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Does the emulsion side of film matter?

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  • Ian
    Hello all Sometimes I receive negatives from my film producer with the emulsion side down instead of up. I am guessing they keep the image setter set up for
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 25, 2013
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      Hello all

      Sometimes I receive negatives from my film producer with the emulsion side down instead of up. I am guessing they keep the image setter set up for offset printers most of the time. If I expose plates with the non emulsion side will this affect the quality of the plate. My main concern is reverse images.

      Thanks
      Ian
    • Eric
      ... If I expose plates with the non emulsion side will this affect the quality of the plate. My main concern is reverse images. ... The plates will be
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 25, 2013
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        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Ian" <ductormanpaperboy@...> wrote:
        >
        If I expose plates with the non emulsion side will this affect the quality of the plate. My main concern is reverse images.
        >


        The plates will be unprintable, especially reverses, but really any type of image except the most coarse, as in linoleum cut resolution.
        Any gap between emulsion of film and emulsion of plate will create a spread. With relief photopolymer, having a thicker emulsion, the spread will create softer edge to the image and a filling in of lower body. Positive images thicken, reverse images fill.
        ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS specify right-reading emulsion-up (RR/E-up), no matter how may times you've used a provider before. If the film received is not to what you specified, they must redo the film. If they don't follow clear specs, don't pay for their error, and don't go back.
        --Eric Holub, SF
      • Christian Morrison
        Yes, your lines will be bolder, type will appear bolder. It s a function of exposing through a very thin layer that acts like a spacer.
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 26, 2013
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          Yes, your lines will be bolder, type will appear bolder. It's a function of exposing through a very thin layer that acts like a spacer.
        • Ian Bristow
          Thanks! This is what I had thought was going on. I have had issues lately and was wondering what it was, I will keep scratch testing my film to ensure the
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 26, 2013
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            Thanks!

            This is what I had thought was going on. I have had issues lately and was wondering what it was, I will keep scratch testing my film
            to ensure the emulsion is right.

            Cheers
            Ian

          • Gerald Lange
            Ian Your film should have a discernible dull (emulsion) side and a glossy side. If not, besides scratching, a little trick that can help is to put a small
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 27, 2013
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              Ian

              Your film should have a discernible dull (emulsion) side and a glossy side. If not, besides scratching, a little trick that can help is to put a small capital K or R or similar character off to the side of your file. It will appear noticeably on the film as either right or wrong reading. This would especially help if there is no text on the film. You could block the letter out with a small piece of ruby red lithographers tape (on the glossy side) or scrape from the plate before curing (drying).

              3M makes a pretty good litho tape (Scotch #616, "Paklon").

              Gerald

              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Ian Bristow <ductormanpaperboy@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks!
              >
              > This is what I had thought was going on. I have had issues lately and was wondering what it was, I will keep scratch testing my film
              > to ensure the emulsion is right.
              >
              > Cheers
              > Ian
              >
            • Eric
              Gerald, how can any element of the image indicate emulsion side? Service bureau can do output correctly for letterpress, right-reading emulsion-up, or more
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 28, 2013
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                Gerald, how can any element of the image indicate emulsion side? Service bureau can do output correctly for letterpress, right-reading emulsion-up, or more often from a industry standpoint, correctly for offset, right-reading emulsion-down, from the very same file images.
                Scratch test is definitive for emulsion.
                I haven't tried this with processed film, but in the darkroom a way to tell emulsion side of raw film was to close your lips over a corner of the sheet. The inner miuth would stick to the emulsion side.
                --Eic Holub, SF
              • Ed Inman
                Can t say I ve ever put film to my lips, but just about any Lith or Rapid Access film I ve seen will be dark on the base side and lighter on the emulsion side
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 28, 2013
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                  Can't say I've ever put film to my lips, but just about any Lith or Rapid Access film I've seen will be dark on the base side and lighter on the emulsion side under a standard ortho red safelight. I used lith film for years but recently changed to Rapid Access Hard Dot film. I like it because it exposes and develops faster and the chemistry is less expensive and more stable--no more having to mix & discard one-shot A&B solutions. --Ed

                  -----Original Message-----
                  >From: Eric <Megalonyx@...>
                  >Sent: Aug 28, 2013 10:15 AM
                  >To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Does the emulsion side of film matter?
                  >
                  >Gerald, how can any element of the image indicate emulsion side? Service bureau can do output correctly for letterpress, right-reading emulsion-up, or more often from a industry standpoint, correctly for offset, right-reading emulsion-down, from the very same file images.
                  >Scratch test is definitive for emulsion.
                  >I haven't tried this with processed film, but in the darkroom a way to tell emulsion side of raw film was to close your lips over a corner of the sheet. The inner miuth would stick to the emulsion side.
                  >--Eic Holub, SF
                  >
                  >
                  >
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