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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: NEW THREAD

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  • InkPotJim@aol.com
    Up for discussion, and possibly slightly off topic: I ve referred several times with fellow designers to what I call the fetish of the edition . I m
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 17, 2003
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      Up for discussion, and possibly slightly off topic:

      I've referred several times with fellow designers to what I call "the fetish
      of the edition". I'm afflicted. Most of us are around here.

      Many of us enjoy letterpress printing as a more direct and satisfying means
      to create our art than commercial methods, the zen-like mindset of the
      letterpress printer as a soothing respite from the world, and the permanence of a
      print in a world of transient and non-indelible images.

      But what about MULTIPLICITY intrigues us so much? Why make 10 or 20 prints
      when 1 or 2 might be all we need?

      Beyond the obvious "some for my family" and "if I get famous", what's really
      at the heart of this basic desire to reproduce?

      Fire away!

      Jim Harrison
      DECA Design
      Gainesville, FL


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • E Roustom
      Nothing like a whole lot of prints lined up on a table, all the same, one after the other! Having one of something others have is communion - we re pack
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 17, 2003
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        Nothing like a whole lot of prints lined up on a table, all the same, one
        after the other! Having one of something others have is communion - we're
        pack animals, even in the most esoteric of persuits, we can't escape our
        nature.
        It's also what separates printmakers from painters... while a painter
        makes multiple strokes in rythym to make one painting, a printer only has
        the chance with multiple press cycles for his or her rythym, so the same
        emotional need is quelled differently - and naturally the result is
        multiples.

        Just like psycho-babel, it can't be helped.

        e.

        > From: InkPotJim@...
        > Reply-To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2003 16:50:48 EDT
        > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: NEW THREAD
        >
        > Up for discussion, and possibly slightly off topic:
        >
        > I've referred several times with fellow designers to what I call "the fetish
        > of the edition". I'm afflicted. Most of us are around here.
        >
        > Many of us enjoy letterpress printing as a more direct and satisfying means
        > to create our art than commercial methods, the zen-like mindset of the
        > letterpress printer as a soothing respite from the world, and the permanence
        > of a
        > print in a world of transient and non-indelible images.
        >
        > But what about MULTIPLICITY intrigues us so much? Why make 10 or 20 prints
        > when 1 or 2 might be all we need?
        >
        > Beyond the obvious "some for my family" and "if I get famous", what's really
        > at the heart of this basic desire to reproduce?
        >
        > Fire away!
        >
        > Jim Harrison
        > DECA Design
        > Gainesville, FL
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > ? To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
        > PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        > ? Encountering problems? contact:
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        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
      • cmcgarr1957
        good point, I think if the cd cover is printed this way all ganged up then you need to spec Pantone Process inks for each plate. This magazine was done using
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 17, 2003
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          good point, I think if the cd cover is printed this way all ganged up then you need to
          spec Pantone Process inks for each plate.

          This magazine was done using dozens of wood cut prints and fonts, they were
          printed letterpress in black, scaned in and colored in Quark.

          http://www.mcgarrcreative.com/print_rghne.html

          casey

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, InkPotJim@a... wrote:
          > Up for discussion, and possibly slightly off topic:
          >
          > I've referred several times with fellow designers to what I call "the fetish
          > of the edition". I'm afflicted. Most of us are around here.
          >
          > Many of us enjoy letterpress printing as a more direct and satisfying means
          > to create our art than commercial methods, the zen-like mindset of the
          > letterpress printer as a soothing respite from the world, and the permanence of a
          > print in a world of transient and non-indelible images.
          >
          > But what about MULTIPLICITY intrigues us so much? Why make 10 or 20 prints
          > when 1 or 2 might be all we need?
          >
          > Beyond the obvious "some for my family" and "if I get famous", what's really
          > at the heart of this basic desire to reproduce?
          >
          > Fire away!
          >
          > Jim Harrison
          > DECA Design
          > Gainesville, FL
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Gerald Lange
          ... satisfying means ... Jim That may have been part of the aura of letterpress printing right from the get go. This is my favorite passage from Moxon s
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 17, 2003
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            > Many of us enjoy letterpress printing as a more direct and
            satisfying means
            > to create our art than commercial methods, the zen-like mindset of the
            > letterpress printer as a soothing respite from the world...
            >
            > Jim Harrison
            > DECA Design
            > Gainesville, FL


            Jim

            That may have been part of the aura of letterpress printing right from
            the get go. This is my favorite passage from Moxon's Mechanick
            Exercises on the Whole Art of Printing, 1683-4 (his description of the
            somatic anaphora of presswork):

            He keeps a constant and methodical posture and gesture in every action
            of Pulling and Beating, which in a train of Work becomes habitual to
            him, and eases his Body, by not running into unnecessary diversions of
            Postures or Gestures in his Labour, and it eases his mind from much of
            its care, for the same causes have constantly the same effects. And a
            Pull of the same strength upon the same Form, with the same Beating,
            and with the same Blankets, &c. will give the same Colour and impression.

