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Reacquired my DX-A3

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  • Aaron Wendt
    Greetings all. I purchased a brand new Anderson-Vreeland DX-A3 in 1984, and sold it in the early 90s. Now she s back home, and I m hoping to have more success
    Message 1 of 11 , May 16, 2011
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      Greetings all.

      I purchased a brand new Anderson-Vreeland DX-A3 in 1984, and sold it in the early 90s. Now she's back home, and I'm hoping to have more success with platemaking through this group and other knowledgeable sources. When I got the machine originally, there was absolutely zero documentation and the only help I got was from my salesman when he happened to come through town.

      The poor machine is in nasty shape. Green gunk all over the front, brushes are cruddy. It the green adhesive material to hold the plate material is missing. The previous owner did purchase a roll of the draw-down film. Nevertheless, I'm eager to get away from the magnesium dies we've been using for our quality letterpress jobs.

      Here's my list of questions so far:
      Should I mess with getting the original material to hold the plates?
      What am I going for on the Stouffer scale for proper exposures?
      Where is a good starting point for exposure, wash, dry and post exposure times?
      At what temperature should they dry?
      I'm set for film, as we have an imagesetter. It seems Anderson used to recommend a matte film instead of regular lith film. Seems like we used to dust the plates with a fine talcum powder before exposure. Is that right?

      Thanks in advance. I've enjoyed reading the posts since joining!
    • Eric
      ... That seems pretty basic. How can you process a plate if you can t secure it? The question is whether steel or plastic backed plates will be your primary
      Message 2 of 11 , May 17, 2011
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        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Wendt <awendt@...> wrote:
        >
        > Should I mess with getting the original material to hold the plates?

        That seems pretty basic. How can you process a plate if you can't secure it? The question is whether steel or plastic backed plates will be your primary material. You can put sheet magnet on and then attach green sticky to a steel plate, allowing for both kinds of plate. Boxcar sells it all.

        > What am I going for on the Stouffer scale for proper exposures?
        > Where is a good starting point for exposure, wash, dry and post exposure times?
        > At what temperature should they dry?

        These all depend on your specific plate material. Get the spec sheet and the information will be there. Drying temp may be off specs, since heaters don't always each required temperatures, so just go longer.

        > I'm set for film, as we have an imagesetter. It seems Anderson used to recommend a matte film instead of regular lith film. Seems like we used to dust the plates with a fine talcum powder before exposure. Is that right?

        A few plates are made with matte surface, so matte film isn't needed with them, and some imagesetter film is effectively semi-matte. But in my experience careful rubdown of the krene gives you a good drawdown whatever film and plate are. If it were a glass-faced contact frame then matte would be necessary.
        --Eric Holub, SF
      • bielerpr
        Aaron Eric has provided very good advice here. I have not previously seen an explanation of the matte considerations, but they are correct. Talcum powder? It
        Message 3 of 11 , May 18, 2011
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          Aaron

          Eric has provided very good advice here. I have not previously seen an explanation of the matte considerations, but they are correct. Talcum powder? It is a daily battle to keep these machines clean of particulate matter, why deliberately introduce it?

          Gerald
          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <Megalonyx@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Wendt <awendt@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Should I mess with getting the original material to hold the plates?
          >
          > That seems pretty basic. How can you process a plate if you can't secure it? The question is whether steel or plastic backed plates will be your primary material. You can put sheet magnet on and then attach green sticky to a steel plate, allowing for both kinds of plate. Boxcar sells it all.
          >
          > > What am I going for on the Stouffer scale for proper exposures?
          > > Where is a good starting point for exposure, wash, dry and post exposure times?
          > > At what temperature should they dry?
          >
          > These all depend on your specific plate material. Get the spec sheet and the information will be there. Drying temp may be off specs, since heaters don't always each required temperatures, so just go longer.
          >
          > > I'm set for film, as we have an imagesetter. It seems Anderson used to recommend a matte film instead of regular lith film. Seems like we used to dust the plates with a fine talcum powder before exposure. Is that right?
          >
          > A few plates are made with matte surface, so matte film isn't needed with them, and some imagesetter film is effectively semi-matte. But in my experience careful rubdown of the krene gives you a good drawdown whatever film and plate are. If it were a glass-faced contact frame then matte would be necessary.
          > --Eric Holub, SF
          >
        • Aaron Wendt
          Thanks for your help, Charles, Gerald and Eric. I m still debating steel back vs. plastic back while cleaning up my machine. In unrelated news, I converted my
          Message 4 of 11 , May 19, 2011
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            Thanks for your help, Charles, Gerald and Eric. I'm still debating steel back vs. plastic back while cleaning up my machine.

