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Re: faux blind impression

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  • Peter Fraterdeus
    Hi Selene Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link. Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it now. Try this:
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 14 10:28 AM
      Hi Selene

      Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
      Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it now.

      Try this:
      http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd

      Cheers!

      peter



      On 14 Apr 2011, at 11:02 AM, Selene F wrote:

      > Peter -
      > I wanted to see your example of faux blind impression, but the link you provided came back null. Flickr said:
      >
      > "This is not the page you're looking for.
      > It looks like you're trying to see something in slowprint's photostream."
      >
      > But then I couldn't find right away any FBI printing examples.
      >
      > Can you correct your link? I was very informed by your post and would like to see the example.
      >
      > Thanks much,
      > Selene
      >
      > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
      >
      >> From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
      >> Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Gray color changes when dry
      >> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      >> Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 8:39 AM
      >> Hmmm
      >>
      >> Now I know what printing and economics have in common ;-)
      >>
      >> Since we're weighing in, I'll throw my two cents, since I
      >> just gave exactly the opposite advice regarding Michael's
      >> tip to the uninitiated.
      >>
      >>> "Here's a tip for the uninitiated. When choosing a
      >> Pantone color for letterpress (heavier inking than the
      >> offset printed chip books) spec a hue lighter. The extra
      >> coverage will yield a hue matching the color you really
      >> want."
      >>
      >>
      >> I, to the contrary, advise designers to spec a hue darker,
      >> since I like to under-ink the type a wee bit and use the
      >> thinnest possible ink-film and the highest possible rollers
      >> in order to get razor sharp impression with no spread, and
      >> the ink laying only at the bottom of the 'well' of the
      >> impression, regardless of depth.
      >>
      >> That is, the 10x loupe will show no 'ring' around the
      >> type.
      >>
      >> Strangely, that's also the advice given in my 1930's Miehle
      >> Vertical handbook.
      >> (Of course there was no Pantone then, but there were color
      >> swatchbooks...)
      >>
      >> NB, of course, that printing solids on dark stock throws
      >> off all bets. Multiple hits is the best solution if
      >> feasible, of course.
      >>
      >> Also, my oil based inks, similar in composition (at least
      >> in principle) to that used by Caxton, Caslon, Bodoni,
      >> Gutenberg, et al don't dry glossy at all. At least not on
      >> the uncoated stock that I'm using.
      >>
      >> Ah, also mixing with opaque white definitely gains plenty,
      >> I'm not sure where Michael's observation comes from.
      >> Transparent "white" is not white, but clear, and it dilutes
      >> the pigment in the ink. In theory, on an offset press, with
      >> a bright white paper, this dilution will produce the Pantone
      >> color specified. However, on a warm white stock, for
      >> instance, the color will be... warmer.
      >>
      >> Opaque white is a pigment in a medium. It blends (mixes,
      >> really) with the pigment in the colored ink and produces a
      >> COMPLETELY different body and effect on paper than the
      >> transparent. Add a bit of Magnesium Carbonate (printer's
      >> chalk) and again, the density and body of the ink are even
      >> more perfected (and even less 'glossy' in fact). For true
      >> transparent glazes (as I use regularly for 'faux' blind
      >> impressions*) you don't use opaque white or mag ( otherwise
      >> you'll get a muddy pastel effect).
      >>
      >> Your milage may vary, some settling may occur, this email
      >> is sold by weight, not by volume.
      >>
      >> Best wishes to all, regardless of opinion ;-)
      >> (mighty fine work all around!)
      >>
      >> Ciao
      >>
      >> Peter
      >>
      >> * I find that blind impressions don't read well in thinner
      >> stocks, and often advise designers that we would want to add
      >> a very little bit of 'glaze' (just transp white with a tiny
      >> speck of the job color mixed in) to give the eye a sense of
      >> shadow there. Of course on a double-thick covers (Lettra
      >> 220#, et al) we can put the impression deep enough to read
      >> the shadow directly. For an example of the
      >> faux-blind-impression:
      >> http://bit.ly/dOXBHk
      >>
      >> PS, back to the topic of anti-skinning strategies I'm
      >> thinking of getting some nitrogen gas for my ink cans, like
      >> vintners use to keep wine from oxidizing.
      >> I also read about old-timers who actually put water in the
      >> can. I haven't tried it yet, but it seems like it could
      >> work!
      >>
      >> In the meantime, I do pretty well with a circle of mylar
      >> pressed down into the surface.
      >>
      >> Finally, IMHO, rubber inks smell funny and can't be used
      >> for over-printing without nasty driers, etc etc etc.
      >>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> While so-called oil base inks do tend to dry to a
      >> glossier appearance than rubber base inks, they are
      >> definitely well suited for uncoated stocks. Many thousands
      >> of printers use oil base ink on uncoated paper successfully.
      >> I'll just say that "to each their own" and you might want to
      >> try both before writing off either. Many different
      >> manufacturers make many different types of oil base inks, so
      >> I'd be suspicious of any blanket statement about "oil base
      >> inks." From what I understand, they're all oil base, really,