            Gerald
          • CaveworksPress@aol.com
            Aside from the physical action of printing being enjoyable (Vandy here), I just like the idea of being able to share my passions with more people. The
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 17, 2003
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              Aside from the physical action of printing being enjoyable (Vandy
              here), I just like the idea of being able to share my passions with more people.
              The dissemination of ideas fuels artistic endeavors, and shines bright lights
              in otherwise dull corners. The availability of a book or print is part of it's
              power. How many times have I been supremely grateful to have in my hands
              something that enriches me? Today, for example, I had Roy Behrens's Ballast
              Quarterly Review, a small zine started before zines were hot, on design,
              architecture, philosophy, books, and pretty much anything Roy puts his mind to.
              I'd much rather be disseminated than closeted away by one viewer, even
              if it's an exalted location in a museum.
              Former painter, (which isn't to say I won't paint again)!
              Julie

              CAVEWORKS PRESS
              Artist's Books, Poetry, and Broadsides
              http://www.caveworkspress.com


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kathleen Whalen
              If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you d be a calligrapher. That s the why of the invention of the process surely! Graham Moss Incline Press 36
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 21, 2003
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                If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you'd be a calligrapher.
                That's the why of the invention of the process surely!
                Graham Moss
                Incline Press
                36 Bow Street
                Oldham OL1 1SJ England
                (44) 0161 627 1966
                http://www.inclinepress.com
              • Gerald Lange
                ... calligrapher. ... Not necessarily the why. There was, I believe, considerable incentive. Nicolas of Cues, a contemporary papal authority, was an advocate
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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                  > If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you'd be a
                  calligrapher.
                  > That's the why of the invention of the process surely!
                  > Graham Moss

                  Not necessarily the why. There was, I believe, considerable incentive.
                  Nicolas of Cues, a contemporary papal authority, was an advocate
                  (pre-printing) for a mechanical method to replace the problem of
                  corruption of text that was inherent in the copying process. Most of
                  the copies of B42 were sold to the Church, and from what I understand,
                  presold. The connection is thought to be Cues. Bit of an interesting
                  creation of the idea of credit. Quite an amazing production in many,
                  many ways.

                  Gerald
                • Mark Wilden
                  From Graham Moss ... From: Gerald Lange ... A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On the other
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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                    From Graham Moss
                    >> If you are not a printer making multiple copies, you'd be a
                    >>calligrapher. That's the why of the invention of the process surely!


                    From: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>

                    >Not necessarily the why. There was, I believe, considerable incentive.
                    >Nicolas of Cues, a contemporary papal authority, was an advocate
                    >pre-printing) for a mechanical method to replace the problem of
                    >corruption of text that was inherent in the copying process.

                    A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On the
                    other hand, Fust in Paris, before he died of the plague, was accused of
                    counterfeiting manuscripts.

                    > Most of the copies of B42 were sold to the Church

                    This is a very important point, to contradict those who ascribe printing's
                    success solely to the Reformation.

                    > Bit of an interesting creation of the idea of credit. Quite an amazing
                    production in many,
                    > many ways.

                    You can say that again!
                  • Gerald Lange
                    Mark ... Thought he was on a selling trip. How do you counterfeit a manuscript? Think counterfeiting was something that came along with printing. Reproduction
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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                      Mark

                      > A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On the
                      > other hand, Fust in Paris, before he died of the plague, was accused of
                      > counterfeiting manuscripts.

                      Thought he was on a selling trip. How do you counterfeit a manuscript?
                      Think counterfeiting was something that came along with printing.
                      Reproduction and all.

                      >>Most of the copies of B42 were sold to the Church
                      >
                      > This is a very important point, to contradict those who ascribe printing's
                      > success solely to the Reformation.
                      >
                      Think its success was more due to the fact that it escaped the Mainz
                      authority "by which means it took further wing."

                      Lot of roads to follow, bud.

                      Thanks.

                      Gerald
                    • Mark Wilden
                      From: Gerald Lange ... the ... By purporting to sell something which it was not. To wit, a manuscript that was in fact mechanically
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 25, 2003
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                        From: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>

                        >> A most rational, innovative and (to me) heretofore unknown rationale! On
                        the
                        >> other hand, Fust in Paris, before he died of the plague, was accused of
                        >> counterfeiting manuscripts.

                        > Thought he was on a selling trip. How do you counterfeit a manuscript?

                        By purporting to sell something which it was not. To wit, a manuscript that
                        was in fact mechanically rather than manually reproduced. Least, that's what
                        I've read in the books...

                        >Think counterfeiting was something that came along with printing.
                        > Reproduction and all.

                        Manuscript (as with other biological cum mechanical processes) is a form of
                        reproduction, IMO <gd&r!>

                        >>>Most of the copies of B42 were sold to the Church
                        >
                        >>This is a very important point, to contradict those who ascribe printing's
                        >>success solely to the Reformation.
                        >
                        >Think its success was more due to the fact that it escaped the Mainz
                        >authority "by which means it took further wing."

                        Very interesting point!

                        >Lot of roads to follow, bud.

                        Agreed. That's why we're init.

                        Thanks, Gerald.
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