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Just starting out and seeking to pick your brain...muahahahaha (sorry Halloween)

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  • Amber Ellis-Seguine
    Thank you in advance for any information you are all willing to share. I recently purchased an Interflex A4, I have the manual, but beside that what would any
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 28, 2010
      Thank you in advance for any information you are all willing to share. I recently purchased an Interflex A4, I have the manual, but beside that what would any  of you recommend me reading to figure out how to make good plates? What do you suggest I start of trying to make, as far as images go? I would assume fine lines with block type would be a lot harder to make a plate for then something that is relatively moderate and even across the plate? (I am thinking of this process like developing pictures, where "dogging and burning" is necessary for different areas of the photograph) Clearly I have VERY VERY limited knowledge on these machines. But I tend to catch on quickly and I am not afraid to do the research. 

      And of course the usual question, if I use sticky back plates do you suggest buying them from some one other then Boxcar? Do you prefer a certain hardness? 

      Thank you all so much! 
      Amber


      • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
      Amber Ellis-Seguine
      650.468.9537
      650.347.4066
      • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




    • Peter Fraterdeus
      Professor Lange s excellent treatise is _de riguer_ of course... Slowprint.com / Semiotx.com google voice 1 563 223 8231 peterf@design.org From iPhone plz
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 29, 2010
        Professor Lange's excellent treatise is _de riguer_ of course...

        Slowprint.com / Semiotx.com
        google voice 1 563 223 8231

        From iPhone plz excuse brevity!

        On Oct 29, 2010, at 12:01 AM, Amber Ellis-Seguine <amber@...> wrote:

        Thank you in advance for any information you are all willing to share. I recently purchased an Interflex A4, I have the manual, but beside that what would any  of you recommend me reading to figure out how to make good plates? What do you suggest I start of trying to make, as far as images go? I would assume fine lines with block type would be a lot harder to make a plate for then something that is relatively moderate and even across the plate? (I am thinking of this process like developing pictures, where "dogging and burning" is necessary for different areas of the photograph) Clearly I have VERY VERY limited knowledge on these machines. But I tend to catch on quickly and I am not afraid to do the research. 

        And of course the usual question, if I use sticky back plates do you suggest buying them from some one other then Boxcar? Do you prefer a certain hardness? 

        Thank you all so much! 
        Amber


        • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
        Amber Ellis-Seguine
        650.468.9537
        650.347.4066
        • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




      • Peter Fraterdeus
        Get thee a Stouffer scale! http://www.stouffer.net/Stoufferhome1.htm Slowprint.com / Semiotx.com google voice 1 563 223 8231 peterf@design.org From iPhone plz
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 29, 2010
          Get thee a Stouffer scale!

          http://www.stouffer.net/Stoufferhome1.htm

          Slowprint.com / Semiotx.com
          google voice 1 563 223 8231
          peterf@...

          From iPhone plz excuse brevity!

          On Oct 29, 2010, at 12:01 AM, Amber Ellis-Seguine <amber@...> wrote:

          Thank you in advance for any information you are all willing to share. I recently purchased an Interflex A4, I have the manual, but beside that what would any  of you recommend me reading to figure out how to make good plates? What do you suggest I start of trying to make, as far as images go? I would assume fine lines with block type would be a lot harder to make a plate for then something that is relatively moderate and even across the plate? (I am thinking of this process like developing pictures, where "dogging and burning" is necessary for different areas of the photograph) Clearly I have VERY VERY limited knowledge on these machines. But I tend to catch on quickly and I am not afraid to do the research. 

          And of course the usual question, if I use sticky back plates do you suggest buying them from some one other then Boxcar? Do you prefer a certain hardness? 

          Thank you all so much! 
          Amber


          • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
          Amber Ellis-Seguine
          650.468.9537
          650.347.4066
          • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •




        • Eric
          You might try the photopolymer plate classes at SF Center for the Book. They are making both metal-and plastic-backed plates now, on a Polimero machine. The
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 30, 2010
            You might try the photopolymer plate classes at SF Center for the Book. They are making both metal-and plastic-backed plates now, on a Polimero machine. The cost of spoiled plates while experimenting might pay for the class.
            --Eric Holub, SF
          • bielerpr
            Amber I have some information here that might be of interest (and a manual): http://Bielerpressxi.blogspot.com Letterpress configured plates have a limited
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 2 1:18 AM
              Amber

              I have some information here that might be of interest (and a manual):

              http://Bielerpressxi.blogspot.com

              Letterpress configured plates have a limited range of hardness. There are plates being sold that do not meet this specification.

              Not sure why you are looking for an alternative to Boxcar but Elum Designs (in San Diego) is their main competitor. I offer processing of polyester-backed plates as well in the .038 configuration but my market for processing is largely configured to clients in Southern California (except for friends who have wandered afar, or just wandered in for one reason or another. I have a non-aggressive sales policy—what do you want, what do you need?).

              Gerald
              http://BielerPress.blogspot.com



              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Amber Ellis-Seguine <amber@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thank you in advance for any information you are all willing to share.
              > I recently purchased an Interflex A4, I have the manual, but beside
              > that what would any of you recommend me reading to figure out how to
              > make good plates? What do you suggest I start of trying to make, as
              > far as images go? I would assume fine lines with block type would be a
              > lot harder to make a plate for then something that is relatively
              > moderate and even across the plate? (I am thinking of this process
              > like developing pictures, where "dogging and burning" is necessary for
              > different areas of the photograph) Clearly I have VERY VERY limited
              > knowledge on these machines. But I tend to catch on quickly and I am
              > not afraid to do the research.
              >
              > And of course the usual question, if I use sticky back plates do you
              > suggest buying them from some one other then Boxcar? Do you prefer a
              > certain hardness?
              >
              > Thank you all so much!
              > Amber
              >
              >
              > • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
              > Amber Ellis-Seguine
              > www.flywheelpress.com
              > 650.468.9537
              > 650.347.4066
              > • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
              >
            • bielerpr
              Amber Misread your post. If you are looking for a source for raw photopolymer plates, first go to the manufacturer. Then go to their primary distributors. You
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 4 2:03 AM
                Amber

                Misread your post. If you are looking for a source for raw photopolymer plates, first go to the manufacturer. Then go to their primary distributors. You might even get a better price from a secondary distributor if there is some kind of sweet heart deal going on. Begs the question though, which brand of photopolymer plates are you interested in?

                Gerald
                http://BielerPress.blogspot.com





                > >
                > > Thank you in advance for any information you are all willing to share.
                > > I recently purchased an Interflex A4, I have the manual, but beside
                > > that what would any of you recommend me reading to figure out how to
                > > make good plates? What do you suggest I start of trying to make, as
                > > far as images go? I would assume fine lines with block type would be a
                > > lot harder to make a plate for then something that is relatively
                > > moderate and even across the plate? (I am thinking of this process
                > > like developing pictures, where "dogging and burning" is necessary for
                > > different areas of the photograph) Clearly I have VERY VERY limited
                > > knowledge on these machines. But I tend to catch on quickly and I am
                > > not afraid to do the research.
                > >
                > > And of course the usual question, if I use sticky back plates do you
                > > suggest buying them from some one other then Boxcar? Do you prefer a
                > > certain hardness?
                > >
                > > Thank you all so much!
                > > Amber
                > >
                > >
                > > • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
                > > Amber Ellis-Seguine
                > > www.flywheelpress.com
                > > 650.468.9537
                > > 650.347.4066
                > > • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
                > >
                >
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