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Polimero platemaker question not answered

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  • Gerald Lange
    Someone sent a message about a Polimero platemaker either yesterday or the day before and I mistakenly didn t realize it was sent to me as owner of the list
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 17, 2012
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      Someone sent a message about a Polimero platemaker either yesterday or the day before and I mistakenly didn't realize it was sent to me as owner of the list rather than to the list itself. I assumed it went to the list and let it go. At any rate, in the maelstrom, most emails received, if not acted upon, were deleted. SORRY whoever you are.

      Please resend.

      Gerald
    • hersomwally
      That may have been me. I didn t actually ask a question yet, I had only asked to join the group because I just bought a Polimero A4 platemaker. I will
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 18, 2012
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        That may have been me. I didn't actually ask a question yet, I had only asked to join the group because I just bought a Polimero A4 platemaker. I will probably have lots of questions once I get it up and running, but my first order of business is to clean the dried polymer out of the washout tank and brushes. Should I use pure vinegar or a diluted solution? or some other cleaning agent?
        Thanks,
        Wally

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" wrote:

        Someone sent a message about a Polimero platemaker either yesterday or the day before and I mistakenly didn't realize it was sent to me as owner of the list rather than to the list itself. I assumed it went to the list and let it go. At any rate, in the maelstrom, most emails received, if not acted upon, were deleted. SORRY whoever you are.

        Please resend.

        Gerald
      • Gerald Lange
        Hi Wally Thanks for responding. Sorry about the dropped email. Hard to sort through all that junk sometimes. Especially during the holidays with all the sales
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 18, 2012
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          Hi Wally

          Thanks for responding. Sorry about the dropped email. Hard to sort
          through all that junk sometimes. Especially during the holidays with all
          the sales crap and promotions.

          I have this on brush cleaning:

          http://bielerpressxi.blogspot.com/2006/05/brush-maintenance-and-adjustment.html

          But, actually, once all that gunk is in the brushes, they are toast, or
          certainly on their way. You can use a steel brush to work them into
          condition but it is just a stopgap measure. Though expensive, it is
          probably best just to change out the brushes when they start looking
          bad, and certainly, if they seem to cause problems.

          In regard to the tank. I use a cup of vinegar for the bath during daily
          operation, but I doubt it would work well to clean up the dried polymer.
          Anything that you do use would require you to remove the brush unit. As
          I recall the Polimero has a wood plate with horse hair? any chemical
          used on those would do them in.

          Undiluted muriatic acid will do the job of cleaning the bath unit quite
          nicely but it is quite dangerous. First time I ever tried it, it smoked
          up and ate the plastic film off the lenses of my glasses, in about a
          second. And it you breathe it in or get it on your skin you are in a
          heap of trouble. I've tried the diluted version of it and it seems like
          a complete waste of time. Same with CLR. Best I have found so far is
          Tilex Mold & Mildew stain remover. I spray it on, wipe it around a bit,
          and then come back the next day and scrub off the white powder that is
          left (and flush out the bath a couple of times). I bought some 409 Stone
          and Steel Stain remover a while back but have not yet tried it.

          Best thing of course is just to not let the stuff accumulate in the
          first place. Especially during the warmer months. Basically drain and
          flush the bath every day—or else. Sometimes that is not possible, but
          you do pay for the neglect. Reminds me, have to do that yet today.

          There are a number of posts here concerning this. There is also a file
          on site regarding installation instructions for the Polimero, but it is
          not a manual in any way. It does mention though, to avoid pouring water
          directly on the brush. That will screw them up quite badly.

          Good luck.

          Gerald
          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



          On 12/18/12 3:02 PM, hersomwally wrote:
          > That may have been me. I didn't actually ask a question yet, I had only asked to join the group because I just bought a Polimero A4 platemaker. I will probably have lots of questions once I get it up and running, but my first order of business is to clean the dried polymer out of the washout tank and brushes. Should I use pure vinegar or a diluted solution? or some other cleaning agent?
          > Thanks,
          > Wally
          >
          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange" wrote:
          >
          > Someone sent a message about a Polimero platemaker either yesterday or the day before and I mistakenly didn't realize it was sent to me as owner of the list rather than to the list itself. I assumed it went to the list and let it go. At any rate, in the maelstrom, most emails received, if not acted upon, were deleted. SORRY whoever you are.
          >
          > Please resend.
          >
          > Gerald
          >
        • Peter Bruce
          I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it s used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald s nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 19, 2012
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            I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.

            PC


            From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>
            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, December 18, 2012 11:54 PM
            Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Polimero platemaker question not answered

            Hi Wally

            Thanks for responding. Sorry about the dropped email. Hard to sort
            through all that junk sometimes. Especially during the holidays with all
            the sales crap and promotions.

            I have this on brush cleaning:

            http://bielerpressxi.blogspot.com/2006/05/brush-maintenance-and-adjustment.html

            But, actually, once all that gunk is in the brushes, they are toast, or
            certainly on their way. You can use a steel brush to work them into
            condition but it is just a stopgap measure. Though expensive, it is
            probably best just to change out the brushes when they start looking
            bad, and certainly, if they seem to cause problems.

            In regard to the tank. I use a cup of vinegar for the bath during daily
            operation, but I doubt it would work well to clean up the dried polymer.
            Anything that you do use would require you to remove the brush unit. As
            I recall the Polimero has a wood plate with horse hair? any chemical
            used on those would do them in.

