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Re: thinner plates/spider webbing

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  • Gerald Lange <bieler@worldnet.att.net>
    ... Brian Sounds funny coming back. Well... there are different effects if the roller is out of adjustment. Most common would be a paneling effect across the
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 12 8:59 PM
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      > what is spider webbing?


      Brian

      Sounds funny coming back.

      Well... there are different effects if the roller is out of
      adjustment. Most common would be a "paneling" effect across the floor
      of the plate. Quite obvious the rollers are completely out of whack,
      either that or there is no type high thing going on with base and
      plate and bed.

      Spider "webbing" is more a slight touchdown due to an oscillating
      roller or worn roller mechanism. As the roller slowly deviates from
      its setting, a slight tracking of ink the repeats itself along the
      floor of the plate during each additional impression( unless of course
      you catch it right away, ha!). The roller bearers and associated
      mechanisms on a Vandercook (specifically) weren't exactly designed for
      editioning. I've never seen a Vandercook that didn't oscillate to one
      degree or another. I've never used a platen jobber with photopolymer
      (I assume there is probably a similar effect).

      Another indicator is "nicking" (I've seen this referred to as
      "spitting"). Where the roller is inking an errant occurrence, a stray
      fragment of photopolymer left near type high due to cutting, etc., say
      if you are using prepress registration rule that you cut out (after
      registration) and a splinter of it remains.

      So, there you have it.

      Gerald
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