      >> it's just a matter of which oil(s).
      >>>
      >>> Thanks
      >>> Harold
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> On Thu, Apr 14, 2011 at 10:45 AM, MichaelB <mjb@...>
      >> wrote:
      >>>
      >>> Hi Jessica,
      >>>
      >>> Contrary to Gerald's experience, I've been applying
      >> anti-skin into cans of RBP for years. Keeps things fresh,
      >> and especially critical if it's an oil base such as all the
      >> metallics.
      >>>
      >>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/5541791812/in/photostream/
      >>>
      >>> Aside from the metallics, you may want to avoid oil
      >> based inks. They dry to a gloss, and are for coated papers.
      >> The Rubber Base Plus inks are made for uncoated stocks. All
      >> bets are off with oil based print making inks that some folk
      >> love. I'm a recent convert to Graphic Chemical's Oil Base
      >> Opaque White. Better coverage and opacity than Van Son. But
      >> that's an exception.
      >>>
      >>> As regards the cast you are seeing on dry-back, as
      >> mentioned, if you check the formula for the warm grays
      >> you'll note the infinitesimal amount of Red 032. So, that is
      >> why you are seeing a pink cast to your grey. That said, I'm
      >> not sure about the logic in expecting the Opaque White to
      >> provide a more rich color.
      >>>
      >>> All Pantone colors are translucent and depend upon the
      >> white of the paper to impart their color. That's why the
      >> formula guides and chip books are printed on a bright white
      >> paper.
      >>>
      >>> I just had a can of Cool Grey 10 custom mixed by Van
      >> Son with an Opaque White base in RBP and upon wash up found
      >> very distinctly how the component parts separated out:
      >>>
      >>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/5566445225/in/photostream
      >>>
      >>> So the question is, what color paper were you printing
      >> on the necessitated an opaque white base? If it was a white
      >> paper, you gained nothing.
      >>>
      >>> My job was running on black paper, and I noted a blue
      >> cast which I knocked back by adding more Opaque White,
      >> Pantone Mixing Black (which hasn't the blue undercast of
      >> 10850 black), and 877 Silver just for fun.
      >>>
      >>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/interrobang918/page15/
      >>>
      >>> Here's a tip for the uninitiated. When choosing a
      >> Pantone color for letterpress (heavier inking than the
      >> offset printed chip books) spec a hue lighter. The extra
      >> coverage will yield a hue matching the color you really
      >> want.
      >>>
      >>> Good luck.
      >>>
      >>> mjb | interrobang letterpress / linotypesetting.com /
      >> typeconsortium.org
      >>>
      >>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com,
      >> "bielerpr" <Bieler@...> wrote:
      >>>>
      >>>> Anti-skin spray is not something you want in your
      >> ink cans as it is a solvent. On very rare occasion when I
      >> just don't have the energy to clean up the press after a
      >> long day's run I have used it to spray the rollers to keep
      >> the ink from drying until the next morning. But spraying
      >> this into ink that you expect to use again is just asking
      >> for problems.
      >>>>
      >>>> Gerald
      >>>> http://bielerpress.blogspot.com
      >>>>
      >>>>
      >>>> --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com,
      >> Leslie Ross-Robertson <modernoptic@> wrote:
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Hello Jessica:
      >>>>> Â
      >>>>> I have had the anti-skin spray change my
      >> opaque white a yellowish color...
      >>>>> Â
      >>>>> Best,
      >>>>> Â
      >>>>> Leslie
      >>>>>
      >>>>> --- On Wed, 4/13/11, Jessica Hosgood
      >> <jessica.hosgood@> wrote:
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>> From: Jessica Hosgood
      >> <jessica.hosgood@>
      >>>>> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Gray color changes
      >> when dry
      >>>>> To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
      >>>>> Date: Wednesday, April 13, 2011, 11:01 AM
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Â
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Hello everybody,
      >>>>>
      >>>>> This is my first post here.
      >>>>>
      >>>>> We just printed a job with a large solid
      >> area in warm gray 3. The gray was mixed with opaque white
      >> instead of transparent white in order to have a richer, more
      >> dense color. The problem is that after complete drying (3 or
      >> 4 days) the gray turns pinkish, looking more like a pantone
      >> 407.
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Has anyone run into this problem before?
      >> Does this happen because of the opaque white? Or may it be
      >> that the inks are out of date? All cans were opened about 4
      >> months ago. Also, we use Van Son's oil based inked. Could
      >> this be a reaction induced by the anti skin spray?
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Any idea or solution would be welcome.
      >>>>>
      >>>>> Thank you,
      >>>>> Jessica
      >>>>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>> --
      >>> ---
      >>> Boxcar Press
      >>> 501 W. Fayette St. #222
      >>> Syracuse, NY 13204
      >>> www.boxcarpress.com
      >>>
      >>
      >>
      >> Peter Fraterdeus
      >> Exquisite letterpress takes time™
      >> http://slowprint.com/
      >>
      >> IdeasWords : Idea Swords
      >> Communication Strategy
      >> Semiotx.com @ideaswords
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> ------------------------------------
      >>
      >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      >>
      >>
      >> PPLetterpress-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
      >>
      >>
      >>
    • Selene F
      Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 14 11:37 AM
        Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you described? It looks terrific! I might have to give this a try, to enhance the next blind impression that I do.

