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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: DTP Software

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  • erik spiekermann
    ... i do not remember much from Latin at school, but here s my offer of a translation: While we talk, envious time runs out. Pluck the day! Believe in the
    Message 1 of 16 , Jun 9, 2011
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      On 09.06.2011, at 15:39, Silber MaiKätzchen wrote:

      > Dum loquimur, fugerit invida Aetas:
      > Carpe diem!
      > quam minimum credula postero!

      i do not remember much from Latin at school, but here's my offer of a translation:
      While we talk, envious time runs out.
      Pluck the day!
      Believe in the future as little as possible.

      Carpe Diem (Immanuel Kant’s motto) is often translated as Seize the day.

      e


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    • Silber MaiKätzchen
      Good! You are a good student. Now for a 4.0, what was the context of this statement? Turn in your Blue-Book to my assistant at the door. MaiKätzchen Dum
      Message 2 of 16 , Jun 10, 2011
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        Good! You are a good student. Now for a 4.0, what was
        the context of this statement?

        Turn in your Blue-Book to my assistant at the door.

        MaiKätzchen
         
        Dum loquimur, fugerit invida Aetas:
        Carpe diem!
        quam minimum credula postero!

        Horace
        Odes Book I



        From: erik spiekermann <erik@...>
        To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, June 9, 2011 4:31:17 PM
        Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: DTP Software


        On 09.06.2011, at 15:39, Silber MaiKätzchen wrote:

        > Dum loquimur, fugerit invida Aetas:
        > Carpe diem!
        > quam minimum credula postero!

        i do not remember much from Latin at school, but here's my offer of a translation:
        While we talk, envious time runs out.
        Pluck the day!
        Believe in the future as little as possible.

        Carpe Diem (Immanuel Kant’s motto) is often translated as Seize the day.

        e


        | prof. dr. erik spiekermann
        | www.spiekermann.com

        | Niederwallstrasse 32
        | 10117 Berlin   
        | T+49.30.2064 9090
        | F+49.30.2064 9091

        | T +1.415.350 3314
        | 368 Vallejo Street
        | San Francisco, CA 94133

        | T +44 207 254 4799
        | 47 Mildmay Grove North
        | London N1 4PN

        Itinerary | Reiseplan

        | 27.05.11 – Stuttgart
        | 28.05.11 – Frankfurt
        | 05.06.11 – 09.06.11 New York
        | 10.06.11 – 12.06.11 Barcelona
        | 16.06.11 – 19.06.11 London
        | 20.06.11 – 23.06.11 Stockholm
        | 25.06.11 – 27.06.11 Köln
        | 22.07.11 – 24.07.11 Boxberg Rallye
        | 01.08.11 – 14.08.11 London
        | 25.08.11 – 28.08.11 Ruhr
        | 14.09.11 – 18.09.11 Reykjavik
        | 22.09.11 – 25.09.11 Aschau
        | 30.09.11 – 16.10.11 San Francisco





























































































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      • erik spiekermann
        ... not good. It should have been past (postero) instead of future. Just testing. e
        Message 3 of 16 , Jun 11, 2011
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          On 11.06.2011, at 00:34, Silber MaiKätzchen wrote:

          > Good!
          not good. It should have been past (postero) instead of future. Just testing.

          e
        • Ms. Judy
          I think you are now saying it translates as Believe in the past as little as possible? Makes way more sense that way, thank you!
          Message 4 of 16 , Jun 11, 2011
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            I think you are now saying it translates as
            "Believe in the past as little as possible?"
            Makes way more sense that way, thank you!

            >It should have been past (postero) instead of future. Just testing.
            > e
          • Daniel Franklin
            I can t stand it any longer! Regarding the excerpt from Horace s Ode 1.11 ... ... The correct translation/sense is trusting in the next as little as
            Message 5 of 16 , Jun 11, 2011
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              I can't stand it any longer!

              Regarding the excerpt from Horace's Ode 1.11 ...

                                               dum loquimur, fugerit invida
              aetas. carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.

              Erik S. wrote:

              not good. It should have been past (postero) instead of future. Just testing.

              And Ms. Judy wrote:

               

              I think you are now saying it translates as
              "Believe in the past as little as possible?"
              Makes way more sense that way, thank you!

              The correct translation/sense is 'trusting in the next as little as possible,' that is, '... seize the day; don't wait till tomorrow.'

              And did you know that this was a seduction poem to Horace's (perhaps imaginary) lover Leuconoe?
            • bielerpr
              I can t stand it any longer either. This is a letterpress list. Take it over to Facebook or Letpress (they like this kind of stuff). Further contributions to
              Message 6 of 16 , Jun 11, 2011
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                I can't stand it any longer either. This is a letterpress list. Take it over to Facebook or Letpress (they like this kind of stuff). Further contributions to this thread will put the contributor on moderated status. I have way too much to do all day long and then have to deal with member complaints about this thread is just a bit too much.

                Gerald
                PPL




                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Daniel Franklin <dan@...> wrote:
                >
                > I can't stand it any longer!
                >
                > Regarding the excerpt from Horace's Ode 1.11 ...
                >
                > > dum loquimur, fugerit invida
                > > aetas. carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.
                >
                > Erik S. wrote:
                >
                > > not good. It should have been past (postero) instead of future. Just
                > > testing.
                >
                > And Ms. Judy wrote:
                >
                > > I think you are now saying it translates as
                > > "Believe in the past as little as possible?"
                > > Makes way more sense that way, thank you!
                > >
                > The correct translation/sense is 'trusting in the next as little as
                > possible,' that is, '... seize the day; don't wait till tomorrow.'
                >
                > And did you know that this was a seduction poem to Horace's (perhaps
                > imaginary) lover Leuconoe?
                >
              • Daniel Franklin
                I apologize, Gerald. Since I have Letpress and PPLetterspress come into the same e-mail folder, I assumed this was a Letpress thread, and we both know that
                Message 7 of 16 , Jun 11, 2011
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                  I apologize, Gerald.

                  Since I have Letpress and PPLetterspress come into the same e-mail
                  folder, I assumed this was a Letpress thread, and we both know that some
                  of their threads dive into deep waters (to mix metaphors). I'll be more
                  careful in the future.

                  Best regards,

                  Dan
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