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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: NEW THREAD

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  • Kathleen Whalen
    If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you d be a calligrapher. That s the why of the invention of the process surely! Graham Moss Incline Press 36
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 21, 2003
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      If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you'd be a calligrapher.
      That's the why of the invention of the process surely!
      Graham Moss
      Incline Press
      36 Bow Street
      Oldham OL1 1SJ England
      (44) 0161 627 1966
      http://www.inclinepress.com
    • Gerald Lange
      ... calligrapher. ... Not necessarily the why. There was, I believe, considerable incentive. Nicolas of Cues, a contemporary papal authority, was an advocate
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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        > If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you'd be a
        calligrapher.
        > That's the why of the invention of the process surely!
        > Graham Moss

        Not necessarily the why. There was, I believe, considerable incentive.
        Nicolas of Cues, a contemporary papal authority, was an advocate
        (pre-printing) for a mechanical method to replace the problem of
        corruption of text that was inherent in the copying process. Most of
        the copies of B42 were sold to the Church, and from what I understand,
        presold. The connection is thought to be Cues. Bit of an interesting
        creation of the idea of credit. Quite an amazing production in many,
        many ways.

        Gerald
      • Mark Wilden
        From Graham Moss ... From: Gerald Lange ... A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On the other
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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          From Graham Moss
          >> If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you'd be a
          >>calligrapher. That's the why of the invention of the process surely!


          From: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>

          >Not necessarily the why. There was, I believe, considerable incentive.
          >Nicolas of Cues, a contemporary papal authority, was an advocate
          >pre-printing) for a mechanical method to replace the problem of
          >corruption of text that was inherent in the copying process.

          A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On the
          other hand, Fust in Paris, before he died of the plague, was accused of
          counterfeiting manuscripts.

          > Most of the copies of B42 were sold to the Church

          This is a very important point, to contradict those who ascribe printing's
          success solely to the Reformation.

          > Bit of an interesting creation of the idea of credit. Quite an amazing
          production in many,
          > many ways.

          You can say that again!
        • Gerald Lange
          Mark ... Thought he was on a selling trip. How do you counterfeit a manuscript? Think counterfeiting was something that came along with printing. Reproduction
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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            Mark

            > A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On the
            > other hand, Fust in Paris, before he died of the plague, was accused of
            > counterfeiting manuscripts.

            Thought he was on a selling trip. How do you counterfeit a manuscript?
            Think counterfeiting was something that came along with printing.
            Reproduction and all.

            >>Most of the copies of B42 were sold to the Church
            >
            > This is a very important point, to contradict those who ascribe printing's
            > success solely to the Reformation.
            >
            Think its success was more due to the fact that it escaped the Mainz
            authority "by which means it took further wing."

            Lot of roads to follow, bud.

            Thanks.

            Gerald
          • Mark Wilden
            From: Gerald Lange ... the ... By purporting to sell something which it was not. To wit, a manuscript that was in fact mechanically
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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              From: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>

              >> A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On
              the
              >> other hand, Fust in Paris, before he died of the plague, was accused of
              >> counterfeiting manuscripts.

              > Thought he was on a selling trip. How do you counterfeit a manuscript?

              By purporting to sell something which it was not. To wit, a manuscript that
              was in fact mechanically rather than manually reproduced. Least, that's what
              I've read in the books...

              >Think counterfeiting was something that came along with printing.
              > Reproduction and all.

              Manuscript (as with other biological cum mechanical processes) is a form of
              reproduction, IMO <gd&r!>

              >>>Most of the copies of B42 were sold to the Church
              >
              >>This is a very important point, to contradict those who ascribe printing's
              >>success solely to the Reformation.
              >
              >Think its success was more due to the fact that it escaped the Mainz
              >authority "by which means it took further wing."

              Very interesting point!

              >Lot of roads to follow, bud.

              Agreed. That's why we're init.

              Thanks, Gerald.
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