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Re: off the (plumbing) grid platemakers?

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  • bielerpr
    Mike These take more than five gallons of water. You ll quickly tire of hauling that pail back and forth down the hall just to make plates. Gerald
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 11, 2011
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      Mike

      These take more than five gallons of water. You'll quickly tire of hauling that pail back and forth down the hall just to make plates.

      Gerald
      http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dacey <dace@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Folks -
      > Things seem to get busier by the week here and the prospect of making plates
      > in-house is growing more and more appealing. However, the plumbing work
      > needed for a platemaker would be fairly extensive where I'm located.
      >
      > Is anyone running a platemaker where they fill and drain manually? I'm not
      > familiar enough with these machines to know if this would even be possible
      > but carrying a 5-gal bucket down the hall once in a while seems like a fine
      > workaround for the time being if it were an option.
      >
      > Looking forward to hearing any thoughts on this - thanks.
      > -----
      >
      > Mike Dacey
      >
      > Repeat Press
      > Custom Letterpress Printing
      >
      > 9 Olive Square
      > Somerville, MA 02143
      > 617.299.0918
      >
      > www.repeatpress.com
      > www.facebook.com/repeatpress
      > @repeatpress <http://www.twitter.com/repeatpress>
      >
    • Mike Dacey
      Thanks Gerald - I couldn t find any info on what the volume of the washout bath would typically be. Peter seems to think that it s not such a big deal though -
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 12, 2011
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        Thanks Gerald - I couldn't find any info on what the volume of the washout bath would typically be. Peter seems to think that it's not such a big deal though - how often do folks cycle the water in their machines? More than daily?

        Of course I'd like to get a plumbing hookup eventually but if there's a way to get started sooner than later I might give it a shot - wasn't sure if it was technically possible but it sounds like it's a possibility.
        -----

        Mike Dacey

        Repeat Press
        Custom Letterpress Printing

        9 Olive Square
        Somerville, MA 02143
        617.299.0918

        www.repeatpress.com
        www.facebook.com/repeatpress
        @repeatpress




        On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 10:55 PM, bielerpr <Bieler@...> wrote:
         

        Mike

        These take more than five gallons of water. You'll quickly tire of hauling that pail back and forth down the hall just to make plates.

        Gerald
        http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dacey <dace@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Folks -
        > Things seem to get busier by the week here and the prospect of making plates
        > in-house is growing more and more appealing. However, the plumbing work
        > needed for a platemaker would be fairly extensive where I'm located.
        >
        > Is anyone running a platemaker where they fill and drain manually? I'm not
        > familiar enough with these machines to know if this would even be possible
        > but carrying a 5-gal bucket down the hall once in a while seems like a fine
        > workaround for the time being if it were an option.
        >
        > Looking forward to hearing any thoughts on this - thanks.
        > -----
        >
        > Mike Dacey
        >
        > Repeat Press
        > Custom Letterpress Printing
        >
        > 9 Olive Square
        > Somerville, MA 02143
        > 617.299.0918
        >
        > www.repeatpress.com
        > www.facebook.com/repeatpress
        > @repeatpress <http://www.twitter.com/repeatpress>
        >


      • bielerpr
        Mike A quick reference. An A&V Orbital X at 24x30 holds 22 gallons, at 12x18, 9.5 gallons. Plus. To clean the bath you would drain and spray plus refill and
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 12, 2011
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          Mike

          A quick reference. An A&V Orbital X at 24x30 holds 22 gallons, at 12x18, 9.5 gallons. Plus. To clean the bath you would drain and spray plus refill and drain (while resetting the brush tufts). Daily. That is, if you want to keep the bath clean of polymer coating and fungus, and extend the longevity of the brush.

          Gerald
          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dacey <dace@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks Gerald - I couldn't find any info on what the volume of the washout
          > bath would typically be. Peter seems to think that it's not such a big deal
          > though - how often do folks cycle the water in their machines? More than
          > daily?
          >
          > Of course I'd like to get a plumbing hookup eventually but if there's a way
          > to get started sooner than later I might give it a shot - wasn't sure if it
          > was technically possible but it sounds like it's a possibility.
          > -----
          >
          > Mike Dacey
          >
          > Repeat Press
          > Custom Letterpress Printing
          >
          > 9 Olive Square
          > Somerville, MA 02143
          > 617.299.0918
          >
          > www.repeatpress.com
          > www.facebook.com/repeatpress
          > @repeatpress <http://www.twitter.com/repeatpress>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Fri, Mar 11, 2011 at 10:55 PM, bielerpr <Bieler@...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > > Mike
          > >
          > > These take more than five gallons of water. You'll quickly tire of hauling
          > > that pail back and forth down the hall just to make plates.
          > >
          > > Gerald
          > > http://BielerPress.blogspot.com
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dacey <dace@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi Folks -
          > > > Things seem to get busier by the week here and the prospect of making
          > > plates
          > > > in-house is growing more and more appealing. However, the plumbing work
          > > > needed for a platemaker would be fairly extensive where I'm located.
          > > >
          > > > Is anyone running a platemaker where they fill and drain manually? I'm
          > > not
          > > > familiar enough with these machines to know if this would even be
          > > possible
          > > > but carrying a 5-gal bucket down the hall once in a while seems like a
          > > fine
          > > > workaround for the time being if it were an option.
          > > >
          > > > Looking forward to hearing any thoughts on this - thanks.
          > > > -----
          > > >
          > > > Mike Dacey
          > > >
          > > > Repeat Press
          > > > Custom Letterpress Printing
          > > >
          > > > 9 Olive Square
          > > > Somerville, MA 02143
          > > > 617.299.0918
          > > >
          > > > www.repeatpress.com
          > > > www.facebook.com/repeatpress
          > > > @repeatpress <http://www.twitter.com/repeatpress>
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • CaseyM
          I would like to add a question. I moved to Arkansas and the house is on a septic tank. My platemaker is an Orbital Vlll which holds about 9 gallons of water.
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 13, 2011
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            I would like to add a question. I moved to Arkansas and the house is on a septic tank. My platemaker is an Orbital Vlll which holds about 9 gallons of water. Does any anyone know if the water washout disposal down the drain would affect the septic tanks negatively?


