Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Photopolymer versus linoleum block

Expand Messages
  • bryan kring
    Hello, Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids better, linoleum block or photopolymer? I have some artwork that I am preparing to send
    Message 1 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello,

      Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids better, linoleum block or photopolymer?

      I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy the plates.

      thanks,
      bryan
    • Peter Fraterdeus
      Hi Bryan Are you working on a cylinder press or platen? I m not sure if there s a lot of difference in which surface will print better. Certainly it s as much
      Message 2 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Bryan

        Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?

        I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will print better.
        Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as about the relief material.

        >> a few areas of large simple solid shapes

        How large is large?

        If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It makes all the difference!

        P


        Peter Fraterdeus
        Exquisite letterpress takes time™
        http://slowprint.com/
        tweet: @slowprint

        IdeasWords : Idea Swords
        Communication Strategy
        Semiotx.com @ideaswords

        On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:

        > Hello,
        >
        > Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
        >
        > I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy the plates.
        >
        > thanks,
        > bryan
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • bryan kring
        Thanks, My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P. The largest shape is about 5 x5 . In a separate color, there are several 1 x1 shapes that will print on top of the
        Message 3 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks,

          My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.

          The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid. line art will print over all of the solids.

          The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I plan on dampening it before printing.


          As a separate question:

          In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of it I have some cushion to press into.

          Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on overprinting would be very much appreciated.

          bryan kring



          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Bryan
          >
          > Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
          >
          > I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will print better.
          > Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as about the relief material.
          >
          > >> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
          >
          > How large is large?
          >
          > If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It makes all the difference!
          >
          > P
          >
          >
          > Peter Fraterdeus
          > Exquisite letterpress takes time™
          > http://slowprint.com/
          > tweet: @slowprint
          >
          > IdeasWords : Idea Swords
          > Communication Strategy
          > Semiotx.com @ideaswords
          >
          > On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
          >
          > > Hello,
          > >
          > > Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
          > >
          > > I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy the plates.
          > >
          > > thanks,
          > > bryan
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Peter Fraterdeus
          Hi Bryan Yeah, printing a 5x5 solid on a 10x15 will be pushing the limits of that press for sure. You will not get a lot of impression across that much
          Message 4 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Bryan

            Yeah, printing a 5x5" solid on a 10x15" will be pushing the limits of that press for sure.
            You will not get a lot of impression across that much surface, of course.
            Dampening will help. If it's a light color the effect should be fine. The darker the color, the less solid it appears given the same inking. Platen presses are not great for this type of work, since the surface hits all at once... But you probably know that ;-)

            Printing over that surface should not be a problem unless you're using rubber base inks, in which case the second ink will take forever to dry. With oil-based inks this is not an issue at all.
            Assuming your fine-art paper is not coated, you shouldn't have problems with offsetting.

            Sounds like you're on the right path!
            Let us know how it goes!

            Cheers

            Peter

            Peter Fraterdeus
            Exquisite letterpress takes time™
            http://slowprint.com/
            tweet: @slowprint

            IdeasWords : Idea Swords
            Communication Strategy
            Semiotx.com @ideaswords

            On 19 Sep 2011, at 6:33 PM, bryan kring wrote:

            > Thanks,
            >
            > My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
            >
            > The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid. line art will print over all of the solids.
            >
            > The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I plan on dampening it before printing.
            >
            >
            > As a separate question:
            >
            > In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of it I have some cushion to press into.
            >
            > Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on overprinting would be very much appreciated.
            >
            > bryan kring
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> Hi Bryan
            >>
            >> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
            >>
            >> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will print better.
            >> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as about the relief material.
            >>
            >>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
            >>
            >> How large is large?
            >>
            >> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It makes all the difference!
            >>
            >> P
            >>
            >>
            >> Peter Fraterdeus
            >> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
            >> http://slowprint.com/
            >> tweet: @slowprint
            >>
            >> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
            >> Communication Strategy
            >> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
            >>
            >> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
            >>
            >>> Hello,
            >>>
            >>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
            >>>
            >>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy the plates.
            >>>
            >>> thanks,
            >>> bryan
            >>>
          • Gerald Lange
            Bryan I think you are correct about the separate question. Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element, and often benefits by not being
            Message 5 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Bryan

              I think you are correct about the separate question.

              Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element, and often benefits by not being the same.

              I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a linocut, hands down.

              What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.

              Gerald
              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring" <bryan@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
              >
              > The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid. line art will print over all of the solids.
              >
              > The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I plan on dampening it before printing.
              >
              >
              > As a separate question:
              >
              > In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of it I have some cushion to press into.
              >
              > Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on overprinting would be very much appreciated.
              >
              > bryan kring
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Bryan
              > >
              > > Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
              > >
              > > I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will print better.
              > > Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as about the relief material.
              > >
              > > >> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
              > >
              > > How large is large?
              > >
              > > If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It makes all the difference!
              > >
              > > P
              > >
              > >
              > > Peter Fraterdeus
              > > Exquisite letterpress takes time™
              > > http://slowprint.com/
              > > tweet: @slowprint
              > >
              > > IdeasWords : Idea Swords
              > > Communication Strategy
              > > Semiotx.com @ideaswords
              > >
              > > On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
              > >
              > > > Hello,
              > > >
              > > > Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
              > > >
              > > > I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy the plates.
              > > >
              > > > thanks,
              > > > bryan
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > ------------------------------------
              > > >
              > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Scott Rubel
              Gerald, This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my C&P a few days ago. What is supposed to go wrong? --Scott
              Message 6 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Gerald,

                This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                C&P a few days ago.

                What is supposed to go wrong?

                --Scott

                On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                > Bryan
                >
                > I think you are correct about the separate question.
                >
                > Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                > and often benefits by not being the same.
                >
                > I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                > linocut, hands down.
                >
                > What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                > C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                >
                > Gerald
                > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                >
                > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring" <bryan@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> Thanks,
                >>
                >> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                >>
                >> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                >> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                >> line art will print over all of the solids.
                >>
                >> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                >> plan on dampening it before printing.
                >>
                >>
                >> As a separate question:
                >>
                >> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                >> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                >> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                >> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                >> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                >> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                >> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                >> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                >> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                >> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                >> it I have some cushion to press into.
                >>
                >> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                >> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                >>
                >> bryan kring
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@>
                >> wrote:
                >>>
                >>> Hi Bryan
                >>>
                >>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                >>>
                >>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                >>> print better.
                >>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                >>> about the relief material.
                >>>
                >>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                >>>
                >>> How large is large?
                >>>
                >>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                >>> makes all the difference!
                >>>
                >>> P
                >>>
                >>>
                >>> Peter Fraterdeus
                >>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                >>> http://slowprint.com/
                >>> tweet: @slowprint
                >>>
                >>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                >>> Communication Strategy
                >>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                >>>
                >>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                >>>
                >>>> Hello,
                >>>>
                >>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                >>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                >>>>
                >>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                >>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                >>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                >>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                >>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                >>>> the plates.
                >>>>
                >>>> thanks,
                >>>> bryan
                >>>>
                >>>>
                >>>>
                >>>> ------------------------------------
                >>>>
                >>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                >>>>
                >>>>
                >>>>
                >>>
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Gerald Lange
                Hi Scott I m asking how it is done. Doesn t do anyone any good if the explanation is always, I did and it worked out great. Gerald
                Message 7 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Scott

                  I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                  is always, I did and it worked out great.

                  Gerald



                  On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                  > Gerald,
                  >
                  > This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                  > C&P a few days ago.
                  >
                  > What is supposed to go wrong?
                  >
                  > --Scott
                  >
                  > On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                  >
                  >> Bryan
                  >>
                  >> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                  >>
                  >> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                  >> and often benefits by not being the same.
                  >>
                  >> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                  >> linocut, hands down.
                  >>
                  >> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                  >> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                  >>
                  >> Gerald
                  >> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                  >>
                  >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@...> wrote:
                  >>> Thanks,
                  >>>
                  >>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                  >>>
                  >>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                  >>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                  >>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                  >>>
                  >>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                  >>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> As a separate question:
                  >>>
                  >>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                  >>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                  >>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                  >>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                  >>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                  >>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                  >>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                  >>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                  >>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                  >>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                  >>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                  >>>
                  >>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                  >>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                  >>>
                  >>> bryan kring
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                  >>> wrote:
                  >>>> Hi Bryan
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                  >>>>
                  >>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                  >>>> print better.
                  >>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                  >>>> about the relief material.
                  >>>>
                  >>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                  >>>> How large is large?
                  >>>>
                  >>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                  >>>> makes all the difference!
                  >>>>
                  >>>> P
                  >>>>
                  >>>>
                  >>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                  >>>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                  >>>> http://slowprint.com/
                  >>>> tweet: @slowprint
                  >>>>
                  >>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                  >>>> Communication Strategy
                  >>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                  >>>>
                  >>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                  >>>>
                  >>>>> Hello,
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                  >>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                  >>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                  >>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                  >>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                  >>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                  >>>>> the plates.
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> thanks,
                  >>>>> bryan
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> ------------------------------------
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>>>>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> ------------------------------------
                  >>
                  >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • David McNamara
                  The way I ve done it is: I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that you can get from craft stores that florists use for
                  Message 8 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    The way I've done it is:

                    I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                    you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                    got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                    cheap Tupperware).