            In unrelated news, I converted my Intertype to propane and she's spitting out lines of type after a long vacation.

            I appreciate you all.


          • Eric
            ... Aaron, you might find another yahoo group of interest: Specialized letterpress lists have a necessary place
            Message 5 of 11 , May 20, 2011
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              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Wendt <awendt@...> wrote:
              >
              >[...] In unrelated news, I converted my Intertype to propane and she's spitting out lines of type after a long vacation.
              >

              Aaron, you might find another yahoo group of interest:
              <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/IntertypeWorld/>

              Specialized letterpress lists have a necessary place beside the larger communities of LetPress and BriarPress, the PPLetterpress list and VanderBlog being excellent examples. Seeing a void, I am trying to start another yahoo list for a very small segment of contemporary printing, for users of Colt's Armory and related parallel-impression or heavy art platens: the Universal Platen Group at
              <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/universal_platen/>
              Universal Platen refers to the original Gally Universal Press from which all the others derive. In the world of printing before photopolymer, such presses were the most desired for any fine press printer. Many went to diecutters, but there are still a number of printers using them, and some younger printers are beginning to appreciate their potential. Any one here with an interest is welcome to join. There isn't any discussion yet, but there are some interesting links and one instruction manual in the files section of the group website.
              [note: One of the links is to a Scandinavian printing museum, and I used the browser Camino for its built-in google translation, and the translation was quite good.]
              --Eric Holub, SF
            • bielerpr
              Eric Just a tiny point. PPLetterpress is actually a larger community than Letpress and has been for a few years. I actually clean out the list on a weekly
              Message 6 of 11 , May 20, 2011
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                Eric

                Just a tiny point. PPLetterpress is actually a larger community than Letpress and has been for a few years. I actually clean out the list on a weekly basis. Letpress never does, there are not only dead email addresses on that list, there are dead folks, literally.

                Gerald
                PPL

                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <Megalonyx@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Aaron Wendt <awendt@> wrote:
                > >
                > >[...] In unrelated news, I converted my Intertype to propane and she's spitting out lines of type after a long vacation.
                > >
                >
                > Aaron, you might find another yahoo group of interest:
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/IntertypeWorld/>
                >
                > Specialized letterpress lists have a necessary place beside the larger communities of LetPress and BriarPress, the PPLetterpress list and VanderBlog being excellent examples. Seeing a void, I am trying to start another yahoo list for a very small segment of contemporary printing, for users of Colt's Armory and related parallel-impression or heavy art platens: the Universal Platen Group at
                > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/universal_platen/>
                > Universal Platen refers to the original Gally Universal Press from which all the others derive. In the world of printing before photopolymer, such presses were the most desired for any fine press printer. Many went to diecutters, but there are still a number of printers using them, and some younger printers are beginning to appreciate their potential. Any one here with an interest is welcome to join. There isn't any discussion yet, but there are some interesting links and one instruction manual in the files section of the group website.
                > [note: One of the links is to a Scandinavian printing museum, and I used the browser Camino for its built-in google translation, and the translation was quite good.]
                > --Eric Holub, SF
                >
              • bielerpr
                Respondents: Well, yes, regarding LetPress. Re: Briar Press. Briar only lists folks who have once upon a time registered. They do not otherwise keep track of
                Message 7 of 11 , May 21, 2011
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                  Respondents:

                  Well, yes, regarding LetPress. Re: Briar Press. Briar only lists folks who have once upon a time registered. They do not otherwise keep track of who is current. If LetPress (now at over 15 or 16 years old), did that they would be huge, as would PPL. Plus, you cannot remove yourself from Briar Press. Dead or Alive. You can from LetPress and PPL. That is the difference. And, of course, the Briar Press Discussion list is only a subset of Briar.

                  Still, active as the posting activity on LetPress is, no, they are in no way any longer in the majority in terms of membership. Sorry.

                  Not to say small isn't desirable. That was the initial intention of PPL, to stay focused on a small set of folks interested in high end letterpress digital typography. Things just changed in the letterpress/web world over the last decade, basically, the newer folks who were drawn to it, changed the parameters. We are what we are.

                  So, the small discussion letterpress lists that Eric is responsible for, supports, etc., yeah, these can be pertinent, important, focused.

