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Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom

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  • Katelynn Corrigan
    Two little comments: First, the useful one- You do not have to pay $130 for a doctor blade from Heidelberg! Fritz sells them for $44. There are other off
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 13, 2010
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      Two little comments:

      First, the useful one- You do not have to pay $130 for a doctor blade from Heidelberg! Fritz sells them for $44. There are other 'off label' makers of them- the thing to look for is rubber all the way through and metal on both sides. Heidelberg changed the design of the 'sludge basin' a few times, sometimes for the worse, so don't freak out if you have to put some washers in to get it to line up correctly. A new doctor blade is a time-saver more than anything. A blunt one does the job, just more slowly.

      And, a musing- There seems to be much dismissal of ladies in the pressroom. There IS history of this, especially in rural areas. Woman have RUN newspapers and done every job there is to be had in the type foundry, composing room, and pressroom, as long as printing has been around. The trade was dominated by men but women WERE there.

      Anita- email me personally so I have your address. I want to send you a scan of a portrait of the employees of a small printing shop circa 1910- in which the men are all posing against the back wall and the sole LADY is feeding a platen press, with her Gibson girl hairdo and shirtwaist.

      -Katey
    • i_goonies
      Hello Katey, what s the link of Fritz? Thanks, Fabio
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 13, 2010
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        Hello Katey,
        what's the link of Fritz?

        Thanks,
        Fabio


        --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Katelynn Corrigan <crazyprettybird@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Two little comments:
        >
        > First, the useful one- You do not have to pay $130 for a doctor blade from Heidelberg! Fritz sells them for $44. There are other 'off label' makers of them- the thing to look for is rubber all the way through and metal on both sides. Heidelberg changed the design of the 'sludge basin' a few times, sometimes for the worse, so don't freak out if you have to put some washers in to get it to line up correctly. A new doctor blade is a time-saver more than anything. A blunt one does the job, just more slowly.
        >
        > And, a musing- There seems to be much dismissal of ladies in the pressroom. There IS history of this, especially in rural areas. Woman have RUN newspapers and done every job there is to be had in the type foundry, composing room, and pressroom, as long as printing has been around. The trade was dominated by men but women WERE there.
        >
        > Anita- email me personally so I have your address. I want to send you a scan of a portrait of the employees of a small printing shop circa 1910- in which the men are all posing against the back wall and the sole LADY is feeding a platen press, with her Gibson girl hairdo and shirtwaist.
        >
        > -Katey
        >
      • Selene F
        In case Katey doesn t check in soon, here s the link to NA Graphics.  The blades are toward the bottom of the page.  
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 14, 2010
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          In case Katey doesn't check in soon, here's the link to NA Graphics.  The blades are toward the bottom of the page.
           
           


          --- On Mon, 9/13/10, i_goonies <neroinferno@...> wrote:

          From: i_goonies <neroinferno@...>
          Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom
          To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, September 13, 2010, 11:02 PM

           
          Hello Katey,
          what's the link of Fritz?

          Thanks,
          Fabio

          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Katelynn Corrigan <crazyprettybird@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Two little comments:
          >
          > First, the useful one- You do not have to pay $130 for a doctor blade from Heidelberg! Fritz sells them for $44. There are other 'off label' makers of them- the thing to look for is rubber all the way through and metal on both sides. Heidelberg changed the design of the 'sludge basin' a few times, sometimes for the worse, so don't freak out if you have to put some washers in to get it to line up correctly. A new doctor blade is a time-saver more than anything. A blunt one does the job, just more slowly.
          >
          > And, a musing- There seems to be much dismissal of ladies in the pressroom. There IS history of this, especially in rural areas. Woman have RUN newspapers and done every job there is to be had in the type foundry, composing room, and pressroom, as long as printing has been around. The trade was dominated by men but women WERE there.
          >
          > Anita- email me personally so I have your address. I want to send you a scan of a portrait of the employees of a small printing shop circa 1910- in which the men are all posing against the back wall and the sole LADY is feeding a platen press, with her Gibson girl hairdo and shirtwaist.
          >
          > -Katey
          >

        • i_goonies
          Thank you! They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right? Thanks, Fabio
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 15, 2010
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            Thank you!

            They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right?