                    Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                    they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                    doors of the mini-fridge.

                    Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                    the shelving from marking the paper.

                    Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                    impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                    mold.)

                    (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                    fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                    from the paper.)

                    (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                    overkill.)

                    Hope that helps.
                    __

                    David
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...>
                    To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                    Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block


                    Hi Scott

                    I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                    is always, I did and it worked out great.

                    Gerald



                    On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                    > Gerald,
                    >
                    > This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                    > C&P a few days ago.
                    >
                    > What is supposed to go wrong?
                    >
                    > --Scott
                    >
                    > On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                    >
                    >> Bryan
                    >>
                    >> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                    >>
                    >> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                    >> and often benefits by not being the same.
                    >>
                    >> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                    >> linocut, hands down.
                    >>
                    >> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                    >> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                    >>
                    >> Gerald
                    >> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                    >>
                    >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@...> wrote:
                    >>> Thanks,
                    >>>
                    >>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                    >>>
                    >>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                    >>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                    >>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                    >>>
                    >>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                    >>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> As a separate question:
                    >>>
                    >>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                    >>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                    >>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                    >>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                    >>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                    >>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                    >>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                    >>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                    >>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                    >>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                    >>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                    >>>
                    >>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                    >>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                    >>>
                    >>> bryan kring
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>>
                    >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                    >>> wrote:
                    >>>> Hi Bryan
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                    >>>>
                    >>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                    >>>> print better.
                    >>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                    >>>> about the relief material.
                    >>>>
                    >>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                    >>>> How large is large?
                    >>>>
                    >>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                    >>>> makes all the difference!
                    >>>>
                    >>>> P
                    >>>>
                    >>>>
                    >>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                    >>>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                    >>>> http://slowprint.com/
                    >>>> tweet: @slowprint
                    >>>>
                    >>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                    >>>> Communication Strategy
                    >>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                    >>>>
                    >>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                    >>>>
                    >>>>> Hello,
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                    >>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                    >>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                    >>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                    >>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                    >>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                    >>>>> the plates.
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> thanks,
                    >>>>> bryan
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> ------------------------------------
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>>
                    >>>>>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >> ------------------------------------
                    >>
                    >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >




                    ------------------------------------

                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                  • Scott Rubel
                    Sorry about that. I thought there was something about the C&P that made this difficult. How I ve done it in the old days is to spritz every other sheet or two
                    Message 9 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Sorry about that. I thought there was something about the C&P that
                      made this difficult.

                      How I've done it in the old days is to spritz every other sheet or two
                      of paper and stack it all. After a fairly short while all sheets are
                      about the same softness or moisture.

                      You can tell I'm not a scientist, but since I do mostly commercial
                      work I really don't want to dampen any paper at all because I'm in a
                      hurry. The other day I had to do it in a hurry. I was printing on an
                      unfamiliar deckled sheet that had so much gelatin in it that it would
                      not make much of an impression. I had not planned on it or charged for
                      it, but I ended up having to take the extra time to moisten it and I
                      did it by the method mentioned above. Happy customer with no idea how
                      it had to get done.

                      --Scott

                      On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:51 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                      > Hi Scott
                      >
                      > I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the
                      > explanation
                      > is always, I did and it worked out great.
                      >
                      > Gerald
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                      >> Gerald,
                      >>
                      >> This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                      >> C&P a few days ago.
                      >>
                      >> What is supposed to go wrong?
                      >>
                      >> --Scott
                      >>
                      >> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                      >>
                      >>> Bryan
                      >>>
                      >>> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                      >>>
                      >>> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                      >>> and often benefits by not being the same.
                      >>>
                      >>> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                      >>> linocut, hands down.
                      >>>
                      >>> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                      >>> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                      >>>
                      >>> Gerald
                      >>> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                      >>>
                      >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@...>
                      >>> wrote:
                      >>>> Thanks,
                      >>>>
                      >>>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                      >>>>
                      >>>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                      >>>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                      >>>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                      >>>>
                      >>>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                      >>>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>> As a separate question:
                      >>>>
                      >>>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                      >>>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                      >>>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                      >>>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                      >>>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                      >>>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                      >>>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                      >>>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                      >>>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                      >>>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                      >>>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                      >>>>
                      >>>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                      >>>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                      >>>>
                      >>>> bryan kring
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>>
                      >>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                      >>>> wrote:
                      >>>>> Hi Bryan
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                      >>>>> print better.
                      >>>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                      >>>>> about the relief material.
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                      >>>>> How large is large?
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                      >>>>> makes all the difference!
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> P
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                      >>>>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                      >>>>> http://slowprint.com/
                      >>>>> tweet: @slowprint
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                      >>>>> Communication Strategy
                      >>>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                      >>>>>
                      >>>>>> Hello,
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                      >>>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                      >>>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                      >>>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                      >>>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                      >>>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                      >>>>>> the plates.
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>> thanks,
                      >>>>>> bryan
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>> ------------------------------------
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>>>>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>> ------------------------------------
                      >>>
                      >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >> ------------------------------------
                      >>
                      >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Gerald Lange
                      Hi David Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is
                      Message 10 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi David

                        Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.

                        Gerald



                        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > The way I've done it is:
                        >
                        > I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                        > you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                        > got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                        > cheap Tupperware).
                        >
                        > Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                        > they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                        > doors of the mini-fridge.
                        >
                        > Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                        > the shelving from marking the paper.
                        >
                        > Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                        > impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                        > mold.)
                        >
                        > (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                        > fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                        > from the paper.)
                        >
                        > (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                        > overkill.)
                        >
                        > Hope that helps.
                        > __
                        >
                        > David
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...>
                        > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                        > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                        >
                        >
                        > Hi Scott
                        >
                        > I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                        > is always, I did and it worked out great.
                        >
                        > Gerald
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                        > > Gerald,
                        > >
                        > > This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                        > > C&P a few days ago.
                        > >
                        > > What is supposed to go wrong?
                        > >
                        > > --Scott
                        > >
                        > > On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                        > >
                        > >> Bryan
                        > >>
                        > >> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                        > >>
                        > >> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                        > >> and often benefits by not being the same.
                        > >>
                        > >> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                        > >> linocut, hands down.
                        > >>
                        > >> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                        > >> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                        > >>
                        > >> Gerald
                        > >> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                        > >>
                        > >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                        > >>> Thanks,
                        > >>>
                        > >>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                        > >>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                        > >>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                        > >>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                        > >>>
                        > >>>
                        > >>> As a separate question:
                        > >>>
                        > >>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                        > >>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                        > >>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                        > >>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                        > >>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                        > >>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                        > >>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                        > >>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                        > >>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                        > >>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                        > >>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                        > >>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> bryan kring
                        > >>>
                        > >>>
                        > >>>
                        > >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                        > >>> wrote:
                        > >>>> Hi Bryan
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                        > >>>> print better.
                        > >>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                        > >>>> about the relief material.
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                        > >>>> How large is large?
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                        > >>>> makes all the difference!
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> P
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                        > >>>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                        > >>>> http://slowprint.com/
                        > >>>> tweet: @slowprint
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                        > >>>> Communication Strategy
                        > >>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                        > >>>>
                        > >>>>> Hello,
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                        > >>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                        > >>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                        > >>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                        > >>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                        > >>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                        > >>>>> the plates.
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> thanks,
                        > >>>>> bryan
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> ------------------------------------
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>>>>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >> ------------------------------------
                        > >>
                        > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > ------------------------------------
                        > >
                        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        >
                      • David McNamara
                        Gerald, I didn t suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might
                        Message 11 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Gerald,
                           
                          I didn't suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might benefit.
                           
                          As for feeding, except for fairly light stock, I've never had a problem with it. It handles largely like un-dampened paper. In fact, if anything, I think there's a little more grip and easier sheet separation. Anything 70#t or higher is stiff enough to stand like a regular sheet (except maybe for larger sheets). If the paper is too flimsy at that weight, I'd propose it's probably too damp...
                          __

                          David
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:15 PM
                          Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block

                           

                          Hi David

                          Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.