        Thanks for posting,
        Selene


        --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:

        > From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
        > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression
        > To: "PPLetterpress" <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
        > Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
        > Hi Selene
        >
        > Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
        > Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it
        > now.
        >
        > Try this:
        > http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd
        >
        > Cheers!
        >
        > peter
        >
        >
        >
      • Peter Fraterdeus
        ... Exactly. Since it s on a lighter weight (Copperplate Etching 300gsm) when I ran it without the glaze, you could barely see the impression. I don t want to
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 14 11:49 AM
          On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:37 PM, Selene F wrote:

          > Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you described? It looks terrific! I might have to give this a try, to enhance the next blind impression that I do.


          Exactly. Since it's on a lighter weight (Copperplate Etching 300gsm) when I ran it without the glaze, you could barely see the impression. I don't want to punch through the back of a thinner sheet. If I have the depth of the double-thick stock, I'll go deep, but otherwise this allows us to get the visual effect with sensitivity to the materials.

          I have to say that the Hahnemuhle Copperplate (Atlantic Papers, Importers) is one of the most perfect letterpress sheets I've ever used. It makes Lettra seem like dried up newsprint.

          Cheers!

          P

          >
          > Thanks for posting,
          > Selene
          >
          >
          > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
          >
          >> From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
          >> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression
          >> To: "PPLetterpress" <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
          >> Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
          >> Hi Selene
          >>
          >> Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
          >> Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it
          >> now.
          >>
          >> Try this:
          >> http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd
          >>
          >> Cheers!
          >>
          >> peter
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Amber Ellis-Seguine
          Peter, Looks great, what color did you tint with? I know you said one from the invite, or at least I thought that s what you said. I have a job on the queue
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 14 11:55 AM
            Peter, 
            Looks great, what color did you tint with? I know you said one from the invite, or at least I thought that's what you said. I have a job on the queue that I will be doing the same and would love to try it. 

            Cheers, 
            Amber 

            p.s. platemaker and plates are looking great, thanks for the help. 


            • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
            Amber Ellis-Seguine
            650.468.9537
            650.347.4066
            • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




            On Apr 14, 2011, at 11:49 AM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

            On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:37 PM, Selene F wrote:

            > Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you described? It looks terrific! I might have to give this a try, to enhance the next blind impression that I do.

