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Typesetting comparisons

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  • Katie Harper
    I m embarking on a book project about letterpress printing as it is practiced today. Some of you may have seen postings about this project on other lists. The
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 17, 2003
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      I'm embarking on a book project about letterpress printing as it is
      practiced today. Some of you may have seen postings about this project on
      other lists. The book is entitled "A Letterpress Odyssey: A Journey into the
      Heart of Printing." (For a complete prospectus, please email me.)

      I am weighing the relative merits of setting this book either digitally,
      using photopolymer, or with hot metal, ie, Linotype or Monotype. Since the
      book deals with both traditional and contemporary practices in letterpress,
      any of these methods would be appropriate. The book will be printed by hand
      on a Vandercook, probably on Mohawk Superfine Eggshell 100#.

      I would be interested in any opinions about the relative merits of these
      methods, and/or your experiences with them versus using polymer. Cost is a
      factor, of course, as is the aesthetic merits of how the type will look. One
      very important consideration is quality of typesetting: I can control what
      goes on with polymer, but would have to send out for hot metal, and have had
      wildly mixed results from different typesetters.

      Thanks.


      Katie Harper
      Ars Brevis Press
      Cincinnati, OH
      513-233-9588
      http://www.arsbrevispress.com
    • Fritz Klinke
      Just a stupid suggestion, but why not use all the possibilities? One chapter printed from polymer, one from Monotype, one from Linotype, and one from hand set.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 17, 2003
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        Just a stupid suggestion, but why not use all the possibilities? One chapter
        printed from polymer, one from Monotype, one from Linotype, and one from
        hand set. And if possible, use the same type face for all of them, and this
        would be a good comparison. Even do some pages from mag cuts. And done by
        the same printer on the same paper and press would be interesting to see the
        results.

        Fritz

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Katie Harper" <knharper@...>
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, June 17, 2003 6:54 AM
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] Typesetting comparisons


        I'm embarking on a book project about letterpress printing as it is
        practiced today. Some of you may have seen postings about this project on
        other lists. The book is entitled "A Letterpress Odyssey: A Journey into the
        Heart of Printing." (For a complete prospectus, please email me.)

        I am weighing the relative merits of setting this book either digitally,
        using photopolymer, or with hot metal, ie, Linotype or Monotype. Since the
        book deals with both traditional and contemporary practices in letterpress,
        any of these methods would be appropriate. The book will be printed by hand
        on a Vandercook, probably on Mohawk Superfine Eggshell 100#.

        I would be interested in any opinions about the relative merits of these
        methods, and/or your experiences with them versus using polymer. Cost is a
        factor, of course, as is the aesthetic merits of how the type will look. One
        very important consideration is quality of typesetting: I can control what
        goes on with polymer, but would have to send out for hot metal, and have had
        wildly mixed results from different typesetters.

        Thanks.


        Katie Harper
        Ars Brevis Press
        Cincinnati, OH
        513-233-9588
        http://www.arsbrevispress.com







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      • The Indian Hill Press
        Dear Katie: Back when it was still in publication, Bookways printed a fascinating side-by-side comparison of metal and photopolymer type on the same page.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 17, 2003
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          Dear Katie:

          Back when it was still in publication, Bookways printed a fascinating
          side-by-side comparison of metal and photopolymer type on the same
          page.

          Since your book appears to be a survey, maybe you could print the
          "traditional" chapter in metal type, possibly giving examples of
          Monotype versus Linotype versus foundry type. You could still save
          money by printing the rest of the book from photopolymer, yet you'd
          have provided a valuable real-life sample for the next generation.
          (Think of the hot-metal chapter as a rare butterfly pressed between
          the pages of your book.)

          There is at least one other precedent for this kind of stunt. In The
          Shaping of Our Alphabet by Frank Denman (Knopf, 1955), each chapter
          is set in a completely different metal face. The result may not be
          visually cohesive, but it's a comparative study that remains
          fascinating and valuable.