                          Gerald

                          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > The way I've done it is:
                          >
                          > I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                          > you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                          > got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                          > cheap Tupperware).
                          >
                          > Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                          > they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                          > doors of the mini-fridge.
                          >
                          > Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                          > the shelving from marking the paper.
                          >
                          > Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                          > impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                          > mold.)
                          >
                          > (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                          > fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                          > from the paper.)
                          >
                          > (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                          > overkill.)
                          >
                          > Hope that helps.
                          > __
                          >
                          > David
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@...>
                          > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                          > Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                          > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                          >
                          >
                          > Hi Scott
                          >
                          > I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                          > is always, I did and it worked out great.
                          >
                          > Gerald
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                          > > Gerald,
                          > >
                          > > This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                          > > C&P a few days ago.
                          > >
                          > > What is supposed to go wrong?
                          > >
                          > > --Scott
                          > >
                          > > On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                          > >
                          > >> Bryan
                          > >>
                          > >> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                          > >>
                          > >> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                          > >> and often benefits by not being the same.
                          > >>
                          > >> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                          > >> linocut, hands down.
                          > >>
                          > >> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                          > >> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                          > >>
                          > >> Gerald
                          > >> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                          > >>
                          > >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                          > >>> Thanks,
                          > >>>
                          > >>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                          > >>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                          > >>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                          > >>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>> As a separate question:
                          > >>>
                          > >>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                          > >>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                          > >>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                          > >>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                          > >>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                          > >>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                          > >>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                          > >>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                          > >>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                          > >>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                          > >>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                          > >>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                          > >>>
                          > >>> bryan kring
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>>
                          > >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                          > >>> wrote:
                          > >>>> Hi Bryan
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                          > >>>> print better.
                          > >>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                          > >>>> about the relief material.
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                          > >>>> How large is large?
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                          > >>>> makes all the difference!
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> P
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                          > >>>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                          > >>>> http://slowprint.com/
                          > >>>> tweet: @slowprint
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                          > >>>> Communication Strategy
                          > >>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                          > >>>>
                          > >>>>> Hello,
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                          > >>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                          > >>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                          > >>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                          > >>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                          > >>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                          > >>>>> the plates.
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> thanks,
                          > >>>>> bryan
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> ------------------------------------
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>>>>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >> ------------------------------------
                          > >>
                          > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >>
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ------------------------------------
                          > >
                          > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >

                        • Gerald Lange
                          Hi Scott Email certainly sucks as a communication method, huh? What was the paper? I ve generally found that sized paper does not work at all for dampening. I
                          Message 12 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Hi Scott

                            Email certainly sucks as a communication method, huh?

                            What was the paper? I've generally found that sized paper does not work at all for dampening. I guess I am thinking of externally sized watercolor papers. Stonehenge comes to mind. Total piece of crap if dampened, but give it a good whack when dry, all is good!!!!

                            Gerald



                            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Sorry about that. I thought there was something about the C&P that
                            > made this difficult.
                            >
                            > How I've done it in the old days is to spritz every other sheet or two
                            > of paper and stack it all. After a fairly short while all sheets are
                            > about the same softness or moisture.
                            >
                            > You can tell I'm not a scientist, but since I do mostly commercial
                            > work I really don't want to dampen any paper at all because I'm in a
                            > hurry. The other day I had to do it in a hurry. I was printing on an
                            > unfamiliar deckled sheet that had so much gelatin in it that it would
                            > not make much of an impression. I had not planned on it or charged for
                            > it, but I ended up having to take the extra time to moisten it and I
                            > did it by the method mentioned above. Happy customer with no idea how
                            > it had to get done.
                            >
                            > --Scott
                            >
                            > On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:51 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                            >
                            > > Hi Scott
                            > >
                            > > I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the
                            > > explanation
                            > > is always, I did and it worked out great.
                            > >
                            > > Gerald
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                            > >> Gerald,
                            > >>
                            > >> This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                            > >> C&P a few days ago.
                            > >>
                            > >> What is supposed to go wrong?
                            > >>
                            > >> --Scott
                            > >>
                            > >> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                            > >>
                            > >>> Bryan
                            > >>>
                            > >>> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                            > >>> and often benefits by not being the same.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                            > >>> linocut, hands down.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                            > >>> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                            > >>>
                            > >>> Gerald
                            > >>> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                            > >>>
                            > >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@>
                            > >>> wrote:
                            > >>>> Thanks,
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                            > >>>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                            > >>>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                            > >>>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> As a separate question:
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                            > >>>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                            > >>>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                            > >>>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                            > >>>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                            > >>>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                            > >>>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                            > >>>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                            > >>>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                            > >>>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                            > >>>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                            > >>>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> bryan kring
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>>
                            > >>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                            > >>>> wrote:
                            > >>>>> Hi Bryan
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                            > >>>>> print better.
                            > >>>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                            > >>>>> about the relief material.
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                            > >>>>> How large is large?
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                            > >>>>> makes all the difference!
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>> P
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                            > >>>>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                            > >>>>> http://slowprint.com/
                            > >>>>> tweet: @slowprint
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                            > >>>>> Communication Strategy
                            > >>>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                            > >>>>>
                            > >>>>>> Hello,
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                            > >>>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                            > >>>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                            > >>>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                            > >>>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                            > >>>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                            > >>>>>> the plates.
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>> thanks,
                            > >>>>>> bryan
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>> ------------------------------------
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>>>>
                            > >>>
                            > >>>
                            > >>>
                            > >>> ------------------------------------
                            > >>>
                            > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > >>>
                            > >>>
                            > >>>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >> ------------------------------------
                            > >>
                            > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >>
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > > ------------------------------------
                            > >
                            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • Gerald Lange
                            Hi David Looks like we are having a night. Okay, let me rephrase this. Are you pulling from a humidor or bag? or is the paper just stacked up, naked as a
                            Message 13 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Hi David

                              Looks like we are having a night. Okay, let me rephrase this. Are you pulling from a humidor or bag? or is the paper just stacked up, naked as a jaybird in the prevailing winds? If so, is there a noticeable difference in the hydration from beginning to end? I guess this is a puzzlement to me because someone once proclaimed they were able to print dampened paper on a Heidelberg and I'm thinking what!?! I thought Wm Everson must be turning in his grave!!!

                              Gerald

                              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Gerald,
                              >
                              > I didn't suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might benefit.
                              >
                              > As for feeding, except for fairly light stock, I've never had a problem with it. It handles largely like un-dampened paper. In fact, if anything, I think there's a little more grip and easier sheet separation. Anything 70#t or higher is stiff enough to stand like a regular sheet (except maybe for larger sheets). If the paper is too flimsy at that weight, I'd propose it's probably too damp...
                              > __
                              >
                              > David
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: Gerald Lange
                              > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                              > Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:15 PM
                              > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Hi David
                              >
                              > Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.
                              >
                              > Gerald
                              >
                              > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > The way I've done it is:
                              > >
                              > > I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                              > > you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                              > > got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                              > > cheap Tupperware).
                              > >
                              > > Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                              > > they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                              > > doors of the mini-fridge.
                              > >
                              > > Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                              > > the shelving from marking the paper.
                              > >
                              > > Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                              > > impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                              > > mold.)
                              > >
                              > > (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                              > > fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                              > > from the paper.)
                              > >
                              > > (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                              > > overkill.)
                              > >
                              > > Hope that helps.
                              > > __
                              > >
                              > > David
                              > > ----- Original Message -----
                              > > From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@>
                              > > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                              > > Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                              > > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Hi Scott
                              > >
                              > > I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                              > > is always, I did and it worked out great.
                              > >
                              > > Gerald
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                              > > > Gerald,
                              > > >
                              > > > This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                              > > > C&P a few days ago.
                              > > >
                              > > > What is supposed to go wrong?
                              > > >
                              > > > --Scott
                              > > >
                              > > > On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > >> Bryan
                              > > >>
                              > > >> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                              > > >>
                              > > >> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                              > > >> and often benefits by not being the same.
                              > > >>
                              > > >> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                              > > >> linocut, hands down.
                              > > >>
                              > > >> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                              > > >> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                              > > >>
                              > > >> Gerald
                              > > >> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                              > > >>
                              > > >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                              > > >>> Thanks,
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                              > > >>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                              > > >>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                              > > >>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> As a separate question:
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                              > > >>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                              > > >>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                              > > >>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                              > > >>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                              > > >>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                              > > >>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                              > > >>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                              > > >>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                              > > >>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                              > > >>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                              > > >>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> bryan kring
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>>
                              > > >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                              > > >>> wrote:
                              > > >>>> Hi Bryan
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                              > > >>>> print better.
                              > > >>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                              > > >>>> about the relief material.
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                              > > >>>> How large is large?
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                              > > >>>> makes all the difference!
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>> P
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                              > > >>>> Exquisite letterpress takes timeT
                              > > >>>> http://slowprint.com/
                              > > >>>> tweet: @slowprint
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                              > > >>>> Communication Strategy
                              > > >>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                              > > >>>>
                              > > >>>>> Hello,
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                              > > >>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                              > > >>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                              > > >>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                              > > >>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                              > > >>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                              > > >>>>> the plates.
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>> thanks,
                              > > >>>>> bryan
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>> ------------------------------------
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>>>>
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >> ------------------------------------
                              > > >>
                              > > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >>
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > ------------------------------------
                              > > >
                              > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > ------------------------------------
                              > >
                              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                              > >
                              >
                            • David McNamara
                              Gerald, I ve only done fairly short runs, so I ve just taken a good pinch at a time and placed it on the feeding board. (Since the fridge is small and needs no
                              Message 14 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Gerald,
                                 
                                I've only done fairly short runs, so I've just taken a good pinch at a time and placed it on the feeding board. (Since the fridge is small and needs no outlet, it's easily positioned not-too-far from the press.) So for the longer/bigger runs and commercial work, I'll defer to those with more experience--I'm firmly in the hobby category when it comes to paper dampening.
                                __

                                David
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:40 PM
                                Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block

                                 

                                Hi David

                                Looks like we are having a night. Okay, let me rephrase this. Are you pulling from a humidor or bag? or is the paper just stacked up, naked as a jaybird in the prevailing winds? If so, is there a noticeable difference in the hydration from beginning to end? I guess this is a puzzlement to me because someone once proclaimed they were able to print dampened paper on a Heidelberg and I'm thinking what!?! I thought Wm Everson must be turning in his grave!!!