            Thanks,
            Fabio


            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Selene F <selene_f@...> wrote:
            >
            > In case Katey doesn't check in soon, here's the link to NA Graphics.  The blades are toward the bottom of the page.
            >  
            > http://order.nagraph.com/suckers-grippers-press-parts.html
            >  
            >
            >
            > --- On Mon, 9/13/10, i_goonies <neroinferno@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: i_goonies <neroinferno@...>
            > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom
            > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Monday, September 13, 2010, 11:02 PM
            >
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            >
            > Hello Katey,
            > what's the link of Fritz?
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Fabio
            >
            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Katelynn Corrigan <crazyprettybird@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > Two little comments:
            > >
            > > First, the useful one- You do not have to pay $130 for a doctor blade from Heidelberg! Fritz sells them for $44. There are other 'off label' makers of them- the thing to look for is rubber all the way through and metal on both sides. Heidelberg changed the design of the 'sludge basin' a few times, sometimes for the worse, so don't freak out if you have to put some washers in to get it to line up correctly. A new doctor blade is a time-saver more than anything. A blunt one does the job, just more slowly.
            > >
            > > And, a musing- There seems to be much dismissal of ladies in the pressroom. There IS history of this, especially in rural areas. Woman have RUN newspapers and done every job there is to be had in the type foundry, composing room, and pressroom, as long as printing has been around. The trade was dominated by men but women WERE there.
            > >
            > > Anita- email me personally so I have your address. I want to send you a scan of a portrait of the employees of a small printing shop circa 1910- in which the men are all posing against the back wall and the sole LADY is feeding a platen press, with her Gibson girl hairdo and shirtwaist.
            > >
            > > -Katey
            > >
            >
          • Eric
            ... Doctor blade is gravure terminology. Heidelberg calls it a rubber cleaner but any pressman would know it a washup blade. In this case it is a rubber
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 16, 2010
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              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "i_goonies" <neroinferno@...> wrote:
              >
              > They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right?
              >

              Doctor blade is gravure terminology. Heidelberg calls it a "rubber cleaner" but any pressman would know it a washup blade. In this case it is a rubber blade on a metal backing. I doubt this would remove the ink cleanly from the cylinder during regular operation, but is intended to remove ink as suspended in solvent during washup. But being rubber, you can cut portions away and give it try.
              --Eric Holub, SF
            • Mike Metz
              I don t know how long of a run is trying to be accomplished, but another idea might be to affix a piece of sponge/brillo to the washup blade, and then lightly
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 16, 2010
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                I don't know how long of a run is trying to be accomplished, but another idea might be to affix a piece of sponge/brillo to the washup blade, and then lightly soak it in washup solution. Maybe a combination of a reengineered washup blade (maybe replace the rubber with plastic) and add a divider on the inker. Fritz, here is a new product line for you.

                 

                Mike

                 

                From: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric
                Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2010 8:28 AM
                To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom

                 

                 



                --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "i_goonies" <neroinferno@...> wrote:

                >
                > They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right?
                >

                Doctor blade is gravure terminology. Heidelberg calls it a "rubber cleaner" but any pressman would know it a washup blade. In this case it is a rubber blade on a metal backing. I doubt this would remove the ink cleanly from the cylinder during regular operation, but is intended to remove ink as suspended in solvent during washup. But being rubber, you can cut portions away and give it try.
                --Eric Holub, SF

              • Les Taylor
                Hi, A Doctor blade is used to meter ink from the ink carrier to the substrate. In Gravure the ink fills tiny cells that make up image, in flexography an anilox
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 16, 2010
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                  Hi,
                  A Doctor blade is used to meter ink from the ink carrier to the substrate. In Gravure the ink fills tiny cells that make up image, in flexography an anilox roll is used. This is a roll filled with millions of holes called cells - all at the same depth. As the cells fill with ink the doctor blade wipes away the excess ink, efectively metering the same amount of ink every time.
                  Speeds of a kilometre a minute are achieved by this method with the latest gravure and flexo presses. Gutenberg would be proud as flexo (the son of Letterpress), is a raised surface printing method, that uses photopolymer plates instead of metal type.
                  Les
                   
                  Les

                  --- On Thu, 16/9/10, Eric <Megalonyx@...> wrote:

                  From: Eric <Megalonyx@...>
                  Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom
                  To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Thursday, 16 September, 2010, 13:28

                   


                  --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "i_goonies" <neroinferno@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right?
                  >

                  Doctor blade is gravure terminology. Heidelberg calls it a "rubber cleaner" but any pressman would know it a washup blade. In this case it is a rubber blade on a metal backing. I doubt this would remove the ink cleanly from the cylinder during regular operation, but is intended to remove ink as suspended in solvent during washup. But being rubber, you can cut portions away and give it try.
                  --Eric Holub, SF


                • Eric
                  ... On some duplicators, there are blanket cleaning attachments that use a heavy felt blade (with blanket wash applied) to remove ink from the blanket. I think
                  Message 8 of 13 , Sep 16, 2010
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                    --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Metz" <mtmetz@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I don't know how long of a run is trying to be accomplished, but another
                    > idea might be to affix a piece of sponge/brillo to the washup blade, and
                    > then lightly soak it in washup solution.