            Casey McGarr
            Inky Lips Press
          • Fritz Klinke
            I ve wondered the same thing. Our new building is on septic rather than city sewer like we were for the first 13 years I ran our platemaker. I did a check to
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 13, 2011
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              I've wondered the same thing. Our new building is on septic rather than city sewer like we were for the first 13 years I ran our platemaker. I did a check to see what is actually suspended in the water and let a 5 gallon bucket with washout waste evaporate over a couple of months and the nasty sticky stuff that remained convinced me that I don't want it in our septic system. Granted that it gets diluted in any system, but these results were not to my liking. We may put as much crud and dirt into a sewer system when washing a load of dirty clothes, but I have been hesitant about the polymer waste. It does go back into solution when warm water is put back into the bucket, but still---.
               
              Fritz
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: CaseyM
              Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2011 9:30 AM
              Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: off the (plumbing) grid platemakers?

               

              I would like to add a question. I moved to Arkansas and the house is on a septic tank. My platemaker is an Orbital Vlll which holds about 9 gallons of water. Does any anyone know if the water washout disposal down the drain would affect the septic tanks negatively?

              Casey McGarr
              Inky Lips Press

            • bielerpr
              Casey When Patrick Reagh moved to northern California he encountered a similar problem. I believe local ordinances did not allow him to dump his photopolymer
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 13, 2011
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                Casey

                When Patrick Reagh moved to northern California he encountered a similar problem. I believe local ordinances did not allow him to dump his photopolymer waste into the septic system. So he put a big tank outside of his building and dumps directly into that. He lets the liquid evaporate and then occasionally digs out the particulate matter and disposes of it. At least that is how I recall the conversation I had with him about it.

                Gerald
                http://BielerPress.blogspot.com


                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "CaseyM" <casey@...> wrote:
                >
                > I would like to add a question. I moved to Arkansas and the house is on a septic tank. My platemaker is an Orbital Vlll which holds about 9 gallons of water. Does any anyone know if the water washout disposal down the drain would affect the septic tanks negatively?
                >
                >
                > Casey McGarr
                > Inky Lips Press
                >
              • Mark Attwood
                Hi Casey, I use a septic tank system, and have not seen any problems with polymer in the drain water in about 9 years. Regards, Mark. Mark Attwood tel 013 751
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 14, 2011
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                  Hi Casey,

                  I use a septic tank system, and have not seen any problems with polymer in the drain water in about 9 years.

                  Regards,

                  Mark.




                  Mark Attwood

                  tel 013 751 3225 or 083 676 3229


                  The Artists' Press
                  PO Box 1236
                  White River
                  1240

                  www.artprintsa.com




                • Greg S
                  Casey, From my understanding, there are a number of dynamics at work in a septic tank and drainfield. Activities inside the septic tank break down solids into
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 14, 2011
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                    Casey,
                    From my understanding, there are a number of dynamics at work in a septic tank and drainfield. Activities inside the septic tank break down solids into liquids and gases. Non-digested solids sink to the bottom of the tank and are periodically pumped out. Liquids float out of the tank into the drainfield (leech field), where they dissipate into ground water or are consumed by plants. I do not know if photopolymer gets converted into something benign in the septic tank or if it stays in solution to be transported to the drainfield where it could also possibly be benign. I would tend to think that liquid plastic in a drainfield would build up and cause problems with water dissipation. When there is enough of a problem (years or decades), the field fails and it is time to get out the checkbook. An evaporation tank would work, particularly in warm climates. I would consider pouring the solution on the ground before putting it into a drainfield, a plastic coated driveway.
                    -- Greg S
                     
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: bielerpr
                    Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2011 10:33 PM
                    Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: off the (plumbing) grid platemakers?