                                Gerald

                                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Gerald,
                                >
                                > I didn't suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might benefit.
                                >
                                > As for feeding, except for fairly light stock, I've never had a problem with it. It handles largely like un-dampened paper. In fact, if anything, I think there's a little more grip and easier sheet separation. Anything 70#t or higher is stiff enough to stand like a regular sheet (except maybe for larger sheets). If the paper is too flimsy at that weight, I'd propose it's probably too damp...
                                > __
                                >
                                > David
                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                > From: Gerald Lange
                                > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                > Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:15 PM
                                > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Hi David
                                >
                                > Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.
                                >
                                > Gerald
                                >
                                > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > The way I've done it is:
                                > >
                                > > I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                                > > you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                                > > got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                                > > cheap Tupperware).
                                > >
                                > > Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                                > > they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                                > > doors of the mini-fridge.
                                > >
                                > > Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                                > > the shelving from marking the paper.
                                > >
                                > > Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                                > > impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                                > > mold.)
                                > >
                                > > (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                                > > fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                                > > from the paper.)
                                > >
                                > > (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                                > > overkill.)
                                > >
                                > > Hope that helps.
                                > > __
                                > >
                                > > David
                                > > ----- Original Message -----
                                > > From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@>
                                > > To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                                > > Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                                > > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > Hi Scott
                                > >
                                > > I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                                > > is always, I did and it worked out great.
                                > >
                                > > Gerald
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                                > > > Gerald,
                                > > >
                                > > > This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                                > > > C&P a few days ago.
                                > > >
                                > > > What is supposed to go wrong?
                                > > >
                                > > > --Scott
                                > > >
                                > > > On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > >> Bryan
                                > > >>
                                > > >> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                                > > >>
                                > > >> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                                > > >> and often benefits by not being the same.
                                > > >>
                                > > >> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                                > > >> linocut, hands down.
                                > > >>
                                > > >> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                                > > >> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                                > > >>
                                > > >> Gerald
                                > > >> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                                > > >>
                                > > >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                                > > >>> Thanks,
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                                > > >>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                                > > >>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                                > > >>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> As a separate question:
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                                > > >>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                                > > >>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                                > > >>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                                > > >>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                                > > >>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                                > > >>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                                > > >>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                                > > >>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                                > > >>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                                > > >>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                                > > >>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> bryan kring
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>>
                                > > >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                                > > >>> wrote:
                                > > >>>> Hi Bryan
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                                > > >>>> print better.
                                > > >>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                                > > >>>> about the relief material.
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                                > > >>>> How large is large?
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                                > > >>>> makes all the difference!
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>> P
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                                > > >>>> Exquisite letterpress takes timeT
                                > > >>>> http://slowprint.com/
                                > > >>>> tweet: @slowprint
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                > > >>>> Communication Strategy
                                > > >>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                                > > >>>>
                                > > >>>>> Hello,
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                                > > >>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                                > > >>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                                > > >>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                                > > >>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                                > > >>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                                > > >>>>> the plates.
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>> thanks,
                                > > >>>>> bryan
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>> ------------------------------------
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>>>>
                                > > >>
                                > > >>
                                > > >>
                                > > >> ------------------------------------
                                > > >>
                                > > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                > > >>
                                > > >>
                                > > >>
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > ------------------------------------
                                > > >
                                > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > ------------------------------------
                                > >
                                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                > >
                                >

                              • Scott Rubel
                                It s called Khadi paper C5. 100% cotton rag. I wouldn t say the situation was ideal, and the paper buckled a bit with the moisture, but that added to the sort
                                Message 15 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  It's called Khadi paper C5. 100% cotton rag. I wouldn't say the
                                  situation was ideal, and the paper buckled a bit with the moisture,
                                  but that added to the sort of look the customer wanted anyway.
                                  Printing it dry was barely holding an impression, even when I had so
                                  much pressure the little press wouldn't cycle through. I could have
                                  reset up on a larger press and probably done it, but with only 100 to
                                  do, this seemed fast and a little fun.

                                  http://www.khadi.com

                                  --Scott


                                  On Sep 19, 2011, at 8:31 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                                  > Hi Scott
                                  >
                                  > Email certainly sucks as a communication method, huh?
                                  >
                                  > What was the paper? I've generally found that sized paper does not
                                  > work at all for dampening. I guess I am thinking of externally
                                  > sized watercolor papers. Stonehenge comes to mind. Total piece of
                                  > crap if dampened, but give it a good whack when dry, all is good!!!!
                                  >
                                  > Gerald
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@...> wrote:
                                  >>
                                  >> Sorry about that. I thought there was something about the C&P that
                                  >> made this difficult.
                                  >>
                                  >> How I've done it in the old days is to spritz every other sheet or
                                  >> two
                                  >> of paper and stack it all. After a fairly short while all sheets are
                                  >> about the same softness or moisture.
                                  >>
                                  >> You can tell I'm not a scientist, but since I do mostly commercial
                                  >> work I really don't want to dampen any paper at all because I'm in a
                                  >> hurry. The other day I had to do it in a hurry. I was printing on an
                                  >> unfamiliar deckled sheet that had so much gelatin in it that it would
                                  >> not make much of an impression. I had not planned on it or charged
                                  >> for
                                  >> it, but I ended up having to take the extra time to moisten it and I
                                  >> did it by the method mentioned above. Happy customer with no idea how
                                  >> it had to get done.
                                  >>
                                  >> --Scott
                                  >>
                                  >> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:51 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                  >>
                                  >>> Hi Scott
                                  >>>
                                  >>> I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the
                                  >>> explanation
                                  >>> is always, I did and it worked out great.
                                  >>>
                                  >>> Gerald
                                  >>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>> On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                                  >>>> Gerald,
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>> This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper
                                  >>>> on my
                                  >>>> C&P a few days ago.
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>> What is supposed to go wrong?
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>> --Scott
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>>> Bryan
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each
                                  >>>>> element,
                                  >>>>> and often benefits by not being the same.
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                                  >>>>> linocut, hands down.
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                                  >>>>> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> Gerald
                                  >>>>> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@>
                                  >>>>> wrote:
                                  >>>>>> Thanks,
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                                  >>>>>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                                  >>>>>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                                  >>>>>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> As a separate question:
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with
                                  >>>>>> tight
                                  >>>>>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                                  >>>>>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on
                                  >>>>>> this. I
                                  >>>>>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line
                                  >>>>>> art
                                  >>>>>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line
                                  >>>>>> art
                                  >>>>>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and
                                  >>>>>> the
                                  >>>>>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially
                                  >>>>>> off
                                  >>>>>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print
                                  >>>>>> this
                                  >>>>>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                                  >>>>>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on
                                  >>>>>> top of
                                  >>>>>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                                  >>>>>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> bryan kring
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>
                                  >>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                                  >>>>>> wrote:
                                  >>>>>>> Hi Bryan
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface
                                  >>>>>>> will
                                  >>>>>>> print better.
                                  >>>>>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                                  >>>>>>> about the relief material.
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                                  >>>>>>> How large is large?
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                                  >>>>>>> makes all the difference!
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>> P
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                                  >>>>>>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                                  >>>>>>> http://slowprint.com/
                                  >>>>>>> tweet: @slowprint
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                  >>>>>>> Communication Strategy
                                  >>>>>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                                  >>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>> Hello,
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print
                                  >>>>>>>> solids
                                  >>>>>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                                  >>>>>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                                  >>>>>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                                  >>>>>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                                  >>>>>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time
                                  >>>>>>>> and buy
                                  >>>>>>>> the plates.
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>> thanks,
                                  >>>>>>>> bryan
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>> ------------------------------------
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>>>>
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> ------------------------------------
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>>
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>> ------------------------------------
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>> ------------------------------------
                                  >>>
                                  >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>>
                                  >>
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ------------------------------------
                                  >
                                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • Peter Fraterdeus
                                  Hi all Mea Culpa. That would have been me that prints damp on the Heidelberg ;-) And why not? There have been a number of occasions that it s been extremely
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Hi all

                                    Mea Culpa.
                                    That would have been me that prints damp on the Heidelberg ;-)
                                    And why not?

