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Re: [PPLetterpress] light source question

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  • L.A. Book Arts, Inc
    The heater you can find all over the place, Wallgreens, home depot etc. they are standard home heaters. Before I bought a 24 x30 Vreeland Unit, I used a home
    Message 1 of 42 , Jun 22 4:43 PM
      The heater you can find all over the place, Wallgreens, home depot etc.
      they are standard home heaters.
      Before I bought a 24 x30 Vreeland Unit, I used a home made 16 x 20
      unit to make letterpress plates.
      Than for a print job in intaglio (Aquatint) there I orininally thought
      of using copper, but for time issues, the artist couldn;t get his stuff
      together and we have scheduled exhibitons. i decided to go polymer.
      For the size of plate I decided to get a professional platemaker as
      getting the moisture out from the plate is the key issue next to
      precise exposure.

      ch
      On Sunday, June 22, 2003, at 04:34 PM, Jan Ziegler wrote:

      > Charles,
      > Very good. I think we might have nailed one issue. Not
      > enough heat or time pre post-exposure. I will
      > definately try a new heater. I have read about and
      > seen many people use the hairdryer method but mostly
      > with plates that have lots of ink coverage like a
      > halftone photograph. Many of my images have more
      > "white" around them where the plate is wiped clean.
      > Can you elaborate a little on what a small ceramic
      > heater is? Is it marketed for home use (like at Target
      > or Home Depot) or is it something that would be
      > marketed as an industrial dryer? --Jan
      >
      >
      > --- "L.A. Book Arts, Inc" <livres@...> wrote:
      >> Jan, the press is never the problem.
      >>
      >>
      >> On Sunday, June 22, 2003, at 03:53 PM, Jan Ziegler
      >> wrote:
      >>
      >>> On sticky PP plates:
      >>> Thanks Charles, for your help.
      >>>
      >>> I have a Takach, so the press was not the problem.
      >> And
      >>> if you drop the whole thing in a water bath that
      >> only
      >>> solves that one print's problem, it doesn't make
      >> for
      >>> convenient editioning. (rather a funny picture of
      >> a
      >>> most frustrated printmaker). Plus, if you get the
      >>> plate wet often enough it will begin to soften and
      >>> disintegrate.
      >>
      >> He only wanted 5 prints anyway.
      >>
      >>
      >>> Perhaps Charbonnel inks are oilier or a
      >>> different kind of oil than Graphic Chemical. I use
      >> GC
      >>> inks, mostly, some Daniel Smith.
      >>>
      >>
      >> Less oilier than any other ink I've seen. I'm a
      >> french trained
      >> printmaker, so there, my attachment to charbonel
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>> At any rate, it begins to look like its a problem
      >> with
      >>> polymer that perhaps cannot be solved for etching
      >>> plates, unless most of the surface area that comes
      >> in
      >>> contact with the paper is inky. Cleanly wiped
      >> areas
      >>> are where the paper was sticking for me.
      >>>
      >>> I always dried for at least 10 minutes in a little
      >>> oven made from a hair dryer and a cardboard box
      >> turned
      >>> on its side(high tech) before post exposure.
      >>>
      >>
      >> I don't think 10 minutes is good enough and I don't
      >> think a hairdryer
      >> gets hot enough.
      >> I would consider getting one of this small electric
      >> ceramic heaters and
      >> use that for a heat box.
      >> I have a 24 x 30 plate right now in the machine,
      >> it's a BASF 94 and it
      >> will have to dry for 20 minutes at 120 f.
      >>
      >> I have tested a wide range of polymer plates,
      >> otherwise I work on
      >> copper- and if the paper sticks to wiped areas start
      >> playing with the
      >> ink first and modify it. Not neccessarly by dropping
      >> oil in it but
      >> mixing it with a different ink, same black but
      >> softer values.
      >> I've a roller grinder and mixer and I sometimes make
      >> 20 lbs of a custom
      >> ink for a job.
      >> But I use very, very little oil overall.
      >> ch
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>> Jan Ziegler
      >>> Santa Barbara
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> --- "L.A. Book Arts, Inc" <livres@...>
      >> wrote:
      >>>> I had an Artist here for whom I made plates, he
      >>>> brought his own ink
      >>>> -Graphical-Chemical ink - and the paper (BFK)
      >>>> sticked to the plate, I
      >>>> just dropped the whole thing in a water tray and
      >> the
      >>>> paper comes off
      >>>> without damage. He claimed the problem was with
      >> my
      >>>> press ( a Karl
      >>>> Krause 32x 60 inch, from ~1890) as the pressure
      >> is
      >>>> higher than is usual
      >>>> equipment (Takach and Brandt).
      >>>> I wiped ones off his plates with my standard ink
      >> -i
      >>>> use Charbonnel only
      >>>> - and pulled a plate with deep values , a
      >> perfect
      >>>> aquatint and the
      >>>> paper lifts without a problem.
      >>>>
      >>>> The most important thing than using polymer
      >> plate
      >>>> for intaglio is to
      >>>> get all the moisture out off the plate before
      >> post
      >>>> exposure. Otherwise
      >>>> you have shallow etched lines and areas, which
      >> show
      >>>> as flat spots on
      >>>> the plate and print whiter.
      >>>>
      >>>> Smaller plates you may be able to make in the
      >> sun,
      >>>> but I recommend to
      >>>> use a commercial Polymer plate maker for larger
      >>>> plates, as the
      >>>> exposure, drying and post exposer time is
      >> critical.
      >>>> Opposite to letterpress plates, in intaglio you
      >> have
      >>>> the majority of
      >>>> polymer plate material on the plate.
      >>>>
      >>>> charles
      >>>>
      >>>> ------------------------------------
      >>>> L.A Book Arts, Inc.
      >>>> The Custom Bindery
      >>>> Krause Intaglio
      >>>> 310.360.7265
      >>>> www.Custombindery.com
      >>>> ------------------------------------
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>
      >>>
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      >> <image.tiff>
      >>>
      >>>
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    • Mats Broberg
      ... Jan, Apologies for my belated reply to this question: Yes, I think it s called Kreene foil and is a vital part of the system, not only when exposing the
      Message 42 of 42 , Jun 26 10:33 AM
        > In answer to Matt's thought about using mat foil: I
        > use Kreene foil (is that mat?) and no glass right now.

        Jan,

        Apologies for my belated reply to this question: Yes, I think it's
        called Kreene foil and is a vital part of the system, not only when
        exposing the plates using a traditional setup with UV tubes but even
        more so when using a UV point light source, like Theimers, NuArcs, Olecs
        and the like. Harold Kyle @ Boxcar Press (on the list) sells it,
        together with alot of other fine printing pressroom supplies, should you
        run out of it.

        Regarding halftones I agree with Katie's recent post. Extremely high
        quality fine halftone work can be carried out using a letterpress
        printing press but since the eclipse of specialty makeready systems,
        like Permaton and chalk overlays, you probably wouldn't want to do it
        anyway. If you aim for halftones a better investment would be an
        entry-level offset press, like some of AB Dick's earlier models, which
        can be bought for very modest prices.

        Regarding the Windmill, you shouldn't be afraid, but merely keep a
        healthy respect for it, and any other motorized presses. Even with all
        the guards working fine, a platen press can hurt you very badly, and is
        perhaps more dangerous than a cylinder press. Should you aim for a
        Windmill - which indeed is a remarkable press of which I own two - never
        work by it when you are out of shouting distance to someone until you
        are very, very experienced.

        All the best,
        Mats Broberg

        Stockholm, Sweden
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