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Re: Polimero platemaker question not answered

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  • hersomwally
    Thanks for the tips guys. I ll try and clean the brushes and hopefully they can be resurrected. They actually don t look too bad, just a little crispy.
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 19, 2012
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      Thanks for the tips guys. I'll try and clean the brushes and hopefully they can be resurrected. They actually don't look too bad, just a little crispy. We'll see... I may be asking you guys for resources for new brushes!

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <Megalonyx@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Bruce <pcpete100@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.
      > >
      >
      > Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a paintbrush comb from the hardware store (that is all I needed with my used synthhetic bristle processor), but that won't get all the way down to the base of the bristle.
      > New brushes, new krene, new lamps--these things can only be an improvement. And while it may be expensive, it will be cheaper in the long run than remaking plate after plate--that really runs into money.
      > Eric Holub, SF.
      >
    • Rick
      On another note, if you are having problems getting your exposed to stick to the green rubber like washout plate, try swabbing that with acetone. I am nursing
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 20, 2012
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        On another note, if you are having problems getting your exposed to stick to the green rubber like washout plate, try swabbing that with acetone. I am nursing mine along this way.

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "hersomwally" <cwhersom@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for the tips guys. I'll try and clean the brushes and hopefully they can be resurrected. They actually don't look too bad, just a little crispy. We'll see... I may be asking you guys for resources for new brushes!
        >
        > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <Megalonyx@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Bruce <pcpete100@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.
        > > >
        > >
        > > Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a paintbrush comb from the hardware store (that is all I needed with my used synthhetic bristle processor), but that won't get all the way down to the base of the bristle.
        > > New brushes, new krene, new lamps--these things can only be an improvement. And while it may be expensive, it will be cheaper in the long run than remaking plate after plate--that really runs into money.
        > > Eric Holub, SF.
        > >
        >
      • Peter Bruce
        Eric, You re right - should be cautious. There are potentially a lot of different types of brushes it seems. We ve not had a problem. Merry Christmas All...
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 21, 2012
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          Eric,

          You're right - should be cautious. There are potentially a lot of different types of brushes it seems. We've not had a problem.

          Merry Christmas All...


          From: Eric <Megalonyx@...>
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2012 2:40 PM
          Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Polimero platemaker question not answered

           


          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Bruce <pcpete100@...> wrote:
          >
          > I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.
          >

          Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a paintbrush comb from the hardware store (that is all I needed with my used synthhetic bristle processor), but that won't get all the way down to the base of the bristle.
          New brushes, new krene, new lamps--these things can only be an improvement. And while it may be expensive, it will be cheaper in the long run than remaking plate after plate--that really runs into money.
          Eric Holub, SF.



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