          Dan Waters
          Indian Hill Press

          >I'm embarking on a book project about letterpress printing as it is
          >practiced today. Some of you may have seen postings about this project on
          >other lists. The book is entitled "A Letterpress Odyssey: A Journey into the
          >Heart of Printing." (For a complete prospectus, please email me.)
          >
          >I am weighing the relative merits of setting this book either digitally,
          >using photopolymer, or with hot metal, ie, Linotype or Monotype. Since the
          >book deals with both traditional and contemporary practices in letterpress,
          >any of these methods would be appropriate. The book will be printed by hand
          >on a Vandercook, probably on Mohawk Superfine Eggshell 100#.
          >
          >I would be interested in any opinions about the relative merits of these
          >methods, and/or your experiences with them versus using polymer. Cost is a
          >factor, of course, as is the aesthetic merits of how the type will look. One
          >very important consideration is quality of typesetting: I can control what
          >goes on with polymer, but would have to send out for hot metal, and have had
          >wildly mixed results from different typesetters.
          >
          >Thanks.
          >
          >
          >Katie Harper
          >Ars Brevis Press
          >Cincinnati, OH
          >513-233-9588
          >http://www.arsbrevispress.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >ï To respond to a post or post a message to the membership:
          >PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          >ï Encountering problems? contact:
          >PPLetterpress-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >ï To unsubscribe:
          >PPLetterpress-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        • Katie Harper
          Fritz & Dan: What crazy suggestions! Crazy like a fox, that is! I think the idea of using various typesetting methods is brilliant, actually, if it would not
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 17, 2003
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            Fritz & Dan:

            What crazy suggestions! Crazy like a fox, that is! I think the idea of using
            various typesetting methods is brilliant, actually, if it would not prove to
            be impossibly cumbersome on press. It would, as you suggest, add a very
            interesting and important dimension to the book. I had actually thought
            about having each of the printers who are subjects of the book print his or
            her own chapter for the deluxe edition, but figured that might be difficult
            to coordinate and time. But your suggestion about the type would be a good
            compromise of sorts (no pun intended). Any suggestions on a good typeface
            that would work with all methods?

            Thank you!

            Katie

            Just a stupid suggestion, but why not use all the possibilities? One chapter
            printed from polymer, one from Monotype, one from Linotype, and one from
            hand set. And if possible, use the same type face for all of them, and this
            would be a good comparison. Even do some pages from mag cuts. And done by
            the same printer on the same paper and press would be interesting to see the
            results.

            Fritz

            > Dear Katie:
            >
            > Back when it was still in publication, Bookways printed a fascinating
            > side-by-side comparison of metal and photopolymer type on the same
            > page.
            >
            > Since your book appears to be a survey, maybe you could print the
            > "traditional" chapter in metal type, possibly giving examples of
            > Monotype versus Linotype versus foundry type. You could still save
            > money by printing the rest of the book from photopolymer, yet you'd
            > have provided a valuable real-life sample for the next generation.
            > (Think of the hot-metal chapter as a rare butterfly pressed between
            > the pages of your book.)
            >
            > There is at least one other precedent for this kind of stunt. In The
            > Shaping of Our Alphabet by Frank Denman (Knopf, 1955), each chapter
            > is set in a completely different metal face. The result may not be
            > visually cohesive, but it's a comparative study that remains
            > fascinating and valuable.
            >
            > Dan Waters
            > Indian Hill Press
            >

            Katie Harper
            Ars Brevis Press
            Cincinnati, OH
            513-233-9588
            http://www.arsbrevispress.com
          • Bruce Kennett Studio
            ... may i chime in with the suggestion of sabon? if only because tschichold (sp?) developed it jointly for foundry, monotype and linotype. do i remember this
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 17, 2003
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              >Any suggestions on a good typeface
              >that would work with all methods?

              may i chime in with the suggestion of sabon? if only because
              tschichold (sp?) developed it jointly for foundry, monotype and
              linotype. do i remember this corrrectly?

              not to mention, it's easy on the eyes.

              bruce
              --


              +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
              Bruce Kennett Studio
              1234 West Side Road
              North Conway NH 03860
              Phone and Fax 603-447-2338
              www.brucekennettstudio.com
              +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
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