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New To Group - LARGE photopolymer plates

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  • sculptarimx <gary@mozaya.com>
    Hello all, I am a sculptor and painter in Vancouver, Canada. I seem to have made at living at all this stuff for over ten years now, only by getting involved
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 5, 2003
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      Hello all, I am a sculptor and painter in Vancouver, Canada. I seem
      to have made at living at all this stuff for over ten years now, only
      by getting involved with all manner of projects and challenges.

      The challenge I bring today, is if anyone has experience making
      photopolymer plates up to 4 foot by 4 foot size? I am making a sort
      of reproduction mosaic, so what will become the 'grout' lines (black
      lines on the tracing paper/drawing, will need to be about 1/4 inch
      deep, but these are not hairline thin lines. I plan on casting a low
      temp wax into the plate and then finish the details on this casting.

      The "Ideal" photopolymer seems the best for me to use, they have a
      full system of chemicals, but as you know, there are no exposure
      tables that big, so I have to make one. I realise that I will need to
      experiment with exposure times, and keep careful records.

      Does project make anyone 'I've done that!" or a less enthusiastic 'I
      could do that".?
    • Gerald Lange <bieler@worldnet.att.net>
      Hi Gary Bit confused. Are you talking about polymer clay here? Sounds interesting. Like to hear more about the wax you are using. Gerald
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 5, 2003
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        Hi Gary

        Bit confused. Are you talking about polymer clay here?

        Sounds interesting. Like to hear more about the wax you are using.

        Gerald


        > The challenge I bring today, is if anyone has experience making
        > photopolymer plates up to 4 foot by 4 foot size? I am making a sort
        > of reproduction mosaic, so what will become the 'grout' lines (black
        > lines on the tracing paper/drawing, will need to be about 1/4 inch
        > deep, but these are not hairline thin lines. I plan on casting a low
        > temp wax into the plate and then finish the details on this casting.
        >
        > The "Ideal" photopolymer seems the best for me to use, they have a
        > full system of chemicals, but as you know, there are no exposure
        > tables that big, so I have to make one. I realise that I will need to
        > experiment with exposure times, and keep careful records.
        >
        > Does project make anyone 'I've done that!" or a less enthusiastic 'I
        > could do that".?
      • sculptarimx <gary@mozaya.com>
        Sorry Gerald - My first day here and I am already confusing - it usually takes me a whole week for that! Maybe I m in the wrong group. The liquid photopolymer
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 6, 2003
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          Sorry Gerald - My first day here and I am already confusing - it
          usually takes me a whole week for that!

          Maybe I'm in the wrong group. The liquid photopolymer resin is mostly
          used for flexographic printing (but I see all sorts of other uses on
          this site). It is also used for making rubber stamps. You typically
          make your own backing sheet, shine the bright UV light through the
          acetate sheet (or more typically transparency), on a sheet of glass -
          anything 'clear' becomes solid (well, durometer 50 'rubber' really in
          my application), anything 'black' will not be developed and washes
          away with water. The trouble is, that it is far from this simple and
          I would appreciate advice.

          Once I have the plate, it will withstand the heat of wax, I will
          pour the hot wax, take it out of the plate and refine the wax model.
          Ultimately it will become a mold for casting 'imitation' mosaic,
          which is beyond the discussion focus of this forum.
        • Gerald Lange <bieler@worldnet.att.net>
          Hi again Ha! not so fast. Sometimes we overlook possibilities. I only know a little bit about liguid photopolymer. Here (on this list), I suppose it would be
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 6, 2003
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            Hi again

            Ha! not so fast. Sometimes we overlook possibilities. I only know a
            little bit about liguid photopolymer. Here (on this list), I suppose
            it would be "old technology," but I do see a lot of experimenting with
            it in printmaking, and there is some amazing work happening.

            My interest in your mention of wax has to do with the potential for
            creating three-dimensional dies, probably using something like you are
            doing as a master. Just floating around an idea here.

            Thanks for your input

            Gerald
            >
            > Maybe I'm in the wrong group. The liquid photopolymer resin is mostly
            > used for flexographic printing (but I see all sorts of other uses on
            > this site). It is also used for making rubber stamps. You typically
            > make your own backing sheet, shine the bright UV light through the
            > acetate sheet (or more typically transparency), on a sheet of glass -
            > anything 'clear' becomes solid (well, durometer 50 'rubber' really in
            > my application), anything 'black' will not be developed and washes
            > away with water. The trouble is, that it is far from this simple and
            > I would appreciate advice.
            >
            > Once I have the plate, it will withstand the heat of wax, I will
            > pour the hot wax, take it out of the plate and refine the wax model.
            > Ultimately it will become a mold for casting 'imitation' mosaic,
            > which is beyond the discussion focus of this forum.
          • typetom@aol.com
            Hi Gary, I think Fritz Klinke at NA Graphics (nagraph@frontier.net) sells liquid photopolymer. I use pre-made steel-backed plates that have a relief of .060
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 7, 2003
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              Hi Gary,
              I think Fritz Klinke at NA Graphics (nagraph@...) sells liquid
              photopolymer. I use pre-made steel-backed plates that have a relief of .060"
              of polymer, so I don't have any experience with exposure times or wash-out
              for the liquid polymer of greater thickness. This stuff makes great printing
              plates -- sounds like you are on to an interesting use for it as well.
              Best wishes, Tom

              Tom Parson
              Now It's Up To You Publications
              157 S. Logan, Denver CO 80209
              (303) 777-8951
              http://members.aol.com/typetom
            • Ed Inman
              I d like to know more about liquid photopolymer as well. I was once told there is a process where, after exposure, the unexposed liquid photopolymer can be
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 7, 2003
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                I'd like to know more about liquid photopolymer as well. I was once told
                there is a process where, after exposure, the unexposed liquid photopolymer
                can be blown off the plate with high pressure air and recycled, as opposed
                to washed down the drain and wasted.

                Has anyone else heard of this process?

                Ed
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