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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Need a new solvent ASAP!

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  • Amber Ellis-Seguine
    Kim, I would never assuming anything based on a label. I wasn t saying it is all natural and safe I was just stating what was on the label. I did a bit of
    Message 1 of 41 , Jul 8, 2011
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      Kim, 
      I would never assuming anything based on a label. I wasn't saying it is all natural and safe I was just stating what was on the label. I did a bit of research on solvents, as I was having bloody noses and sore throats from the solvent I was using. You literally only use drops of this and so far it works well for me. I know that a lot of printers are using this solvent as it was discussed on Ladies of Letterpress last year. The printers using it seemed to like it so I did a little research and gave it a whirl. Here is the link if anyone wants more info: 


      And here is what the company says:

      About Eco-House Fine Art Supplies
      Traditional Natural Ingredients are less of a Health Risk

      Traditionally fine oil painting mediums were made strictly from natural ingredients. They are not harmless by nature, but we know them long enough to distinguish the harmless from the dangerous materials. Typical health-hazards in traditional painting mediums were overly aggressive solvents and highly toxic heavy metals in driers and pigments.

      Many of the traditional preparations and techniques have provided such excellent results and archival quality, that they are worthwhile to be developed further by eliminating or notably reducing the hazards.

      In our view, the ideal safety standards for art materials should be similar to those in the food industry, i.e. new ingredients are to be considered unsafe until their long-term health safety and archival quality are proven safe. Traditional painting mediums have passed these century-old tests.

      Many of the water-thinable oil paints contain artificial surfactants with unknown long-term properties on the artist's health and the archival quality of a painting. Many of these ingredients may have a low accute toxicity, but can accumulate in the body after entering via skin absorption instead of inhalation, which makes them less detectable as a health problem.

      The Difference is your Well - Being

      For an artist, who is exposed to the effects of manufactured art materials every day, it is very important to know what their ingredients are. Therefore .... ECO-HOUSE Inc. provides a full declaration of all ingredients on every product label










      Sent from my iPhone

      On Jul 8, 2011, at 8:34 AM, "painted_tongue" <paintedtongue@...> wrote:

       

      Hemlock is all natural too. Doesn't mean it won't kill you. Not sayin' orange 915 will ... I don't know the specifics about it, but traditional turpentine is just distilled resin from trees so it's not based in anything too far flung, yet I believe it does carry health risks. So I wouldn't recommend assuming that because something is "natural" that it isn't harmful.

      We clean our Vandercook with Crisco (applied to the rollers as if you're inking the press) Once the Crisco has loosened up the ink and most of it has been removed, we use isopropyl alcohol, firm pressure and clean white rags to remove any residue from the rollers, as well as residual traces of ink/pigment that might mess with the next color. Does the isopropyl kill the rollers? I don't notice them wearing out sooner than I expect them too, but even if it does shorten their lifespan a bit, having new rubber on the rollers is not too big of deal, but dealing with health risks are. My husband has a phd in biochemistry and swears up and down that the isopropyl is safe to touch and its vapors are not harmful.

      Even so, we do wear gloves while cleaning, preferably nitrile. Reason? a) to protect against anything harmful that might be in the ink and b) because who wants to try to keep their beautiful letterpress papers and projects clean when they're getting their hands covered in ink? Yes, inky hands are part of the game to some extent, but so is careful control of your environment in order to make a high quality product. Why make it harder by gooking your hands with ink needlessly? If you don't like the thick gloves, surgical nitrile gloves are available in all sizes, and they don't mess with your sense of touch very much if you get them in your size. Nitrile blocks something like 98% of chemical exposure. Note that latex blocks something more like 10%. Nitrile is more resistant to punctures and tears and people with latex allergies tend not to react to it. They are good to wear while typesetting, too, as handling the lead, particularly lead with any corrosion on it, is harmful to touch. Not that old typesetters seem to have suffered terribly or anything, but so they say these days . . .

      There's my two cents, for whatever they're worth ;o)

      Kim Vanderheiden
      Painted Tongue Press

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Amber Ellis-Seguine <amber@...> wrote:
      >
      > I just started using Eco house orange 915 ( I think that's the full name). It's a natural turpentine. It's expensive in comparison to most solvents but it smells good, you only need a little, and it says it's all natural. You can find it at Dick Blick.
      >
      > Good luck,
      > Amber
      >
      > Sent from my iPhone
      >
      > On Jul 7, 2011, at 7:59 PM, Ed Inman <edinman@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Wear chemical resistant gloves--or alternately 1-use (throw-away) vinyl or latex gloves. Mineral spirits is actually pretty mild as solvents go, but you want to avoid skin contact to almost any solvent.--Ed
      > >
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: David McNamara
      > > Sent: Jul 7, 2011 9:17 PM
      > > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Need a new solvent ASAP!
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > How about vegetable oil, if you're using oil-based inks?
      > > __
      > >
      > > David
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: keetgi
      > > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 9:36 PM
      > > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Need a new solvent ASAP!
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi! I just came back from the dermatologist and apparently I am having an allergic reaction to the odourless mineral spirits I've been using to clean my press.
      > >
      > > Can anyone recommend a non-toxic solution that won't rust out my press (Vandercook sp20)?
      > >
      > > I would appreciate any help or advice.
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > >
      > > Keetgi
      > > keetgi.kogan@...
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >

    • matthew lamoureux
      Well you know how it goes with products imported from Chna. . . . ;)
      Message 41 of 41 , Aug 20, 2011
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        Well you know how it goes with products imported from Chna. . . . ;)


        From: Gerald Lange <Bieler@...>;
        To: <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>;
        Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Need a new solvent ASAP!
        Sent: Sat, Aug 20, 2011 7:47:39 AM

         

        There seem to be a number of these off brand "green" solvents slipping past the censors. No ingredients listing, no MSDS supplied. Available in stores and on line. Very strange considering the strict regulations imposed on known manufacturers.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, sylvia chevrier <sylviachevrier@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dan,
        >
        > I checked on the bottle I have and there is no ingredient list. There
        > is an 800 number to call for "technical assistance". Early next week
        > when I have some free time I'm going to call, because now I'm
        > curious. I'll let you know if I find out anything worthwhile.
        >
        > Whatever is in it, this product has really made clean up alot easier for me.
        >
        > Sylvia
        >
        > >
        > >I contacted Christine's Graphic Supplies to ask about Genie's Safe N
        > >Easy and obtain it's MSDS. Don't know what I was expecting since it
        > >claims to have no harsh toxins there was nothing listed on the sheet
        > >regarding "ingredients". I was just curious what it's made of. I was
        > >also told it's "super concentrated". Now like with California Wash,
        > >which some people use out of the can but is recommended to be mixed
        > >with water...why is that not a bad idea? Wouldn't I want to keep
        > >water-soluble solvents away from a press? Though I guess if applied
        > >carefully it only should touch the rollers...
        > >
        > >Dan Selzer
        > >
        > >
        >

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