                    On some duplicators, there are blanket cleaning attachments that use a heavy felt blade (with blanket wash applied) to remove ink from the blanket. I think this would mainly be on presses with automatic plate changing. But you don't want solvent backflowing into the inking system.
                    The problem with the bare rubber blade and undiluted ink is that printing ink does not flow, and without solvent it will ball up on the blade and sometimes redeposit on the drum; plus friction may build up heat quickly and I've seen plastic washup blades melt when used incorrectly. The Baldwin device I mentioned would have used a hard blade, probably metal, and if angle and contact pressure could be precisely controlled, would strip ink cleanly, but unless it can positioned so that the ink is taken to the underside of the blade, redepositing remains a problem. And whatever is used you must be very sure that the drum doesn't get scratched. The Heidelberg cylinder washup blade is phenolyc board, like what is used in circuit boards in electronics. As hard as that is, I would never engage the blade before solvent had thinned the ink, and there are scars in the metal roller where previous operators misused the washup blade.
                    In many ways, running the two colors in two passes would the safest and simplest method.
                    --Eric Holub, SF
                  • Fritz Klinke
                    These can be had--price range around $189.00 each, but would have to be made custom for the Miehle Vertical and Heidelberg platen, and I would think only the
                    Message 9 of 13 , Sep 16, 2010
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                      These can be had--price range around $189.00 each, but would have to be made custom for the Miehle Vertical and Heidelberg platen, and I would think only the V-50 and 10x15 sizes. The price could come down a little if ordered in quantity, and since these are currently made only for offset presses, we'd have to come up with the specific measurements. The ones made for the V-36 and V-45 Verticals will not work with the V-50. These are properly called Ink Fountain Dividers. If enough interest, I'll look into having some made. Let me know.
                       
                      Fritz/NA Graphics
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Eric
                      Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2010 7:28 AM
                      Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom

                       



                      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "i_goonies" <neroinferno@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right?
                      >

                      Doctor blade is gravure terminology. Heidelberg calls it a "rubber cleaner" but any pressman would know it a washup blade. In this case it is a rubber blade on a metal backing. I doubt this would remove the ink cleanly from the cylinder during regular operation, but is intended to remove ink as suspended in solvent during washup. But being rubber, you can cut portions away and give it try.
                      --Eric Holub, SF

                    • Kathleen Whalen
                      Sorry to bother the List with this, but it¹s time-sensitive: Fritz ­ did you get my email order a couple of days ago? - it may be in your junk box! Graham
                      Message 10 of 13 , Sep 16, 2010
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                        Re: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom Sorry to bother the List with this, but it’s time-sensitive:

                        Fritz – did you get my email order a couple of days ago? - it may be in your junk box!


                        Graham Moss
                        Incline Press
                        36 Bow Street
                        Oldham OL1 1SJ  England

                        http://www.inclinepress.com






                      • author50401
                        I have read in older press manuals about using wadded, dampened paper as a fountain divider to separate or limit color in the fountain. It was recommended
                        Message 11 of 13 , Sep 17, 2010
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                          I have read in older press manuals about using wadded, dampened paper as a fountain divider to separate or limit color in the fountain. It was recommended instead of cranking down the fountain blade between colors.

                          I have a sample of a fountain divider which a pressman made by creating a clay dam on two sides and pouring typemetal between, creating a wedge-shaped partition which would separate two colors very well in a fountain.

                          One offset press I ran had rubber flaps on a rod which could be pressed down on a dampener ductor to reduce the flow of fountain solution in particular areas of the image where heavier ink film was required. I don't think the same technique can be applied to ink due to its increased viscosity.