                                    There have been a number of occasions that it's been extremely helpful, such as when the prevailing temperature is below 5 degrees (F) and no amount of room humidifier will bring the relative humidity over about 10%

                                    Works great. No problem. Lettra, or what have you. Here in three-colors on an 4x6 folded card.
                                    http://slowprint.com/2010-koch-optima-cards

                                    There's not much problem with maintaining humidity, since the stock is kept under wraps until all makeready is done, and returned to the wrapper after each lift is printed. Certainly I wouldn't want to process 1000s of pieces like this, but for 500 or 1000, not a problem.

                                    I just printed a 13x20 broadsheet on the Vandercook 219 (an unusual job here).
                                    There's a bold 96 point cap headline at the top of the piece which was not going to give sufficient coverage without overloading it with ink, so I stopped after a dozen sheets, and dampened the rest.

                                    My method, which is modified from Lewis Allen's and works well for heavier stock (it may be fine for light book papers, but I haven't done much book printing)

                                    Standing Press
                                    Large Black Garbage Bag
                                    |
                                    | Exterior Plywood
                                    | Blotter
                                    | Blotter
                                    | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                    | ....
                                    | {continue to complete stack}
                                    | ...
                                    | Press stock, soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                    | Press stock dry
                                    | Press stock dry (4 - 6 or so sheets depending on weight)
                                    | Press stock dry
                                    | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                    | Blotter
                                    | Blotter (larger than press stock)
                                    | Exterior Plywood sheet (larger than press stock)
                                    |
                                    Large Black Garbage Bag
                                    Standing Press

                                    Leave under moderate pressure in standing press overnight.

                                    Return next day. All is perfect.

                                    On the Vandercook I pull the press sheet from the stack under the top blotter, and stack the printed sheet back on a new stack beginning with the plywood and blotter. The big plastic bag is wrapped across the stack as needed. This maintains humidity for a couple of days no problem.

                                    I haven't had trouble with buckling. I try to keep the stack covered, and then when finished, lay the sheets out in small lifts, and rotate these a couple of times over the next day or so. Finishing off back in the standing press for some hours.

                                    P

                                    Peter Fraterdeus
                                    Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                                    http://slowprint.com/
                                    tweet: @slowprint

                                    IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                    Communication Strategy
                                    Semiotx.com @ideaswords

                                    On 19 Sep 2011, at 10:40 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:

                                    > Hi David
                                    >
                                    > Looks like we are having a night. Okay, let me rephrase this. Are you pulling from a humidor or bag? or is the paper just stacked up, naked as a jaybird in the prevailing winds? If so, is there a noticeable difference in the hydration from beginning to end? I guess this is a puzzlement to me because someone once proclaimed they were able to print dampened paper on a Heidelberg and I'm thinking what!?! I thought Wm Everson must be turning in his grave!!!
                                    >
                                    > Gerald
                                    >
                                    > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@...> wrote:
                                    >>
                                    >> Gerald,
                                    >>
                                    >> I didn't suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might benefit.
                                    >>
                                    >> As for feeding, except for fairly light stock, I've never had a problem with it. It handles largely like un-dampened paper. In fact, if anything, I think there's a little more grip and easier sheet separation. Anything 70#t or higher is stiff enough to stand like a regular sheet (except maybe for larger sheets). If the paper is too flimsy at that weight, I'd propose it's probably too damp...
                                    >> __
                                    >>
                                    >> David
                                    >> ----- Original Message -----
                                    >> From: Gerald Lange
                                    >> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                    >> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:15 PM
                                    >> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                    >>
                                    >>
                                    >>
                                    >> Hi David
                                    >>
                                    >> Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.
                                    >>
                                    >> Gerald
                                    >>
                                    >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara" <david@> wrote:
                                    >>>
                                    >>> The way I've done it is:
                                    >>>
                                    >>> I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                                    >>> you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                                    >>> got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                                    >>> cheap Tupperware).
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                                    >>> they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                                    >>> doors of the mini-fridge.
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                                    >>> the shelving from marking the paper.
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                                    >>> impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                                    >>> mold.)
                                    >>>
                                    >>> (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                                    >>> fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                                    >>> from the paper.)
                                    >>>
                                    >>> (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                                    >>> overkill.)
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Hope that helps.
                                    >>> __
                                    >>>
                                    >>> David
                                    >>> ----- Original Message -----
                                    >>> From: "Gerald Lange" <Bieler@>
                                    >>> To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                                    >>> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                                    >>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                    >>>
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Hi Scott
                                    >>>
                                    >>> I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                                    >>> is always, I did and it worked out great.
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Gerald
                                    >>>
                                    >>>
                                    >>>
                                    >>> On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                                    >>>> Gerald,
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>> This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                                    >>>> C&P a few days ago.
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>> What is supposed to go wrong?
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>> --Scott
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>>> Bryan
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                                    >>>>> and often benefits by not being the same.
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                                    >>>>> linocut, hands down.
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                                    >>>>> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> Gerald
                                    >>>>> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                                    >>>>>> Thanks,
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                                    >>>>>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                                    >>>>>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                                    >>>>>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> As a separate question:
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                                    >>>>>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                                    >>>>>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                                    >>>>>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                                    >>>>>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                                    >>>>>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                                    >>>>>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                                    >>>>>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                                    >>>>>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                                    >>>>>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                                    >>>>>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                                    >>>>>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> bryan kring
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>
                                    >>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                                    >>>>>> wrote:
                                    >>>>>>> Hi Bryan
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                                    >>>>>>> print better.
                                    >>>>>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                                    >>>>>>> about the relief material.
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                                    >>>>>>> How large is large?
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                                    >>>>>>> makes all the difference!
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>> P
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                                    >>>>>>> Exquisite letterpress takes timeT
                                    >>>>>>> http://slowprint.com/
                                    >>>>>>> tweet: @slowprint
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                    >>>>>>> Communication Strategy
                                    >>>>>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                                    >>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>> Hello,
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                                    >>>>>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                                    >>>>>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                                    >>>>>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                                    >>>>>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                                    >>>>>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                                    >>>>>>>> the plates.
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>> thanks,
                                    >>>>>>>> bryan
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>> ------------------------------------
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>>>>
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> ------------------------------------
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>>
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>> ------------------------------------
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>>
                                    >>>
                                    >>>
                                    >>>
                                    >>>
                                    >>> ------------------------------------
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >>>
                                    >>
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
                                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Gerald Lange
                                    Hi Peter This doesn t sound at all like it could be based on Lewis Allen s methodology, more like Gabriel Rummonds. ? I don t recall Lewis Allen advocating
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Sep 19, 2011
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Hi Peter

                                      This doesn't sound at all like it could be based on Lewis Allen's
                                      methodology, more like Gabriel Rummonds. ?

                                      I don't recall Lewis Allen advocating soaking paper, using garbage bags,
                                      or blotters (per se), whereas Rummonds does.