                  Gerald
                  PPL


                  --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bielerpr" <Bieler@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Eric
                  >
                  > Just a tiny point. PPLetterpress is actually a larger community than Letpress and has been for a few years. I actually clean out the list on a weekly basis. Letpress never does, there are not only dead email addresses on that list, there are dead folks, literally.
                  >
                  > Gerald
                  > PPL
                  >
                • Eric
                  ... Right. It just that volume of activity that keeps many busy printers away from both LetPress and BriarPress, though on LetPress the percentage of off-topic
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 21, 2011
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                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "bielerpr" <Bieler@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Still, active as the posting activity on LetPress is, no, they are in no way any longer in the majority in terms of membership. Sorry.

                    Right. It just that volume of activity that keeps many busy printers away from both LetPress and BriarPress, though on LetPress the percentage of off-topic discussion is a big factor. 24 hours without a post there only happens when the server is down, and people will invariably send test posts. Not so here, and on other lists a week may pass without activity.
                    Of the two dozen Universal platen owners I know, only three are active in any of the letterpress lists I follow. (Another dozen are owned by David Rose, whose "Colt's Armory Fans & Enthusiasts" doesn't seem to be anything more than a static webpage.) Unfortunately, I don't see any other way of encouraging dialogue among the target audience.
                    -Eric Holub, SF
                  • Aaron Wendt
                    What is the best way to clean wash-out brushes that have been neglected? There are matted areas in the brushes. Anderson/Vreeland can t really recommend any
                    Message 9 of 11 , May 24, 2011
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                      What is the best way to clean wash-out brushes that have been neglected? There are matted areas in the brushes. Anderson/Vreeland can't really recommend any solvent or solution to loosen up the old polymers.

                      Thanks!

                      Aaron


                    • Gerald Lange
                      Aaron There is a short article here on brush maintenance: http://bielerpressxi.blogspot.com/2006/05/brush-maintenance-and-adjustment.html Use a heavy duty dog
                      Message 10 of 11 , May 24, 2011
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                        Aaron

                        There is a short article here on brush maintenance:

                        http://bielerpressxi.blogspot.com/2006/05/brush-maintenance-and-adjustment.html

                        Use a heavy duty dog hair brush or plate brush cleaner to comb the tufts straight. If the brush has been neglected likely tufts are adhered to the floor with photopolymer waste. You will have to dig through this and afterward, vacuum up all the debris.

                        When the machine is drained out at the end of the day, run the flat of your hand over the brushes to straighten them out. This will prevent the matting prblem.

                        Brushes are expensive to replace, but it they are taken care, they can last for quite some long time.

                        Gerald
                        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


                        On 5/24/11 6:45 AM, Aaron Wendt wrote: What is the best way to clean wash-out brushes that have been neglected? There are matted areas in the brushes. Anderson/Vreeland can't really recommend any solvent or solution to loosen up the old polymers.

                        Thanks!

                        Aaron



                      • bielerpr
                        Aaron Ran this response through a bit too quickly and let auto word mess it all up. Sorry about that. It should have read Use a heavy duty dog hair COMB or
                        Message 11 of 11 , May 27, 2011
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                          Aaron

                          Ran this response through a bit too quickly and let auto word mess it all up. Sorry about that. It should have read "Use a heavy duty dog hair COMB or PAINT brush COMB..." Yeah, you need combs. These unsuspecting tools work well, but they do take a beating... to clean out a completely messed up brush plate you might need a couple of them. Good thing, they are not expensive.

                          Gerald
                          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



                          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Gerald Lange <Bieler@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Aaron
                          >
                          > There is a short article here on brush maintenance:
                          >
                          > http://bielerpressxi.blogspot.com/2006/05/brush-maintenance-and-adjustment.html
                          >
                          > Use a heavy duty dog hair brush or plate brush cleaner to comb the tufts
                          > straight. If the brush has been neglected likely tufts are adhered to
                          > the floor with photopolymer waste. You will have to dig through this and
                          > afterward, vacuum up all the debris.
                          >
                          > When the machine is drained out at the end of the day, run the flat of
                          > your hand over the brushes to straighten them out. This will prevent the
                          > matting prblem.
                          >
                          > Brushes are expensive to replace, but it they are taken care, they can
                          > last for quite some long time.
                          >
                          > Gerald
                          > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
                          >
                          >
                          > On 5/24/11 6:45 AM, Aaron Wendt wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > What is the best way to clean wash-out brushes that have been
                          > > neglected? There are matted areas in the brushes. Anderson/Vreeland
                          > > can't really recommend any solvent or solution to loosen up the old
                          > > polymers.
                          > >
                          > > Thanks!
                          > >
                          > > Aaron
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
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