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Halting exposure

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  • Gerald Lange
    PPL This is partially in response to Milton s inquiry. If you need to expose one element of the negative longer than another, you can mask off the element that
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 10, 2001
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      PPL

      This is partially in response to Milton's inquiry.

      If you need to expose one element of the negative longer than another,
      you can mask off the element that needs less exposure with an opaque
      material such as Rubylith. With the vacuum on and the negative-to-
      plate contact secure, register and tape the mask to the vacuum sheet.
      After you have exposed the element that requires the longest exposure,
      remove the mask and re-expose the plate (you can determine the initial
      exposure rate by subtracting the rate of exposure of the shortest
      exposure requirement from that of the longest.)

      It might seem to make more sense to do this the other way around
      (which is what I initially suggested to Milton). But it is a bit
      easier on the nerves to mask this all out before you begin exposing,
      than to try and mask at midpoint.

      Gerald
    • Gerald Lange
      Dear Mark Stay with the goldenrod. Strips of film negative will work as well. Gerald
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 11, 2001
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        Dear Mark

        Stay with the goldenrod. Strips of film negative will work as well.

        Gerald


        Mark Attwood wrote:
        >
        > Gerald,
        >
        > I have found that UV light seems to partially go through rubylith and give
        > semi-exposed areas on the polymer, whereas if I use goldenrod paper it
        > doesn't do it. Am I using the wrong rubylith?
        >
        > Mark.
      • Mark Attwood
        Gerald, I have found that UV light seems to partially go through rubylith and give semi-exposed areas on the polymer, whereas if I use goldenrod paper it
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 11, 2001
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          Gerald,

          I have found that UV light seems to partially go through rubylith and give
          semi-exposed areas on the polymer, whereas if I use goldenrod paper it
          doesn't do it. Am I using the wrong rubylith?

          Mark.



          Mark Attwood
          mark@...


          ----------
          >From: "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...>
          >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [PPLetterpress] Halting exposure
          >Date: Thu, Oct 11, 2001, 5:29 am
          >

          > PPL
          >
          > This is partially in response to Milton's inquiry.
          >
          > If you need to expose one element of the negative longer than another,
          > you can mask off the element that needs less exposure with an opaque
          > material such as Rubylith. With the vacuum on and the negative-to-
          > plate contact secure, register and tape the mask to the vacuum sheet.
          > After you have exposed the element that requires the longest exposure,
          > remove the mask and re-expose the plate (you can determine the initial
          > exposure rate by subtracting the rate of exposure of the shortest
          > exposure requirement from that of the longest.)
          >
          > It might seem to make more sense to do this the other way around
          > (which is what I initially suggested to Milton). But it is a bit
          > easier on the nerves to mask this all out before you begin exposing,
          > than to try and mask at midpoint.
          >
          > Gerald
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
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