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Imprimeries Clandestines

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  • Gerald Lange
    Photos added to the Photos database: Because of an inquiry over at Letpress regarding hooking a bicycle to power a platen press (!), I put up five photos here
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 2, 2003
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      Photos added to the Photos database:

      Because of an inquiry over at Letpress regarding hooking a bicycle to power a platen press (!), I put up five photos here that were taken from the "Imprimeries Clandestines" issue of the French literary journal _Le Point_. This was a special issue released with the cessation of World War II that documented the activities of the French resistance printers. One of these, of course, shows a bicycle-powered press. Several of these printers were executed by the Gestapo.

      Take a look. The second image sort of says it all.

      Gerald
    • Bruce Kennett Studio
      wow! thanks for putting these up for all of us to see. fine images in their own right, too. and you re right about number two showing the risk. for me this
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 3, 2003
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        wow! thanks for putting these up for all of us to see. fine images in
        their own right, too. and you're right about number two showing the
        risk.

        for me this brought back a very powerful memory.

        in april 1977 after i had finished my year of studying book design
        and calligraphy in austria with neugebauer, i came home via paris,
        where i stayed for a month with a friend. that year he'd befriended a
        concert pianist who had subsequently gone on tour and loaned his loft
        space to my friend, so we had marvelous digs for the month i was
        there (this was the left bank, in the rue des plantes).

        my friend krishna was going to be married that summer, back home in
        india -- a very traditional wedding with the actual ceremony in the
        middle of the night at an astrologically-arrived-at auspicious
        moment, several days of feasts with the food served on banana leaves,
        etc. i was not going to be able to attend the wedding, but at least i
        could participate in another way. so i sat at his kitchen table and
        lettered their wedding invitation. i had my own stick ink and pens
        with me, so paper was all i needed, and we found some blue-gridded
        paper at a nearby stationer's. then we set out to find a printer.

        we went into three or four shops in the neighborhood and found all of
        them to be chaotic, indifferent, messy. then the next one we entered
        was immediately obvious as The One. very busy, but everything clear
        and organized. clean floors, lifts of paper well stacked and cared
        for, type banks and stones orderly. so we began talking to the
        proprietor about krishna's job and got more and more firendly with
        himn as time went by, and we went back to okay the proof he'd pulled
        from the cut, etc.

        in time we learned that he'd helped out in the imprimeries
        clandestines as a teenager. his father had been a prime mover in all
        the printing activities. he mentioned, as gerald did in his post,
        that a number of the printers had been executed by the nazis. but he
        also said they'd been extremely clever in choosing their locations --
        typically, the presses were smashed and type dumped on the floor but
        no was one arrested. whenever this happened, they'd simply reorganize
        and find a new location. i was very impressed by his descriptions of
        their quiet and consistent dedication to this. if i recall correctly,
        this man's name was marcel cornu. he did a magnificent job printing
        krishna's invitations, too.

        i felt very privileged to have been in his presence, as he was both a
        consummate craftsman and also a living representative of a time that
        (to me at least) displayed through direct action a lot more courage
        than the sword-rattling rhetoric we have heard in recent press
        conferences. (i apologise for this politicized sentence here, but i
        believe strongly that the members of the french résistance were as
        courageous as anyone, anywhere, anytime.)

        bruce
      • Peter Fraterdeus
        Bruce Thanks for your note, and I agree entirely (not to abuse both mathematics and the language by saying 1000%) with your comments about the French
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 3, 2003
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          Bruce

          Thanks for your note, and I agree entirely (not to abuse both mathematics and the language by saying 1000%) with your comments about the French résistance.

          Any single one of them had more courage and honor than an oil tanker full of right-wing talking heads, or pretend presidents.

          http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Quarters/5278/page9.html

          Lovely work, by the way! (www.brucekennettstudio.com)

          I'm a long time fan of Rudolf Koch, who was a major inspiration, of course, for Prof. Neugebauer.

          PF



          At 7:50 AM -0400 2003-06-03, Bruce Kennett Studio wrote:
          >wow! thanks for putting these up for all of us to see. fine images in
          >their own right, too. and you're right about number two showing the
          >risk.
          >
          >for me this brought back a very powerful memory.
          >...
          >
          >in time we learned that he'd helped out in the imprimeries
          >clandestines as a teenager. his father had been a prime mover in all
          >the printing activities. he mentioned, as gerald did in his post,
          >that a number of the printers had been executed by the nazis. but he
          >also said they'd been extremely clever in choosing their locations --
          >typically, the presses were smashed and type dumped on the floor but
          >no was one arrested. whenever this happened, they'd simply reorganize
          >and find a new location. i was very impressed by his descriptions of
          >their quiet and consistent dedication to this. if i recall correctly,
          >this man's name was marcel cornu. he did a magnificent job printing
          >krishna's invitations, too.
          >
          >i felt very privileged to have been in his presence, as he was both a
          >consummate craftsman and also a living representative of a time that
          >(to me at least) displayed through direct action a lot more courage
          >than the sword-rattling rhetoric we have heard in recent press
          >conferences. (i apologise for this politicized sentence here, but i
          >believe strongly that the members of the french résistance were as
          >courageous as anyone, anywhere, anytime.)
          >
          >bruce


          --
          AzByCx DwEvFu GtHsIr JqKpLo MnNmOl PkQjRi ShTgUf VeWdXc YbZa&@

          Peter Fraterdeus |+ * + * + http://www.alphabets.com
          http://www.fraterdeus.com |* + * + Type and Lettering Design!

          http://www.semiotx.com Web Strategy Consulting < * > Mac OS X
          "Words that work."(tm) Communication Design and Typography
        • Gerald Lange
          Peter It s one thing to admire and respect the courage and honor of these men and women from the distance of time, it s another thing altogether to somehow
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 3, 2003
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            Peter

            It's one thing to admire and respect the courage and honor of these men and
            women from the distance of time, it's another thing altogether to somehow associate that with them in ourselves. At least not until we ourselves are put to the similar test. And then, it would be very much a private thing.

            Gerald

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@d...>
            wrote:
            > Bruce
            >
            > Thanks for your note, and I agree entirely (not to abuse both
            mathematics and the language by saying 1000%) with your comments about
            the French résistance.
            >
            > Any single one of them had more courage and honor than an oil tanker
            full of right-wing talking heads, or pretend presidents.
            >
            > http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Quarters/5278/page9.html
            >
            > Lovely work, by the way! (www.brucekennettstudio.com)
            >
            > I'm a long time fan of Rudolf Koch, who was a major inspiration, of
            course, for Prof. Neugebauer.
            >
            > PF
            >
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