                                      Gerald


                                      On 9/19/11 9:56 PM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:
                                      > Hi all
                                      >
                                      > Mea Culpa.
                                      > That would have been me that prints damp on the Heidelberg ;-)
                                      > And why not?
                                      >
                                      > There have been a number of occasions that it's been extremely helpful, such as when the prevailing temperature is below 5 degrees (F) and no amount of room humidifier will bring the relative humidity over about 10%
                                      >
                                      > Works great. No problem. Lettra, or what have you. Here in three-colors on an 4x6 folded card.
                                      > http://slowprint.com/2010-koch-optima-cards
                                      >
                                      > There's not much problem with maintaining humidity, since the stock is kept under wraps until all makeready is done, and returned to the wrapper after each lift is printed. Certainly I wouldn't want to process 1000s of pieces like this, but for 500 or 1000, not a problem.
                                      >
                                      > I just printed a 13x20 broadsheet on the Vandercook 219 (an unusual job here).
                                      > There's a bold 96 point cap headline at the top of the piece which was not going to give sufficient coverage without overloading it with ink, so I stopped after a dozen sheets, and dampened the rest.
                                      >
                                      > My method, which is modified from Lewis Allen's and works well for heavier stock (it may be fine for light book papers, but I haven't done much book printing)
                                      >
                                      > Standing Press
                                      > Large Black Garbage Bag
                                      > |
                                      > | Exterior Plywood
                                      > | Blotter
                                      > | Blotter
                                      > | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                      > | ....
                                      > | {continue to complete stack}
                                      > | ...
                                      > | Press stock, soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                      > | Press stock dry
                                      > | Press stock dry (4 - 6 or so sheets depending on weight)
                                      > | Press stock dry
                                      > | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                      > | Blotter
                                      > | Blotter (larger than press stock)
                                      > | Exterior Plywood sheet (larger than press stock)
                                      > |
                                      > Large Black Garbage Bag
                                      > Standing Press
                                      >
                                      > Leave under moderate pressure in standing press overnight.
                                      >
                                      > Return next day. All is perfect.
                                      >
                                      > On the Vandercook I pull the press sheet from the stack under the top blotter, and stack the printed sheet back on a new stack beginning with the plywood and blotter. The big plastic bag is wrapped across the stack as needed. This maintains humidity for a couple of days no problem.
                                      >
                                      > I haven't had trouble with buckling. I try to keep the stack covered, and then when finished, lay the sheets out in small lifts, and rotate these a couple of times over the next day or so. Finishing off back in the standing press for some hours.
                                      >
                                      > P
                                      >
                                      > Peter Fraterdeus
                                      > Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                                      > http://slowprint.com/
                                      > tweet: @slowprint
                                      >
                                      > IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                      > Communication Strategy
                                      > Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                      >
                                      > On 19 Sep 2011, at 10:40 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                      >
                                      >> Hi David
                                      >>
                                      >> Looks like we are having a night. Okay, let me rephrase this. Are you pulling from a humidor or bag? or is the paper just stacked up, naked as a jaybird in the prevailing winds? If so, is there a noticeable difference in the hydration from beginning to end? I guess this is a puzzlement to me because someone once proclaimed they were able to print dampened paper on a Heidelberg and I'm thinking what!?! I thought Wm Everson must be turning in his grave!!!
                                      >>
                                      >> Gerald
                                      >>
                                      >> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara"<david@...> wrote:
                                      >>> Gerald,
                                      >>>
                                      >>> I didn't suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might benefit.
                                      >>>
                                      >>> As for feeding, except for fairly light stock, I've never had a problem with it. It handles largely like un-dampened paper. In fact, if anything, I think there's a little more grip and easier sheet separation. Anything 70#t or higher is stiff enough to stand like a regular sheet (except maybe for larger sheets). If the paper is too flimsy at that weight, I'd propose it's probably too damp...
                                      >>> __
                                      >>>
                                      >>> David
                                      >>> ----- Original Message -----
                                      >>> From: Gerald Lange
                                      >>> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                      >>> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:15 PM
                                      >>> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                      >>>
                                      >>>
                                      >>>
                                      >>> Hi David
                                      >>>
                                      >>> Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.
                                      >>>
                                      >>> Gerald
                                      >>>
                                      >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara"<david@> wrote:
                                      >>>> The way I've done it is:
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                                      >>>> you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                                      >>>> got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                                      >>>> cheap Tupperware).
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                                      >>>> they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                                      >>>> doors of the mini-fridge.
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                                      >>>> the shelving from marking the paper.
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                                      >>>> impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                                      >>>> mold.)
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                                      >>>> fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                                      >>>> from the paper.)
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                                      >>>> overkill.)
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> Hope that helps.
                                      >>>> __
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> David
                                      >>>> ----- Original Message -----
                                      >>>> From: "Gerald Lange"<Bieler@>
                                      >>>> To:<PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                                      >>>> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                                      >>>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> Hi Scott
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                                      >>>> is always, I did and it worked out great.
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> Gerald
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>>
                                      >>>> On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                                      >>>>> Gerald,
                                      >>>>>
                                      >>>>> This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                                      >>>>> C&P a few days ago.
                                      >>>>>
                                      >>>>> What is supposed to go wrong?
                                      >>>>>
                                      >>>>> --Scott
                                      >>>>>
                                      >>>>> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                      >>>>>
                                      >>>>>> Bryan
                                      >>>>>>
                                      >>>>>> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                                      >>>>>>
                                      >>>>>> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                                      >>>>>> and often benefits by not being the same.
                                      >>>>>>
                                      >>>>>> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                                      >>>>>> linocut, hands down.
                                      >>>>>>
                                      >>>>>> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                                      >>>>>> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                                      >>>>>>
                                      >>>>>> Gerald
                                      >>>>>> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                                      >>>>>>
                                      >>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                                      >>>>>>> Thanks,
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                                      >>>>>>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                                      >>>>>>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                                      >>>>>>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> As a separate question:
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                                      >>>>>>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                                      >>>>>>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                                      >>>>>>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                                      >>>>>>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                                      >>>>>>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                                      >>>>>>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                                      >>>>>>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                                      >>>>>>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                                      >>>>>>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                                      >>>>>>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                                      >>>>>>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> bryan kring
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                                      >>>>>>> wrote:
                                      >>>>>>>> Hi Bryan
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                                      >>>>>>>> print better.
                                      >>>>>>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                                      >>>>>>>> about the relief material.
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                                      >>>>>>>> How large is large?
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                                      >>>>>>>> makes all the difference!
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>> P
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                                      >>>>>>>> Exquisite letterpress takes timeT
                                      >>>>>>>> http://slowprint.com/
                                      >>>>>>>> tweet: @slowprint
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                      >>>>>>>> Communication Strategy
                                      >>>>>>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                                      >>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>>> Hello,
                                      >>>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                                      >>>>>>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                                      >>>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                                      >>>>>>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                                      >>>>>>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                                      >>>>>>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                                      >>>>>>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                                      >>>>>>>>> the plates.
                                      >>>>>>>>>
                                      >>>>>>>>> thanks,
                                      >>>>>>>>> bryan
                                    • Peter Fraterdeus
                                      Hmm. I ve never read Rummonds, must have absorbed this method along the way... I did read Allen in the 1980s, and at one time had built a humidor as he
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Sep 20, 2011
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        Hmm. I've never read Rummonds, must have absorbed this method along the way...

                                        I did read Allen in the 1980s, and at one time had built a humidor as he describes. Perhaps (probably) I'm conflating my sources.

                                        The blotter mostly serves to keep the plywood texture from impressing on the stock...

                                        Thanks for the correction!

                                        •=^=•=^=•=^=•=^=•=^=•=^=
                                        Peter Fraterdeus
                                        Slowprint.com
                                        Semiotx.com

                                        On Sep 20, 2011, at 1:46 AM, Gerald Lange <Bieler@...> wrote:

