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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Nolan Proof press

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  • InkPotJim@aol.com
    In a message dated 4/9/2003 9:02:42 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... David, First of all, yes, my press sounds like yours. It is a Nolan Super Proofer . Second,
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 9, 2003
      In a message dated 4/9/2003 9:02:42 PM Eastern Standard Time,
      davidgoodrich@... writes:

      > Does your press
      > have a roller about three inches in diameter with two steel rods that serve
      > as handles to pull it across? That is the kind mine is, but the gripper
      > you
      > speak of makes it sound as if the paper would attach to a large roller as
      > on
      > a cylinder press.
      >
      > Incidentally, I was interested to learn that some of these were called
      > "sign
      > presses."
      > I got mine to print signs from wood type.
      >

      David,

      First of all, yes, my press sounds like yours. It is a Nolan "Super Proofer".
      Second, here's a link to *exactly* the same press ive seen in operation with
      a gripper -- like I described in my last post:

      <A HREF="http://www.donblack.ca/db/equipment-detail.asp?Link=022">http://www.donblack.ca/db/equipment-detail.asp?Link=022</A>

      This is a small sign press, with a bed approx. 8x12. Look at the black knob &
      lever on the far left side. That lever arm simply articulates (opens) the
      spring loaded gripper fingers (there are 4 you can see). The whole gripper
      assembly there is not type high, so the roller (on the far side of the image)
      backs up and basically sets ready directly above the gripper. You open the
      gripper, align your sheet (to the back of the gripper and along the edge of
      the bed wall, or whatever suits you), and then make the impression. This also
      allows consistent placement of the sheets as well.

      Yes, slurring would occur without tympan and frisket. This is certainly the
      lowest of low tech for making quality impressions. But this thing does do the
      gripping job well, and since it's slightly under type high, it doesnt
      interfere with anything else. Because it's such a small press, you can even
      hold the paper and guide it down while you make the impression, minimizing
      any slurring. But I digress...

      Ive seen tympan & frisket setups for larger proof presses, and will likely
      get there eventually. Like Greg Shattemburg's setup:

      <A HREF="http://www.megalink.net/~shattenb/proof/proof.htm">http://www.megalink.net/~shattenb/proof/proof.htm</A>

      But for now, I'm just concerned with holding the paper tightly, since making
      an impression on a 13x26 proofer is much different than gripping a small
      sheet!

      And yes, I understand that they were called sign presses since many were sold
      to retail stores, department stores, etc. with a simple set of precast blocks
      ("sale", "this rack", "today only") and a set of metal type for making
      prices, etc. If you look at the image, the teeth along the sides of the bed
      and the bars crossing were part of a simple grid locking system so novices
      could easily setup for making the simplest of displays...

      Jim


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • typetom@aol.com
      To prevent most slurring on the Nolan, I use type-high bearers outside the print area on both sides of the type -- so the roller pinches the paper on the
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 9, 2003
        To prevent most slurring on the Nolan, I use type-high bearers outside the
        print area on both sides of the type -- so the roller pinches the paper on
        the bearers before it rolls over the type. I use 18 point brass rule. They
        may leave an indentation in the paper, but they prevent the roller from
        bouncing up and down between lines of type (my roller is set somewhat
        loosely, so I can vary the paper weight and the packing which is several
        sheets added on top of the paper).

        I have seen a press like this adapted with a tympan and frisket for holding
        the paper in registration -- a simple hinged frame attached to a strip of
        furniture that is locked into one end of the press with a quoin. Seems to me
        a little cumbersome to open and close, with the roller in the way, but it
        ought to function about like a Washington press tympan, holding registration
        and make-ready.

        Best wishes, Tom

        Tom Parson
        Now It's Up To You Publications
        157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
        (303) 777-8951
        http://members.aol.com/typetom
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