                     

                    Casey

                    When Patrick Reagh moved to northern California he encountered a similar problem. I believe local ordinances did not allow him to dump his photopolymer waste into the septic system. So he put a big tank outside of his building and dumps directly into that. He lets the liquid evaporate and then occasionally digs out the particulate matter and disposes of it. At least that is how I recall the conversation I had with him about it.

                    Gerald
                    http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "CaseyM" <casey@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I would like to add a question. I moved to Arkansas and the house is on a septic tank. My platemaker is an Orbital Vlll which holds about 9 gallons of water. Does any anyone know if the water washout disposal down the drain would affect the septic tanks negatively?
                    >
                    >
                    > Casey McGarr
                    > Inky Lips Press
                    >


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                  • Fred Smith
                    Can a septic system even accept ppl waste water? Septic systems require certain bacteria to processs the waste put in. If the material is toxic, it will kill
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 14, 2011
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                      Can a septic system even accept ppl waste water? Septic systems require certain bacteria to processs the waste put in. If the material is toxic, it will kill the bacteria and you will have to have the system pumped clean. Tell them its becuase of ppl waste and they may need to charge you a 'toxic' clean up fee. Even if the waste dosn't kill the bacteria, if it cant' be broken down, it will still clog the system with the same results. I would suggest contatcting the nearest septic cleaning company for advice. They'd either know or know who to contact.
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2011 9:22 PM
                      Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: off the (plumbing) grid platemakers?

                       

                      I've wondered the same thing. Our new building is on septic rather than city sewer like we were for the first 13 years I ran our platemaker. I did a check to see what is actually suspended in the water and let a 5 gallon bucket with washout waste evaporate over a couple of months and the nasty sticky stuff that remained convinced me that I don't want it in our septic system. Granted that it gets diluted in any system, but these results were not to my liking. We may put as much crud and dirt into a sewer system when washing a load of dirty clothes, but I have been hesitant about the polymer waste. It does go back into solution when warm water is put back into the bucket, but still---.


                       
                       
                       
                    • Scott Rubel
                      The sticky border that holds the vacuum sheet down in my plate maker is losing its sticky. Anybody know what sort of tape this is? It s not common double-sided
                      Message 10 of 16 , Mar 14, 2011
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                        The sticky border that holds the vacuum sheet down in my plate maker
                        is losing its sticky.

                        Anybody know what sort of tape this is? It's not common double-sided
                        stuff. That would have come apart or worn out years ago.

                        --Scott
                      • Gerald Lange
                        Hi Scott You are far better off not using tape at all. Just cut a sheet of kreene to the size of the vacuum table but about a half inch shorter both length
                        Message 11 of 16 , Mar 14, 2011
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                          Hi Scott

                          You are far better off not using tape at all. Just cut a sheet of
                          kreene to the size of the vacuum table but about a half inch shorter
                          both length and width, you will be a much happier camper. Flip back the
                          kreene, place the plate and neg, and flip back the kreene. No more messy
                          tape, no more vacuum problems caused by it.

                          I've been doing this for many years and every platemaker I have
                          suggested this to swears by it as well. I additionally add 6-pt brass
                          rule at the edges of the vacuum table, cut to its width and length on
                          all four sides after placement of the kreene and with the vacuum turned
                          on. This ensures the kreene won't buckle and leak during exposure.

                          Gerald
                          http://BielerPress.blogspot.com

                          On 3/14/11 8:17 PM, Scott Rubel wrote:
                          > The sticky border that holds the vacuum sheet down in my plate maker
                          > is losing its sticky.
                          >
                          > Anybody know what sort of tape this is? It's not common double-sided
                          > stuff. That would have come apart or worn out years ago.
                          >
                          > --Scott
                          >
                        • CaseyM
                          Thanks for everyones responses. It appears I need another way to dispose of the water and into the septic tank may not be the appropriate solution. Many thanks
                          Message 12 of 16 , Mar 17, 2011
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                            Thanks for everyones responses. It appears I need another way to dispose of the water and into the septic tank may not be the appropriate solution.

                            Many thanks as always.

                            Casey McGarr
                            Inky Lips Letterpress
                          • okintertype
                            Casey: I don t think a small amount of solution would hurt your septic system. Now if you were a big commercial operation, running many plates per day, that
                            Message 13 of 16 , Mar 17, 2011
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                              Casey: I don't think a small amount of solution would hurt your septic system. Now if you were a big commercial operation, running many plates per day, that might be another matter. The important thing for septic system health is to pump the inevitable solids on a regular basis. How often depends on your situation. Okla. State Univ. recommends every three to five years. We have a 1,000 gal. tank with only one or two people living here. I pumped the tank at seven years, and found a modest amount of sludge. Many people around here don't ever pump them, the sludge eventually gets into the drainage field, and then you have to replace the drainage field. That's a big expensive job.
                              Stan

                              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "CaseyM" <casey@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Thanks for everyones responses. It appears I need another way to dispose of the water and into the septic tank may not be the appropriate solution.
                              >
                              > Many thanks as always.
                              >
                              > Casey McGarr
                              > Inky Lips Letterpress
                              >
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