                                        > Hi Peter
                                        >
                                        > This doesn't sound at all like it could be based on Lewis Allen's
                                        > methodology, more like Gabriel Rummonds. ?
                                        >
                                        > I don't recall Lewis Allen advocating soaking paper, using garbage bags,
                                        > or blotters (per se), whereas Rummonds does.
                                        >
                                        > Gerald
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > On 9/19/11 9:56 PM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:
                                        >> Hi all
                                        >>
                                        >> Mea Culpa.
                                        >> That would have been me that prints damp on the Heidelberg ;-)
                                        >> And why not?
                                        >>
                                        >> There have been a number of occasions that it's been extremely helpful, such as when the prevailing temperature is below 5 degrees (F) and no amount of room humidifier will bring the relative humidity over about 10%
                                        >>
                                        >> Works great. No problem. Lettra, or what have you. Here in three-colors on an 4x6 folded card.
                                        >> http://slowprint.com/2010-koch-optima-cards
                                        >>
                                        >> There's not much problem with maintaining humidity, since the stock is kept under wraps until all makeready is done, and returned to the wrapper after each lift is printed. Certainly I wouldn't want to process 1000s of pieces like this, but for 500 or 1000, not a problem.
                                        >>
                                        >> I just printed a 13x20 broadsheet on the Vandercook 219 (an unusual job here).
                                        >> There's a bold 96 point cap headline at the top of the piece which was not going to give sufficient coverage without overloading it with ink, so I stopped after a dozen sheets, and dampened the rest.
                                        >>
                                        >> My method, which is modified from Lewis Allen's and works well for heavier stock (it may be fine for light book papers, but I haven't done much book printing)
                                        >>
                                        >> Standing Press
                                        >> Large Black Garbage Bag
                                        >> |
                                        >> | Exterior Plywood
                                        >> | Blotter
                                        >> | Blotter
                                        >> | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                        >> | ....
                                        >> | {continue to complete stack}
                                        >> | ...
                                        >> | Press stock, soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                        >> | Press stock dry
                                        >> | Press stock dry (4 - 6 or so sheets depending on weight)
                                        >> | Press stock dry
                                        >> | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                        >> | Blotter
                                        >> | Blotter (larger than press stock)
                                        >> | Exterior Plywood sheet (larger than press stock)
                                        >> |
                                        >> Large Black Garbage Bag
                                        >> Standing Press
                                        >>
                                        >> Leave under moderate pressure in standing press overnight.
                                        >>
                                        >> Return next day. All is perfect.
                                        >>
                                        >> On the Vandercook I pull the press sheet from the stack under the top blotter, and stack the printed sheet back on a new stack beginning with the plywood and blotter. The big plastic bag is wrapped across the stack as needed. This maintains humidity for a couple of days no problem.
                                        >>
                                        >> I haven't had trouble with buckling. I try to keep the stack covered, and then when finished, lay the sheets out in small lifts, and rotate these a couple of times over the next day or so. Finishing off back in the standing press for some hours.
                                        >>
                                        >> P
                                        >>
                                        >> Peter Fraterdeus
                                        >> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                                        >> http://slowprint.com/
                                        >> tweet: @slowprint
                                        >>
                                        >> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                        >> Communication Strategy
                                        >> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                        >>
                                        >> On 19 Sep 2011, at 10:40 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                        >>
                                        >>> Hi David
                                        >>>
                                        >>> Looks like we are having a night. Okay, let me rephrase this. Are you pulling from a humidor or bag? or is the paper just stacked up, naked as a jaybird in the prevailing winds? If so, is there a noticeable difference in the hydration from beginning to end? I guess this is a puzzlement to me because someone once proclaimed they were able to print dampened paper on a Heidelberg and I'm thinking what!?! I thought Wm Everson must be turning in his grave!!!
                                        >>>
                                        >>> Gerald
                                        >>>
                                        >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara"<david@...> wrote:
                                        >>>> Gerald,
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>> I didn't suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might benefit.
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>> As for feeding, except for fairly light stock, I've never had a problem with it. It handles largely like un-dampened paper. In fact, if anything, I think there's a little more grip and easier sheet separation. Anything 70#t or higher is stiff enough to stand like a regular sheet (except maybe for larger sheets). If the paper is too flimsy at that weight, I'd propose it's probably too damp...
                                        >>>> __
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>> David
                                        >>>> ----- Original Message -----
                                        >>>> From: Gerald Lange
                                        >>>> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                        >>>> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:15 PM
                                        >>>> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>> Hi David
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>> Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>> Gerald
                                        >>>>
                                        >>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara"<david@> wrote:
                                        >>>>> The way I've done it is:
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                                        >>>>> you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                                        >>>>> got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                                        >>>>> cheap Tupperware).
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                                        >>>>> they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                                        >>>>> doors of the mini-fridge.
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                                        >>>>> the shelving from marking the paper.
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                                        >>>>> impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                                        >>>>> mold.)
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                                        >>>>> fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                                        >>>>> from the paper.)
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                                        >>>>> overkill.)
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> Hope that helps.
                                        >>>>> __
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> David
                                        >>>>> ----- Original Message -----
                                        >>>>> From: "Gerald Lange"<Bieler@>
                                        >>>>> To:<PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                                        >>>>> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                                        >>>>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> Hi Scott
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                                        >>>>> is always, I did and it worked out great.
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> Gerald
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>>
                                        >>>>> On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                                        >>>>>> Gerald,
                                        >>>>>>
                                        >>>>>> This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                                        >>>>>> C&P a few days ago.
                                        >>>>>>
                                        >>>>>> What is supposed to go wrong?
                                        >>>>>>
                                        >>>>>> --Scott
                                        >>>>>>
                                        >>>>>> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                        >>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>> Bryan
                                        >>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                                        >>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                                        >>>>>>> and often benefits by not being the same.
                                        >>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                                        >>>>>>> linocut, hands down.
                                        >>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                                        >>>>>>> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                                        >>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>> Gerald
                                        >>>>>>> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                                        >>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                                        >>>>>>>> Thanks,
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                                        >>>>>>>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                                        >>>>>>>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                                        >>>>>>>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> As a separate question:
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                                        >>>>>>>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                                        >>>>>>>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                                        >>>>>>>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                                        >>>>>>>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                                        >>>>>>>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                                        >>>>>>>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                                        >>>>>>>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                                        >>>>>>>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                                        >>>>>>>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                                        >>>>>>>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                                        >>>>>>>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> bryan kring
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                                        >>>>>>>> wrote:
                                        >>>>>>>>> Hi Bryan
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                                        >>>>>>>>> print better.
                                        >>>>>>>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                                        >>>>>>>>> about the relief material.
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                                        >>>>>>>>> How large is large?
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                                        >>>>>>>>> makes all the difference!
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>> P
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                                        >>>>>>>>> Exquisite letterpress takes timeT
                                        >>>>>>>>> http://slowprint.com/
                                        >>>>>>>>> tweet: @slowprint
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                        >>>>>>>>> Communication Strategy
                                        >>>>>>>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                                        >>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>>> Hello,
                                        >>>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                                        >>>>>>>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                                        >>>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                                        >>>>>>>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                                        >>>>>>>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                                        >>>>>>>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                                        >>>>>>>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                                        >>>>>>>>>> the plates.
                                        >>>>>>>>>>
                                        >>>>>>>>>> thanks,
                                        >>>>>>>>>> bryan
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > ------------------------------------
                                        >
                                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                      • bryan kring
                                        I learned to dampen paper from info that I found in this group (which led me to Lewis Allen s book). It has worked great and now I always dampen my paper when
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Sep 20, 2011
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          I learned to dampen paper from info that I found in this group (which led me to Lewis Allen's book). It has worked great and now I always dampen my paper when printing on unsized paper.

                                          I use "dampening boxes" to hold the paper between print runs. I am able to pull out a stack of about 10-15 sheets at a time to set on the feed board. The press moves fast enough that I can feed and print the stack without any noticeable drying. I usually print on heavy printmaking papers which seem to dry fairly slowly.

                                          Bryan
                                        • Gerald Lange
                                          Hi again If you switched from wood to 3/8 inch acetate sheets you would not get the wood texture. I just start and end with three or four sheets of the stock
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Sep 20, 2011
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            Hi again

                                            If you switched from wood to 3/8 inch acetate sheets you would not get
                                            the wood texture. I just start and end with three or four sheets of the
                                            stock and let that do the absorption. I haven't had issue with buckling
                                            or cocking. At one time I was using asbestos sheeting, through the
                                            recommendation of a papermaker. It has a smooth side and absorbs and
                                            retains the dampness well. I eventually tossed these because, well, they
                                            were asbestos. The acetate seemed an adequate replacement.