                          J. Henry

                          --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Fritz Klinke" <nagraph@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > These can be had--price range around $189.00 each, but would have to be made custom for the Miehle Vertical and Heidelberg platen, and I would think only the V-50 and 10x15 sizes. The price could come down a little if ordered in quantity, and since these are currently made only for offset presses, we'd have to come up with the specific measurements. The ones made for the V-36 and V-45 Verticals will not work with the V-50. These are properly called Ink Fountain Dividers. If enough interest, I'll look into having some made. Let me know.
                          >
                          > Fritz/NA Graphics
                          >
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: Eric
                          > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                          > Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2010 7:28 AM
                          > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "i_goonies" <neroinferno@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right?
                          > >
                          >
                          > Doctor blade is gravure terminology. Heidelberg calls it a "rubber cleaner" but any pressman would know it a washup blade. In this case it is a rubber blade on a metal backing. I doubt this would remove the ink cleanly from the cylinder during regular operation, but is intended to remove ink as suspended in solvent during washup. But being rubber, you can cut portions away and give it try.
                          > --Eric Holub, SF
                          >
                        • matthew lamoureux
                          Rubber tabs on top of the ink roller, like on the fountain ductor of an offset press, would not work as the ink is metered from the fountain to the ink roller
                          Message 12 of 13 , Sep 17, 2010
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                            Rubber tabs on top of the ink roller, like on the fountain ductor of an offset press, would not work as the ink is metered from the fountain to the ink roller through the bottom turn of the fountain roller. You would have to have something under the ink fountain that scrapped the ink off the fountain roller. 

                            When I print split inks I have to keep the fountain key that lines up with the wedge just as open as the other keys.  I can't crank them down to keep the ink off the fountain roller to separate the colors, I end up with not enough ink in the train in order for them to blend together. 
                             
                            Matthew "LAMMY" Lamoureux
                            Full Metal Press - Operis servo a specialis nundinae

                            Where the press is free and every man able to read, all is safe.
                            Thomas Jefferson


                            When Benjamin Franklin exited the Constitutional Convention, he was asked by a woman, "Sir, what have you given us?" He replied, "A Republic, Ma'am, if you can keep it".



                            From: author50401 <JohnH@...>
                            To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Fri, September 17, 2010 9:12:35 AM
                            Subject: [PPLetterpress] Fountain Dividers

                             

                            I have read in older press manuals about using wadded, dampened paper as a fountain divider to separate or limit color in the fountain. It was recommended instead of cranking down the fountain blade between colors.

                            I have a sample of a fountain divider which a pressman made by creating a clay dam on two sides and pouring typemetal between, creating a wedge-shaped partition which would separate two colors very well in a fountain.

                            One offset press I ran had rubber flaps on a rod which could be pressed down on a dampener ductor to reduce the flow of fountain solution in particular areas of the image where heavier ink film was required. I don't think the same technique can be applied to ink due to its increased viscosity.

                            J. Henry

                            --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "Fritz Klinke" <nagraph@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > These can be had--price range around $189.00 each, but would have to be made custom for the Miehle Vertical and Heidelberg platen, and I would think only the V-50 and 10x15 sizes. The price could come down a little if ordered in quantity, and since these are currently made only for offset presses, we'd have to come up with the specific measurements. The ones made for the V-36 and V-45 Verticals will not work with the V-50. These are properly called Ink Fountain Dividers. If enough interest, I'll look into having some made. Let me know.
                            >
                            > Fritz/NA Graphics
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: Eric
                            > To: PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Thursday, September 16, 2010 7:28 AM
                            > Subject: [PPLetterpress] Re: Doctor blades & ladies in the pressroom
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, "i_goonies" <neroinferno@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > They seem a sort of screenprinting squeegees, right?
                            > >
                            >
                            > Doctor blade is gravure terminology. Heidelberg calls it a "rubber cleaner" but any pressman would know it a washup blade. In this case it is a rubber blade on a metal backing. I doubt this would remove the ink cleanly from the cylinder during regular operation, but is intended to remove ink as suspended in solvent during washup. But being rubber, you can cut portions away and give it try.
                            > --Eric Holub, SF
                            >


                          • Eric
                            ... Since this is an international list, this brings up another point of terminology. Americans refer to the ink (or water) fountain roller, and the ductor
                            Message 13 of 13 , Sep 20, 2010
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                              --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, matthew lamoureux <lamsland@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Rubber tabs on top of the ink roller, like on the fountain ductor of an offset
                              > press, would not work as the ink is metered from the fountain to the ink roller
                              > through the bottom turn of the fountain roller.

                              Since this is an international list, this brings up another point of terminology.
                              Americans refer to the ink (or water) fountain roller, and the ductor roller that carries ink to the distributors. British usage is ink duct rather than fountain, duct roller rather than fountain roller, and a lifter to transfer ink to the distributors. (I've also seen references to "waver' rollers, but don't recall if they are lifters or oscillators, also known as vibrators.)
                              Heidelberg manuals follow this differing usage based on intended market.
                              --Eric Holub, SF
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