to mildly put it, used about a 75% "Elias"
        impression, which means way too much for traditional letterpress, but worked
        fine on the coated stock. I have several blocks of aluminum milled to
        precisely 2x3 1/2, so I can move the base around the chase and have absolute
        alignment when doing multiple-up runs of business cards. I was looking for
        plate creep in the 3000 impressions I ran and detected none. This was
        printed on a Miehle Vertical V-50. I would never consider such a run or job
        on a Vandercook of any persuasion, and I have 4 in our shop that I could
        potentially use. And normally, I would have run this 2-up on the windmill.

        I freely acknowledge that our el cheapo wood bases, and the Patmags will
        evidence plate creep, but that's easily overcome. I had only a minor
        adjustment after I mounted the plate as it was slightly out of square. I
        marked up the base with pencil lines where I wanted the plate, made sure the
        leading edge of the plate was trimmed reasonably parallel with the first
        line of type, and was printing fairly soon--my only problem was backing off
        on the roller adjustment so that the base didn't get inked. Metal type is so
        much more forgiving on the inking side than the photopolymer approach. My
        next job in a couple of days is all Linotype with a few hand set lines.

        One amazing thing about this run was that when I pulled my first impression,
        I had completely forgotten that my last job was for scoring and that I had
        left the scoring matrix attached to the cylinder tympan. Of course, I ran
        that matrix right through both halftones which is akin to leaving a bale on
        top of the tympan on a hand fed press. But, I could not detect any visual
        damage to the plate and ended up adding about .004 in makeready to each
        halftone that eliminated the slight shadow left by the matrix in the face of
        the plate. I was very impressed with the ability of the plate to sustain
        damage that would have smashed metal type and left a distinct furrow in a
        zinc or magnesium plate. All said and done, I still prefer metal type. I
        could have made a new plate in 20 minutes, but I wanted to see if I could
        salvage that plate, and it worked fine. I printed a halftone last week using
        a BASF plate that was the easiest and nicest halftone I've ever run--no
        makeready, lined up perfectly the first time on the Bunting base and I was
        running perfectly acceptable work within 15 minutes of locking up the form.

        Fritz

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "henrietta" <quilter@...>
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, August 10, 2003 9:30 PM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] very interesting


        While a newbie to letterpress and never having seen a steel or vinyl
        plate in my life, I have found the discussion fascinating as to how
        passionately yet fairly proponents of different systems have
        explained their preferences - thank you for an enlightening series.
        --
        Henrietta in Blue Hill, Maine


        . To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
        PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        . Encountering problems? contact:
        PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
        . To unsubscribe:
        PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Chip Schilling
        I just thought I would add, that one of the advantages of both Bunting and Boxcar bases is that you can gang smaller bases together for larger plates without
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 12, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          I just thought I would add, that one of the advantages of both Bunting and
          Boxcar bases is that you can gang smaller bases together for larger plates
          without any problem (if your press bed is clean) of ghosting when you run
          solids (or type for that matter).

          This is a problem with bases that have sheet magnet material attached to
          them because that sheet material is soft and tends to compress a little on
          impression (no matter what your depth of impression preference is) and this
          causes a faded line on solids where the two bases are butted up to one
          another.

          Chip
          --

          Chip Schilling - Indulgence Press
          1332 Marshall St. NE
          Minneapolis, MN 55413
          Phone (612) 379-4743
          Fax (612) 331-8114
          www.indulgencepress.com




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.