            Exactly. Since it's on a lighter weight (Copperplate Etching 300gsm) when I ran it without the glaze, you could barely see the impression. I don't want to punch through the back of a thinner sheet. If I have the depth of the double-thick stock, I'll go deep, but otherwise this allows us to get the visual effect with sensitivity to the materials. 

            I have to say that the Hahnemuhle Copperplate (Atlantic Papers, Importers) is one of the most perfect letterpress sheets I've ever used. It makes Lettra seem like dried up newsprint.

            Cheers!

            P

            > 
            > Thanks for posting,
            > Selene
            > 
            > 
            > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
            > 
            >> From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
            >> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression
            >> To: "PPLetterpress" <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
            >> Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
            >> Hi Selene
            >> 
            >> Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
            >> Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it
            >> now.
            >> 
            >> Try this:
            >> http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd
            >> 
            >> Cheers!
            >> 
            >> peter
            >> 
            >> 
            >> 
            > 
            > 
            > ------------------------------------
            > 
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > 
            > 
            > 


          • Peter Fraterdeus
            Hi Amber! Tinted with black in this case. It does not take much. A tiny millet sized dot or two of the color. Really, a pea s worth would be way too much! I
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 14 12:11 PM
              Hi Amber!

              Tinted with black in this case. It does not take much. A tiny millet sized dot or two of the color. Really, a pea's worth would be way too much!

              I don't think I actually used the grey ink, since that was mixed with opaque white and mag, which makes the glaze look gritty.

              Of course, I love doing true blind impressions, since it gains the same price as an inked run and I don't have to clean the press, or adjust the rollers, or mess with the inks... But I'm cursed with an absurd passion for perfection ;-)

              Glad to hear your plates are coming out. I had some real headaches when I first started with it. One thing to watch very closely is that your film is very dense. When I first started getting film from a local printer, they would run some dense others very thin, since the exposure on their offset plates is only 30 seconds, it was fine by them. I ended up pulling out hair trying to figure why my plates would be perfect one time and awful the next, until I realized I could see my overhead lights through the black area on the offending film.

              Good luck!

              P  

              On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:55 PM, Amber Ellis-Seguine wrote:



              Peter, 
              Looks great, what color did you tint with? I know you said one from the invite, or at least I thought that's what you said. I have a job on the queue that I will be doing the same and would love to try it. 

              Cheers, 
              Amber 

              p.s. platemaker and plates are looking great, thanks for the help. 


              • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
              Amber Ellis-Seguine
              650.468.9537
              650.347.4066
              • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




              On Apr 14, 2011, at 11:49 AM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

              On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:37 PM, Selene F wrote:

              > Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you described? It looks terrific! I might have to give this a try, to enhance the next blind impression that I do.

              Exactly. Since it's on a lighter weight (Copperplate Etching 300gsm) when I ran it without the glaze, you could barely see the impression. I don't want to punch through the back of a thinner sheet. If I have the depth of the double-thick stock, I'll go deep, but otherwise this allows us to get the visual effect with sensitivity to the materials. 

              I have to say that the Hahnemuhle Copperplate (Atlantic Papers, Importers) is one of the most perfect letterpress sheets I've ever used. It makes Lettra seem like dried up newsprint.

              Cheers!

              P

              > 
              > Thanks for posting,
              > Selene
              > 
              > 
              > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
              > 
              >> From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
              >> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression
              >> To: "PPLetterpress" <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
              >> Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
              >> Hi Selene
              >> 
              >> Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
              >> Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it
              >> now.
              >> 
              >> Try this:
              >> http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd
              >> 
              >> Cheers!
              >> 
              >> peter
              >> 
              >> 
              >> 
              > 
              > 
              > ------------------------------------
              > 
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > 
              > 
              > 





            • Brian Allen
              I ve used a fingerprint s worth of yellow with Van Son overprint varnish (#30 I think is was), on 110# Lettra, complex background pattern, with platen press,
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 17 5:58 PM
                I've used a fingerprint's worth of yellow with Van Son overprint varnish (#30 I think is was), on 110# Lettra, complex background pattern, with platen press, and got a wonderful bone-color white, which more than made up for the inability of canyon-deep impression w/ platen press. Everyone loves the sample, and the client was overjoyed.

