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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: preserving polymer

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  • Gerald Lange
    Yes, Dan, I am sorry to say but that admission does disqualify you. Makes sense about the photopolymer. Thanks. Interesting about the Jello though. We printed
    Message 1 of 35 , May 7, 2003
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      Yes, Dan, I am sorry to say but that admission does disqualify you.

      Makes sense about the photopolymer. Thanks.

      Interesting about the Jello though. We printed collotype a long while
      back and after finding that the industrial grade gelatin didn't work
      well we switched to good old Knox Gelatin. This is a true hydratable
      matrix and does absorb and release water quite willingly and because of
      that a variable in the printing, besides the usual temperature and
      humidity, is atmosphere pressure. We learned why it was called the
      fisherman's process. When the fishing is good, the collotype won't print!!!

      Gerald

      The Indian Hill Press wrote:

      >I can't speak for Bryan, but we are printing from steel-backed
      >plates. I imagine the curling is caused by the polymer shrinking as
      >it dehydrates, while the steel does not. If polymer can slowly
      >relinquish water, then why shouldn't it be able to absorb it again?
      >
      >However, my insight into polymer is based entirely on a lifetime of
      >making and eating Wild Strawberry Jello which, even after it is
      >prepared and has set, can shrink and acquire a concave surface in the
      >refrigerator if it is not covered with Cling Wrap and consumed within
      >a reasonable period. I hope this admission will not disqualify me
      >from receiving future mailings from the PPLetterpress Group.
      >
      >Dan Waters
      >Indian Hill Press
      >
      >
      >
      >>I'm curious about the advice that Bryan and Dan gave here. I don't
      >>doubt this might work but I am wondering why? Does anyone know? Is the
      >>photopolymer matrix actually absorbing water? I don't see how this is
      >>possible. If these are plastic backed plates I can imagine that the
      >>backing is relaxing from the heat? Perhaps the photopolymer as well?
      >>
      >>Gerald
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>Bryan Hutcheson wrote:
      >>When my plates have curled, I find that soaking them in hot water for
      >>a short period of time (5-10 minutes) eliminates the curl and
      >>minimizes the effect on the overall image. The extra hot (not boiling)
      >>water seems to do the trick. I use water that is heated by my coffee
      >>maker, which seems to be an ideal temp.
      >>
      >>Dan Waters wrote:
      >>When a favorite plate (despite the above precautions) has begun to
      >>curl and shows signs of being ready to crack, we soak it for 30
      >>minutes in lukewarm water or until the curl goes away. However, we've
      >>noticed that the image then prints heavier than when the plate was
      >>new - due, no doubt, to water retention and swelling.
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
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    • Harold Kyle
      ... Yes. We re told yes to water overnight, no to vinegar, yes to daily changes of water, yes to 1 cup of bleach when on vacation (to avoid algae), and yes to
      Message 35 of 35 , May 15, 2003
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        On 5/15/03 2:24 AM, "Gerald Lange" <bieler@...> wrote:
        > Quite interesting the difference between different manufacturer's
        > suggestions!!!

        Yes. We're told yes to water overnight, no to vinegar, yes to daily changes
        of water, yes to 1 cup of bleach when on vacation (to avoid algae), and yes
        to Cascade dishwashing detergent monthly (to clean brush). I've never seen
        anything in print, though this has worked well for us. Our plates process
        crisply in the untreated waters of Lake Skaneateles without any acids added.

        Harold


        ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
        Boxcar Press
        Fine Printing and Binding ~ Digital Letterpress Supplies
        640 Fellows Avenue ~ Syracuse, NY 13210
        315-473-0930 ~ phone and fax
        www.boxcarpress.com
        ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
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