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Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: replacing vandercook motor (Challenge Cutter motor)

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  • Peter Fraterdeus
    I m wondering what I can do about the incredibly loud compressor on my 19 Challenge hydraulic cutter? I can t use it for more than 20 minutes at a time due to
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 6, 2010
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      I'm wondering what I can do about the incredibly loud compressor on my 19" Challenge hydraulic cutter?

      I can't use it for more than 20 minutes at a time due to the volume.

      P

      On 6 Oct 2010, at 7:13 AM, CaseyM wrote:

      > I would suggest you have it rebuilt. Finding a replacement motor may be difficult. When I had my Vandercook Uni l motor rebuilt the cost was $350.00.
      >
      > Casey
      > Inky Lips Letterpress
      >
      >

      Peter Fraterdeus
      Exquisite letterpress takes time™
      http://slowprint.com/

      IdeasWords : Idea Swords
      Communication Strategy
      Semiotx.com @ideaswords
    • Bill Denham
      The only solution I know of for the noise of air compressors is to move the noise as far away as possible, preferably in a small sound proof closet or tool
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 6, 2010
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        The only solution I know of for the noise of air compressors is to move the noise as far away as possible, preferably in a small sound proof closet or tool room--still loud but livable. That's what I had to do with my hydraulic Malahide foil stamper years ago.

        Bill


        From: Peter Fraterdeus <peterf@...>
        To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, October 6, 2010 5:36:15 AM
        Subject: Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: replacing vandercook motor (Challenge Cutter motor)

        I'm wondering what I can do about the incredibly loud compressor on my 19" Challenge hydraulic cutter?

        I can't use it for more than 20 minutes at a time due to the volume.

        P

        On 6 Oct 2010, at 7:13 AM, CaseyM wrote:

        > I would suggest you have it rebuilt. Finding a replacement motor may be difficult. When I had my Vandercook Uni l motor rebuilt the cost was $350.00.
        >
        > Casey
        > Inky Lips Letterpress
        >
        >

        Peter Fraterdeus
        Exquisite letterpress takes time™
        http://slowprint.com/

        IdeasWords : Idea Swords
        Communication Strategy
        Semiotx.com  @ideaswords



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      • Kim Vanderheiden
        I went through this twice on my Vandercook 4. The first time we opened the old engine and noticed there was a beautiful brass gear which was crushed. We
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 6, 2010
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          I went through this twice on my Vandercook 4. The first time we opened the old engine and noticed there was a beautiful brass gear which was crushed. We machined a new gear, but within a year or so, we were having problems again.  The second time we just replaced the motor with a small one from Grainger. I'm not at the studio right now, but I can look up the model. As you've probably already discovered, the function of the motor is pretty simple. It just drives a bicycle chain that turns the ink drum. We've had no trouble with our motor since replacing it. We have had some issues with rollers chattering against eachother, but this seems to be caused by long time wear in the bearings and gears. I don't sense that it's caused by the specific speed that the motor turns the chain. 

          You might be fine with the confident electrician. The first time, a friend who liked to work on his motorcycle helped me. The second time, it was an assistant from Hicks Brothers, which deals in old printing an bindery equipment in San Francisco. The mechanism is simple and both seemed to know what they were doing with it. And it was the used press dealer assistant who replaced the motor, which is the same course your electrician is taking. I think you're probably ok. 

          Kim Vanderheiden


          Painted Tongue Studios
          Image + Words • Design + Art
          cell/main: 510.593.4221
          studio: 510.444.0458
          fax: 480.393.5653 

          Read about us on Companiesandme
          See recent work on our blog
          Visit us on Facebook
          Find us on Yelp







        • author50401
          You re correct in saying that the ink system drive motor can be fairly easily replaced. The motor Fritz may have been refering to is the drive motor for the
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 7, 2010
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            You're correct in saying that the ink system drive motor can be fairly easily replaced. The motor Fritz may have been refering to is the drive motor for the carriage of the Universal and powered 219 models. It is a different animal, and can be replaced, but due to the gear reduction coupling, is a much more complicated procedure.

            John H.

            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Kim Vanderheiden <paintedtongue@...> wrote:
            >
            > I went through this twice on my Vandercook 4. The first time we opened
            > the old engine and noticed there was a beautiful brass gear which was
            > crushed. We machined a new gear, but within a year or so, we were
            > having problems again. The second time we just replaced the motor
            > with a small one from Grainger. I'm not at the studio right now, but I
            > can look up the model. As you've probably already discovered, the
            > function of the motor is pretty simple. It just drives a bicycle chain
            > that turns the ink drum. We've had no trouble with our motor since
            > replacing it. We have had some issues with rollers chattering against
            > eachother, but this seems to be caused by long time wear in the
            > bearings and gears. I don't sense that it's caused by the specific
            > speed that the motor turns the chain.
            >
            > You might be fine with the confident electrician. The first time, a
            > friend who liked to work on his motorcycle helped me. The second time,
            > it was an assistant from Hicks Brothers, which deals in old printing
            > an bindery equipment in San Francisco. The mechanism is simple and
            > both seemed to know what they were doing with it. And it was the used
            > press dealer assistant who replaced the motor, which is the same
            > course your electrician is taking. I think you're probably ok.
            >
            > Kim Vanderheiden
            >
            >
            > Painted Tongue Studios
            > Image + Words • Design + Art
            > www.paintedtonguepress.com
            > www.kimvanderheiden.com
            > cell/main: 510.593.4221
            > studio: 510.444.0458
            > fax: 480.393.5653
            >
            > Read about us on Companiesandme
            > See recent work on our blog
            > Visit us on Facebook
            > Find us on Yelp
            >
          • author50401
            The noise in the Challenge Cutter is not an air compressor, but rather a hydraulic pump. It should not be extremely noisy, although certainly it does make some
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 7, 2010
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              The noise in the Challenge Cutter is not an air compressor, but rather a hydraulic pump. It should not be extremely noisy, although certainly it does make some noise when in good repair. There must be something loose or bearings which need replacement. You should be able to take it to an hydraulic systems repair shop (or have someone come in to check it over.

              John Henry

              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Bill Denham <bill1028@...> wrote:
              >
              > The only solution I know of for the noise of air compressors is to move the
              > noise as far away as possible, preferably in a small sound proof closet or tool
              > room--still loud but livable. That's what I had to do with my hydraulic Malahide
              > foil stamper years ago.
              >
              > Bill
            • Peter Fraterdeus
              Hi John Thanks for the note. It s not rattling except in the general sense of startlingly loud. Everything seems to work perfectly, so I think it s just the
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 7, 2010
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                Hi John

                Thanks for the note. It's not rattling except in the general sense of startlingly loud.
                Everything seems to work perfectly, so I think it's just the nature of the thing.

                Noise-canceling earphones have been suggested.

                P

                On 7 Oct 2010, at 8:02 AM, author50401 wrote:

                > The noise in the Challenge Cutter is not an air compressor, but rather a hydraulic pump. It should not be extremely noisy, although certainly it does make some noise when in good repair. There must be something loose or bearings which need replacement. You should be able to take it to an hydraulic systems repair shop (or have someone come in to check it over.
                >
                > John Henry
                >
                > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Bill Denham <bill1028@...> wrote:
                >>
                >> The only solution I know of for the noise of air compressors is to move the
                >> noise as far away as possible, preferably in a small sound proof closet or tool
                >> room--still loud but livable. That's what I had to do with my hydraulic Malahide
                >> foil stamper years ago.
                >>
                >> Bill
                >
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