                Contrary to much current practice, subtlety and understatement can cause swooning with elegance, rather then being dropped to the floor with letterpress smashing in the face.

                Brian Allen
                Durham, North Carolina
                Thankfully, no tornadoes here


                On Apr 14, 2011, at 3:11 PM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

                 

                Hi Amber!

                Tinted with black in this case. It does not take much. A tiny millet sized dot or two of the color. Really, a pea's worth would be way too much!

                I don't think I actually used the grey ink, since that was mixed with opaque white and mag, which makes the glaze look gritty.

                Of course, I love doing true blind impressions, since it gains the same price as an inked run and I don't have to clean the press, or adjust the rollers, or mess with the inks... But I'm cursed with an absurd passion for perfection ;-)

                Glad to hear your plates are coming out. I had some real headaches when I first started with it. One thing to watch very closely is that your film is very dense. When I first started getting film from a local printer, they would run some dense others very thin, since the exposure on their offset plates is only 30 seconds, it was fine by them. I ended up pulling out hair trying to figure why my plates would be perfect one time and awful the next, until I realized I could see my overhead lights through the black area on the offending film.

                Good luck!

                P  

                On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:55 PM, Amber Ellis-Seguine wrote:



                Peter, 
                Looks great, what color did you tint with? I know you said one from the invite, or at least I thought that's what you said. I have a job on the queue that I will be doing the same and would love to try it. 

                Cheers, 
                Amber 

                p.s. platemaker and plates are looking great, thanks for the help. 


                • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
                Amber Ellis-Seguine
                650.468.9537
                650.347.4066
                • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




                On Apr 14, 2011, at 11:49 AM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

                On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:37 PM, Selene F wrote:

                > Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you described? It looks terrific! I might have to give this a try, to enhance the next blind impression that I do.

                Exactly. Since it's on a lighter weight (Copperplate Etching 300gsm) when I ran it without the glaze, you could barely see the impression. I don't want to punch through the back of a thinner sheet. If I have the depth of the double-thick stock, I'll go deep, but otherwise this allows us to get the visual effect with sensitivity to the materials. 

                I have to say that the Hahnemuhle Copperplate (Atlantic Papers, Importers) is one of the most perfect letterpress sheets I've ever used. It makes Lettra seem like dried up newsprint.

                Cheers!

                P

                > 
                > Thanks for posting,
                > Selene
                > 
                > 
                > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                > 
                >> From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
                >> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression
                >> To: "PPLetterpress" <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                >> Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
                >> Hi Selene
                >> 
                >> Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
                >> Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it
                >> now.
                >> 
                >> Try this:
                >> http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd
                >> 
                >> Cheers!
                >> 
                >> peter
                >> 
                >> 
                >> 
                > 
                > 
                > ------------------------------------
                > 
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > 
                > 
                > 







              • Nicholas
                I m looking for letterpress folks in the Jackson, MS area. If anyone can point any out to me, I ll appreciate it. T. J. Ray ________________________________
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 17 7:14 PM

                  I'm looking for letterpress folks in the Jackson, MS area.  If anyone can point any out to me,
                  I'll appreciate it.

                  T. J. Ray

                • Ed Inman
                  I d be glad to work/teach at the state Ag museum print shop for as little as $20/hr. I doubt anyone with a lifetime of letterpress experience is going to offer
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 17 8:52 PM
                     
                    I'd be glad to work/teach at the state Ag museum print shop for as little as $20/hr.
                    I doubt anyone with a lifetime of letterpress experience is going to offer it any cheaper.
                    Ed
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Nicholas
                    Sent: Apr 17, 2011 9:14 PM
                    To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [PPLetterpress] Letterlpress in Jackson, MS




                    I'm looking for letterpress folks in the Jackson, MS area.  If anyone can point any out to me,
                    I'll appreciate it.

                    T. J. Ray



                  • Mark Olson
                    Brian-- Where did you get the Van Son overprint varnish? Thanks, Mark Olson Innerer Klang Letterpress Asheville, NC No tornadoes here either, thank Gutenberg
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 18 8:03 AM
                      Brian--

                      Where did you get the Van Son overprint varnish?