            Undiluted muriatic acid will do the job of cleaning the bath unit quite
            nicely but it is quite dangerous. First time I ever tried it, it smoked
            up and ate the plastic film off the lenses of my glasses, in about a
            second. And it you breathe it in or get it on your skin you are in a
            heap of trouble. I've tried the diluted version of it and it seems like
            a complete waste of time. Same with CLR. Best I have found so far is
            Tilex Mold & Mildew stain remover. I spray it on, wipe it around a bit,
            and then come back the next day and scrub off the white powder that is
            left (and flush out the bath a couple of times). I bought some 409 Stone
            and Steel Stain remover a while back but have not yet tried it.

            Best thing of course is just to not let the stuff accumulate in the
            first place. Especially during the warmer months. Basically drain and
            flush the bath every day—or else. Sometimes that is not possible, but
            you do pay for the neglect. Reminds me, have to do that yet today.

            There are a number of posts here concerning this. There is also a file
            on site regarding installation instructions for the Polimero, but it is
            not a manual in any way. It does mention though, to avoid pouring water
            directly on the brush. That will screw them up quite badly.

            Good luck.

            Gerald
            http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



            On 12/18/12 3:02 PM, hersomwally wrote:
            > That may have been me.  I didn't actually ask a question yet, I had only asked to join the group because I just bought a Polimero A4 platemaker.  I will probably have lots of questions once I get it up and running, but my first order of business is to clean the dried polymer out of the washout tank and brushes.  Should I use pure vinegar or a diluted solution? or some other cleaning agent?
            > Thanks,
            > Wally
            >
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Gerald Lange"  wrote:
            >
            >  Someone sent a message about a Polimero platemaker either yesterday or the day before and I mistakenly didn't realize it was sent to me as owner of the list rather than to the list itself. I assumed it went to the list and let it go. At any rate, in the maelstrom, most emails received, if not acted upon, were deleted. SORRY whoever you are.
            >
            >  Please resend.
            >
            >  Gerald
            >




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          • Eric
            ... Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 19, 2012
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              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Bruce <pcpete100@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.
              >

              Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a paintbrush comb from the hardware store (that is all I needed with my used synthhetic bristle processor), but that won't get all the way down to the base of the bristle.
              New brushes, new krene, new lamps--these things can only be an improvement. And while it may be expensive, it will be cheaper in the long run than remaking plate after plate--that really runs into money.
              Eric Holub, SF.
            • hersomwally
              Thanks for the tips guys. I ll try and clean the brushes and hopefully they can be resurrected. They actually don t look too bad, just a little crispy.
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 19, 2012
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                Thanks for the tips guys. I'll try and clean the brushes and hopefully they can be resurrected. They actually don't look too bad, just a little crispy. We'll see... I may be asking you guys for resources for new brushes!

                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <Megalonyx@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Bruce <pcpete100@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.
                > >
                >
                > Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a paintbrush comb from the hardware store (that is all I needed with my used synthhetic bristle processor), but that won't get all the way down to the base of the bristle.
                > New brushes, new krene, new lamps--these things can only be an improvement. And while it may be expensive, it will be cheaper in the long run than remaking plate after plate--that really runs into money.
                > Eric Holub, SF.
                >
              • Rick
                On another note, if you are having problems getting your exposed to stick to the green rubber like washout plate, try swabbing that with acetone. I am nursing
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 20, 2012
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                  On another note, if you are having problems getting your exposed to stick to the green rubber like washout plate, try swabbing that with acetone. I am nursing mine along this way.

                  --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "hersomwally" <cwhersom@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks for the tips guys. I'll try and clean the brushes and hopefully they can be resurrected. They actually don't look too bad, just a little crispy. We'll see... I may be asking you guys for resources for new brushes!
                  >
                  > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <Megalonyx@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Bruce <pcpete100@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a paintbrush comb from the hardware store (that is all I needed with my used synthhetic bristle processor), but that won't get all the way down to the base of the bristle.
                  > > New brushes, new krene, new lamps--these things can only be an improvement. And while it may be expensive, it will be cheaper in the long run than remaking plate after plate--that really runs into money.
                  > > Eric Holub, SF.
                  > >
                  >
                • Peter Bruce
                  Eric, You re right - should be cautious. There are potentially a lot of different types of brushes it seems. We ve not had a problem. Merry Christmas All...
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 21, 2012
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                    Eric,

                    You're right - should be cautious. There are potentially a lot of different types of brushes it seems. We've not had a problem.

                    Merry Christmas All...


                    From: Eric <Megalonyx@...>
                    To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, December 19, 2012 2:40 PM
                    Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Polimero platemaker question not answered

                     


                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Bruce <pcpete100@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I have found Acetone dissolves polymer deposits well, it's used in the glass fibre industry too but Gerald's nailed it I think - if you have a lot of deposits in your brushes you'll need new brushes to get good washout.
                    >

                    Not all brushes are the same. Synthetic brushes might not like acetone at all. Even natural bristles might be more easily cleaned with hot water and a paintbrush comb from the hardware store (that is all I needed with my used synthhetic bristle processor), but that won't get all the way down to the base of the bristle.
                    New brushes, new krene, new lamps--these things can only be an improvement. And while it may be expensive, it will be cheaper in the long run than remaking plate after plate--that really runs into money.
                    Eric Holub, SF.



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