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Re: Flattening homemade steel backed plates

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  • heytrollop
    Thanks for all the tips. I know we ve tried to adjust it but I ll give it another go with your advice. It would be great not to end up with a bent plate! raven
    Message 1 of 22 , Mar 24, 2011
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      Thanks for all the tips. I know we've tried to adjust it but I'll give it another go with your advice.

      It would be great not to end up with a bent plate!

      raven



      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "s_milo_88" <emilbong@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > I'm getting started making my own plates at home with a homemade exposure table (with vacuum table + kreene). The photopolymer itself is exposing well, but the steel backing is warped, particularly at the edges. When printing on my Kelsey, the impression seems to be fine, but the warping gets in the way of proper inking. Part of the problem happens during cutting as one side of the unexposed plate will curl and the other will at least warp somewhat.
      >
      > Does anyone have any suggestions either to avoid this or unwarp the plates after cutting or exposure?
      >
      > Thanks!
      > Milo
      >
    • alandye@pacbell.net
      Milo, Tinsmiths or other metal workers (like rain gutter installers) have a tool that looks like a very small brayer but the roller is steel instead of rubber.
      Message 2 of 22 , Mar 25, 2011
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        Milo,

        Tinsmiths or other metal workers (like rain gutter installers) have a tool that looks like a very small brayer but the roller is steel instead of rubber. The roller is only about 1 inch wide with a wood handle. They use this to flatten sheet metal after it has been cut and has a curled edge. They lay the sheet metal on a hard stone surface and then bray the edge down from the back side of the curl to flatten it.

        Assuming you can buy one of these tools from a local metalworking shop or hardware store, and assuming you have enough lip on your plate after cutting to flip it over, put the curl on a stone and hang the raised image off the edge, you could bray down the curl using one of these. Don't use your aluminum base to bray down, get a scrap piece of granite countertop to use, or the edge of your composing stone if you have one.

        Best,

        Alan

        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "s_milo_88" <emilbong@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > I'm getting started making my own plates at home with a homemade exposure table (with vacuum table + kreene). The photopolymer itself is exposing well, but the steel backing is warped, particularly at the edges. When printing on my Kelsey, the impression seems to be fine, but the warping gets in the way of proper inking. Part of the problem happens during cutting as one side of the unexposed plate will curl and the other will at least warp somewhat.
        >
        > Does anyone have any suggestions either to avoid this or unwarp the plates after cutting or exposure?
        >
        > Thanks!
        > Milo
        >
      • Eric
        ... You can use a printmaker s burnisher in the same way, and they can be found at art supply stores, or from General Graphics, or manufacturers such as Lyons
        Message 3 of 22 , Mar 25, 2011
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          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "alandye@..." <alandye@...> wrote:
          >
          > Tinsmiths or other metal workers (like rain gutter installers) have a tool that looks like a very small brayer but the roller is steel instead of rubber. The roller is only about 1 inch wide with a wood handle. They use this to flatten sheet metal after it has been cut and has a curled edge. They lay the sheet metal on a hard stone surface and then bray the edge down from the back side of the curl to flatten it.
          >

          You can use a printmaker's burnisher in the same way, and they can be found at art supply stores, or from General Graphics, or manufacturers such as Lyons or Muller.
          --Eric Holub, SF
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