                      Thanks,
                      Mark Olson
                      Innerer Klang Letterpress
                      Asheville, NC
                      No tornadoes here either, thank Gutenberg




                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Brian Allen <allenprinter@...>
                      To: PPLetterpress <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Sun, Apr 17, 2011 8:58 pm
                      Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression

                       
                      I've used a fingerprint's worth of yellow with Van Son overprint varnish (#30 I think is was), on 110# Lettra, complex background pattern, with platen press, and got a wonderful bone-color white, which more than made up for the inability of canyon-deep impression w/ platen press. Everyone loves the sample, and the client was overjoyed.

                      Contrary to much current practice, subtlety and understatement can cause swooning with elegance, rather then being dropped to the floor with letterpress smashing in the face.

                      Brian Allen
                      Durham, North Carolina
                      Thankfully, no tornadoes here


                      On Apr 14, 2011, at 3:11 PM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

                       

                      Hi Amber!

                      Tinted with black in this case. It does not take much. A tiny millet sized dot or two of the color. Really, a pea's worth would be way too much!

                      I don't think I actually used the grey ink, since that was mixed with opaque white and mag, which makes the glaze look gritty.

                      Of course, I love doing true blind impressions, since it gains the same price as an inked run and I don't have to clean the press, or adjust the rollers, or mess with the inks... But I'm cursed with an absurd passion for perfection ;-)

                      Glad to hear your plates are coming out. I had some real headaches when I first started with it. One thing to watch very closely is that your film is very dense. When I first started getting film from a local printer, they would run some dense others very thin, since the exposure on their offset plates is only 30 seconds, it was fine by them. I ended up pulling out hair trying to figure why my plates would be perfect one time and awful the next, until I realized I could see my overhead lights through the black area on the offending film.

                      Good luck!

                      P  

                      On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:55 PM, Amber Ellis-Seguine wrote:



                      Peter, 
                      Looks great, what color did you tint with? I know you said one from the invite, or at least I thought that's what you said. I have a job on the queue that I will be doing the same and would love to try it. 

                      Cheers, 
                      Amber 

                      p.s. platemaker and plates are looking great, thanks for the help. 


                      • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
                      Amber Ellis-Seguine
                      650.468.9537
                      650.347.4066
                      • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




                      On Apr 14, 2011, at 11:49 AM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

                      On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:37 PM, Selene F wrote:

                      > Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you described? It looks terrific! I might have to give this a try, to enhance the next blind impression that I do.

                      Exactly. Since it's on a lighter weight (Copperplate Etching 300gsm) when I ran it without the glaze, you could barely see the impression. I don't want to punch through the back of a thinner sheet. If I have the depth of the double-thick stock, I'll go deep, but otherwise this allows us to get the visual effect with sensitivity to the materials. 

                      I have to say that the Hahnemuhle Copperplate (Atlantic Papers, Importers) is one of the most perfect letterpress sheets I've ever used. It makes Lettra seem like dried up newsprint.

                      Cheers!

                      P

                      > 
                      > Thanks for posting,
                      > Selene
                      > 
                      > 
                      > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                      > 
                      >> From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
                      >> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression
                      >> To: "PPLetterpress" <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                      >> Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
                      >> Hi Selene
                      >> 
                      >> Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
                      >> Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it
                      >> now.
                      >> 
                      >> Try this:
                      >> http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd
                      >> 
                      >> Cheers!
                      >> 
                      >> peter
                      >> 
                      >> 
                      >> 
                      > 
                      > 
                      > ------------------------------------
                      > 
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > 
                      > 
                      > 







                    • Brian Allen
                      I think I got it at Cobe Graphics in Raleigh; though Xpedx has or can get it in its retail stores. There s one in Charlotte. I imagine most ink companies can
                      Message 10 of 10 , Apr 18 11:38 AM
                        I think I got it at Cobe Graphics in Raleigh; though Xpedx has or can get it in its retail stores. There's one in Charlotte. I imagine most ink companies can do the same or have an equivalent. My can says "High Gloss Overprint Varnish"; Van Son product V2174. (Not #30 varnish as I said before.)