                                            Gerald


                                            On 9/20/11 7:14 AM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:
                                            > Hmm. I've never read Rummonds, must have absorbed this method along the way...
                                            >
                                            > I did read Allen in the 1980s, and at one time had built a humidor as he describes. Perhaps (probably) I'm conflating my sources.
                                            >
                                            > The blotter mostly serves to keep the plywood texture from impressing on the stock...
                                            >
                                            > Thanks for the correction!
                                            >
                                            > •=^=•=^=•=^=•=^=•=^=•=^=
                                            > Peter Fraterdeus
                                            > Slowprint.com
                                            > Semiotx.com
                                            >
                                            > On Sep 20, 2011, at 1:46 AM, Gerald Lange<Bieler@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            >> Hi Peter
                                            >>
                                            >> This doesn't sound at all like it could be based on Lewis Allen's
                                            >> methodology, more like Gabriel Rummonds. ?
                                            >>
                                            >> I don't recall Lewis Allen advocating soaking paper, using garbage bags,
                                            >> or blotters (per se), whereas Rummonds does.
                                            >>
                                            >> Gerald
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                            >> On 9/19/11 9:56 PM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:
                                            >>> Hi all
                                            >>>
                                            >>> Mea Culpa.
                                            >>> That would have been me that prints damp on the Heidelberg ;-)
                                            >>> And why not?
                                            >>>
                                            >>> There have been a number of occasions that it's been extremely helpful, such as when the prevailing temperature is below 5 degrees (F) and no amount of room humidifier will bring the relative humidity over about 10%
                                            >>>
                                            >>> Works great. No problem. Lettra, or what have you. Here in three-colors on an 4x6 folded card.
                                            >>> http://slowprint.com/2010-koch-optima-cards
                                            >>>
                                            >>> There's not much problem with maintaining humidity, since the stock is kept under wraps until all makeready is done, and returned to the wrapper after each lift is printed. Certainly I wouldn't want to process 1000s of pieces like this, but for 500 or 1000, not a problem.
                                            >>>
                                            >>> I just printed a 13x20 broadsheet on the Vandercook 219 (an unusual job here).
                                            >>> There's a bold 96 point cap headline at the top of the piece which was not going to give sufficient coverage without overloading it with ink, so I stopped after a dozen sheets, and dampened the rest.
                                            >>>
                                            >>> My method, which is modified from Lewis Allen's and works well for heavier stock (it may be fine for light book papers, but I haven't done much book printing)
                                            >>>
                                            >>> Standing Press
                                            >>> Large Black Garbage Bag
                                            >>> |
                                            >>> | Exterior Plywood
                                            >>> | Blotter
                                            >>> | Blotter
                                            >>> | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                            >>> | ....
                                            >>> | {continue to complete stack}
                                            >>> | ...
                                            >>> | Press stock, soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                            >>> | Press stock dry
                                            >>> | Press stock dry (4 - 6 or so sheets depending on weight)
                                            >>> | Press stock dry
                                            >>> | Press stock soaked in water, by immersion in a large photo tray.
                                            >>> | Blotter
                                            >>> | Blotter (larger than press stock)
                                            >>> | Exterior Plywood sheet (larger than press stock)
                                            >>> |
                                            >>> Large Black Garbage Bag
                                            >>> Standing Press
                                            >>>
                                            >>> Leave under moderate pressure in standing press overnight.
                                            >>>
                                            >>> Return next day. All is perfect.
                                            >>>
                                            >>> On the Vandercook I pull the press sheet from the stack under the top blotter, and stack the printed sheet back on a new stack beginning with the plywood and blotter. The big plastic bag is wrapped across the stack as needed. This maintains humidity for a couple of days no problem.
                                            >>>
                                            >>> I haven't had trouble with buckling. I try to keep the stack covered, and then when finished, lay the sheets out in small lifts, and rotate these a couple of times over the next day or so. Finishing off back in the standing press for some hours.
                                            >>>
                                            >>> P
                                            >>>
                                            >>> Peter Fraterdeus
                                            >>> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
                                            >>> http://slowprint.com/
                                            >>> tweet: @slowprint
                                            >>>
                                            >>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                            >>> Communication Strategy
                                            >>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                            >>>
                                            >>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 10:40 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                            >>>
                                            >>>> Hi David
                                            >>>>
                                            >>>> Looks like we are having a night. Okay, let me rephrase this. Are you pulling from a humidor or bag? or is the paper just stacked up, naked as a jaybird in the prevailing winds? If so, is there a noticeable difference in the hydration from beginning to end? I guess this is a puzzlement to me because someone once proclaimed they were able to print dampened paper on a Heidelberg and I'm thinking what!?! I thought Wm Everson must be turning in his grave!!!
                                            >>>>
                                            >>>> Gerald
                                            >>>>
                                            >>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara"<david@...> wrote:
                                            >>>>> Gerald,
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>> I didn't suspect that you needed a primer on paper dampening, ha. So I guess I too quickly jumped to explaining a simple setup for those who might benefit.
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>> As for feeding, except for fairly light stock, I've never had a problem with it. It handles largely like un-dampened paper. In fact, if anything, I think there's a little more grip and easier sheet separation. Anything 70#t or higher is stiff enough to stand like a regular sheet (except maybe for larger sheets). If the paper is too flimsy at that weight, I'd propose it's probably too damp...
                                            >>>>> __
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>> David
                                            >>>>> ----- Original Message -----
                                            >>>>> From: Gerald Lange
                                            >>>>> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                                            >>>>> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 11:15 PM
                                            >>>>> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>> Hi David
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>> Thanks for your explanation. Yes, there are many ways of successfully preparing the paper. I guess I should clarify my question. My query is how is the paper kept at statis (hydration control) while printing on an press that is motor driven? I guess as opposed to a hand press or Vandercook where there is more the luxury of operator timing.
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>> Gerald
                                            >>>>>
                                            >>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "David McNamara"<david@> wrote:
                                            >>>>>> The way I've done it is:
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> I have an old mini-fridge. I got some of those green foam-ish blocks that
                                            >>>>>> you can get from craft stores that florists use for arrangements. And then I
                                            >>>>>> got some of those disposable food storage bins (by Glad and the like; think
                                            >>>>>> cheap Tupperware).
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> Fill the bins with water, soak the green stuff (cut to fit) in it until
                                            >>>>>> they're saturated. Empty the excess water. Stick about four of these in the
                                            >>>>>> doors of the mini-fridge.
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> Load the paper into the mini-fridge, ideally on something that will prevent
                                            >>>>>> the shelving from marking the paper.
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> Close the door. Wait two or three days. Paper is perfectly damp for
                                            >>>>>> impression. (You're safe up until six or seven days, at what point you risk
                                            >>>>>> mold.)
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> (And you can use any air-tight container, I suppose. I find that the old
                                            >>>>>> fridge offers plenty of space and keeps the moisture-providing foam away
                                            >>>>>> from the paper.)
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> (I also bought an inexpensive digital hygrometer, but that's pretty much
                                            >>>>>> overkill.)
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> Hope that helps.
                                            >>>>>> __
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> David
                                            >>>>>> ----- Original Message -----
                                            >>>>>> From: "Gerald Lange"<Bieler@>
                                            >>>>>> To:<PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                                            >>>>>> Sent: Monday, September 19, 2011 10:51 PM
                                            >>>>>> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Photopolymer versus linoleum block
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> Hi Scott
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> I'm asking how it is done. Doesn't do anyone any good if the explanation
                                            >>>>>> is always, I did and it worked out great.
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> Gerald
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>
                                            >>>>>> On 9/19/11 7:45 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                                            >>>>>>> Gerald,
                                            >>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>> This may be my ignorance, but I just printed on dampened paper on my
                                            >>>>>>> C&P a few days ago.
                                            >>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>> What is supposed to go wrong?
                                            >>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>> --Scott
                                            >>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>> On Sep 19, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Gerald Lange wrote:
                                            >>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>> Bryan
                                            >>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>> I think you are correct about the separate question.
                                            >>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>> Note that impression does NOT have to be the same for each element,
                                            >>>>>>>> and often benefits by not being the same.
                                            >>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>> I do know that photopolymer will give you a better solid than a
                                            >>>>>>>> linocut, hands down.
                                            >>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>> What I don't know is how one manages to print dampened paper on a
                                            >>>>>>>> C&P. So enlighten me on this. Honest question.
                                            >>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>> Gerald
                                            >>>>>>>> http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                                            >>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bryan kring"<bryan@> wrote:
                                            >>>>>>>>> Thanks,
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> My press is a platen, a 10x15 C&P.
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> The largest shape is about 5"x5". In a separate color, there are
                                            >>>>>>>>> several 1"x1" shapes that will print on top of the larger solid.
                                            >>>>>>>>> line art will print over all of the solids.
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> The paper will be heavyweight (285 gsm) printmaking paper and I
                                            >>>>>>>>> plan on dampening it before printing.
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> As a separate question:
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> In the past, my designs have usually been detailed work with tight
                                            >>>>>>>>> registration. I am trying to learn to use more overprinting. I
                                            >>>>>>>>> searched the web but didn't see any good sources of info on this. I
                                            >>>>>>>>> would be interested in reading about overprinting text or line art
                                            >>>>>>>>> on top of solids. For example, the difference in printing line art
                                            >>>>>>>>> on top of a printed solid versus printing onto blank paper and the
                                            >>>>>>>>> challenges of printing text or line partially on and partially off
                                            >>>>>>>>> of a solid shape. I think I will learn a lot as I try to print this
                                            >>>>>>>>> project. My initial assumption is to print the solid shapes first
                                            >>>>>>>>> with a light impression so that when I print the line art on top of
                                            >>>>>>>>> it I have some cushion to press into.
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> Any other advice or links to more info or good examples on
                                            >>>>>>>>> overprinting would be very much appreciated.
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> bryan kring
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Peter Fraterdeus<peterf@>
                                            >>>>>>>>> wrote:
                                            >>>>>>>>>> Hi Bryan
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>> Are you working on a cylinder press or platen?
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>> I'm not sure if there's a lot of difference in which surface will
                                            >>>>>>>>>> print better.
                                            >>>>>>>>>> Certainly it's as much about the press, the ink and the paper as
                                            >>>>>>>>>> about the relief material.
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>>>> a few areas of large simple solid shapes
                                            >>>>>>>>>> How large is large?
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>> If you're doing really substantial areas, dampen the stock. It
                                            >>>>>>>>>> makes all the difference!
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>> P
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>> Peter Fraterdeus
                                            >>>>>>>>>> Exquisite letterpress takes timeT
                                            >>>>>>>>>> http://slowprint.com/
                                            >>>>>>>>>> tweet: @slowprint
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
                                            >>>>>>>>>> Communication Strategy
                                            >>>>>>>>>> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>> On 19 Sep 2011, at 5:08 PM, bryan kring wrote:
                                            >>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> Hello,
                                            >>>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on which material would print solids
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> better, linoleum block or photopolymer?
                                            >>>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> I have some artwork that I am preparing to send out for
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> processing into photopolymer. The artwork has a few areas of
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> large simple solid shapes. If linoleum would get better ink
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> transfer then I would try it. If they are the same or if
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> photopolymer is better then I would save the carving time and buy
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> the plates.
                                            >>>>>>>>>>>
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> thanks,
                                            >>>>>>>>>>> bryan
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                            >> ------------------------------------
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                          • Gerald Lange
                                            Bryan This makes sense. My experience has been that the amount of time that the paper is out of the box can be treacherous, so my concern was how is this
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Sep 20, 2011
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Bryan

                                              This makes sense.

                                              My experience has been that the amount of time that the paper is out of
                                              the box can be treacherous, so my concern was how is this managed on a
                                              motor driven press. I have a student who wants to learn the process and
                                              she has a C&P. I wasn't sure how this would work.

                                              Thanks.

                                              Gerald


                                              On 9/20/11 8:12 AM, bryan kring wrote:
                                              > I learned to dampen paper from info that I found in this group (which led me to Lewis Allen's book). It has worked great and now I always dampen my paper when printing on unsized paper.
                                              >
                                              > I use "dampening boxes" to hold the paper between print runs. I am able to pull out a stack of about 10-15 sheets at a time to set on the feed board. The press moves fast enough that I can feed and print the stack without any noticeable drying. I usually print on heavy printmaking papers which seem to dry fairly slowly.
                                              >
                                              > Bryan
                                              >
                                              >
                                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.