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Re: [PPLetterpress] Letter ink traps in photopolymer

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  • Manifesto Press
    I am chiming in with a question. I apologize if this has already been covered. By ³ink squeeze² are you referring to the ink build up that happens because
    Message 1 of 42 , Jun 17, 2003
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      I am chiming in with a question. I apologize if this has already been
      covered. By ³ink squeeze² are you referring to the ink build up that happens
      because rollers are riding to low on the form? I found that I got ink
      buildup that ³squeezed² under impression, only when my rollers were too low.
      I have recently tried a few tricks to completely eliminate this problem. I
      can both maintain a print quality as sharp as offset, while offering a deep
      impression (no debate, please) similar to the quality of a cylinder....on a
      10x15 C&P. The same tricks work well on the windmill too.


      Cheers,
      Bryan



      €‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹€
      bryan hutcheson
      manifesto letterpress
      116 pleasant st. #2245
      easthampton, ma 01027

      p/f: 413.529.0009
      http://www.manifestopress.com
      €‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹‹€



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mats Broberg
      ... Jan, Apologies for my belated reply to this question: Yes, I think it s called Kreene foil and is a vital part of the system, not only when exposing the
      Message 42 of 42 , Jun 26, 2003
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        > In answer to Matt's thought about using mat foil: I
        > use Kreene foil (is that mat?) and no glass right now.

        Jan,

        Apologies for my belated reply to this question: Yes, I think it's
        called Kreene foil and is a vital part of the system, not only when
        exposing the plates using a traditional setup with UV tubes but even
        more so when using a UV point light source, like Theimers, NuArcs, Olecs
        and the like. Harold Kyle @ Boxcar Press (on the list) sells it,
        together with alot of other fine printing pressroom supplies, should you
        run out of it.

        Regarding halftones I agree with Katie's recent post. Extremely high
        quality fine halftone work can be carried out using a letterpress
        printing press but since the eclipse of specialty makeready systems,
        like Permaton and chalk overlays, you probably wouldn't want to do it
        anyway. If you aim for halftones a better investment would be an
        entry-level offset press, like some of AB Dick's earlier models, which
        can be bought for very modest prices.

        Regarding the Windmill, you shouldn't be afraid, but merely keep a
        healthy respect for it, and any other motorized presses. Even with all
        the guards working fine, a platen press can hurt you very badly, and is
        perhaps more dangerous than a cylinder press. Should you aim for a
        Windmill - which indeed is a remarkable press of which I own two - never
        work by it when you are out of shouting distance to someone until you
        are very, very experienced.

        All the best,
        Mats Broberg

        Stockholm, Sweden
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