                        Brian Allen
                        Durham, North Carolina

                        On Apr 18, 2011, at 11:03 AM, Mark Olson wrote:

                         

                        Brian--

                        Where did you get the Van Son overprint varnish?

                        Thanks,
                        Mark Olson
                        Innerer Klang Letterpress
                        Asheville, NC
                        No tornadoes here either, thank Gutenberg





                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: Brian Allen <allenprinter@...>
                        To: PPLetterpress <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Sun, Apr 17, 2011 8:58 pm
                        Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression

                         
                        I've used a fingerprint's worth of yellow with Van Son overprint varnish (#30 I think is was), on 110# Lettra, complex background pattern, with platen press, and got a wonderful bone-color white, which more than made up for the inability of canyon-deep impression w/ platen press. Everyone loves the sample, and the client was overjoyed.

                        Contrary to much current practice, subtlety and understatement can cause swooning with elegance, rather then being dropped to the floor with letterpress smashing in the face.

                        Brian Allen
                        Durham, North Carolina
                        Thankfully, no tornadoes here


                        On Apr 14, 2011, at 3:11 PM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

                         

                        Hi Amber!

                        Tinted with black in this case. It does not take much. A tiny millet sized dot or two of the color. Really, a pea's worth would be way too much!

                        I don't think I actually used the grey ink, since that was mixed with opaque white and mag, which makes the glaze look gritty.

                        Of course, I love doing true blind impressions, since it gains the same price as an inked run and I don't have to clean the press, or adjust the rollers, or mess with the inks... But I'm cursed with an absurd passion for perfection ;-)

                        Glad to hear your plates are coming out. I had some real headaches when I first started with it. One thing to watch very closely is that your film is very dense. When I first started getting film from a local printer, they would run some dense others very thin, since the exposure on their offset plates is only 30 seconds, it was fine by them. I ended up pulling out hair trying to figure why my plates would be perfect one time and awful the next, until I realized I could see my overhead lights through the black area on the offending film.

                        Good luck!

                        P  

                        On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:55 PM, Amber Ellis-Seguine wrote:



                        Peter, 
                        Looks great, what color did you tint with? I know you said one from the invite, or at least I thought that's what you said. I have a job on the queue that I will be doing the same and would love to try it. 

                        Cheers, 
                        Amber 

                        p.s. platemaker and plates are looking great, thanks for the help. 


                        • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
                        Amber Ellis-Seguine
                        650.468.9537
                        650.347.4066
                        • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




                        On Apr 14, 2011, at 11:49 AM, Peter Fraterdeus wrote:

                        On 14 Apr 2011, at 1:37 PM, Selene F wrote:

                        > Just to confirm, all the areas that look like they are blind printed: the scallops, the ampersand, the map; those were all done with the slight tint you described? It looks terrific! I might have to give this a try, to enhance the next blind impression that I do.

                        Exactly. Since it's on a lighter weight (Copperplate Etching 300gsm) when I ran it without the glaze, you could barely see the impression. I don't want to punch through the back of a thinner sheet. If I have the depth of the double-thick stock, I'll go deep, but otherwise this allows us to get the visual effect with sensitivity to the materials. 

                        I have to say that the Hahnemuhle Copperplate (Atlantic Papers, Importers) is one of the most perfect letterpress sheets I've ever used. It makes Lettra seem like dried up newsprint.

                        Cheers!

                        P

                        > 
                        > Thanks for posting,
                        > Selene
                        > 
                        > 
                        > --- On Thu, 4/14/11, Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...> wrote:
                        > 
                        >> From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
                        >> Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: faux blind impression
                        >> To: "PPLetterpress" <PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com>
                        >> Date: Thursday, April 14, 2011, 10:28 AM
                        >> Hi Selene
                        >> 
                        >> Oops, sorry. bit.ly redirected to a private Flickr link.
                        >> Since the wedding is long past, I think we can change it
                        >> now.
                        >> 
                        >> Try this:
                        >> http://flic.kr/s/aHsjkyMdUd
                        >> 
                        >> Cheers!
                        >> 
                        >> peter
                        >> 
                        >> 
                        >> 
                        > 
                        > 
                        > ------------------------------------
                        > 
                        > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > 
                        > 
                        > 









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