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Re: "rejuvenating" old ink

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  • Eric
    ... If it is rubber base, then it is offset, not letterpress ink. But it certainly is used in letterpress printing just as many other offset inks can be.
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 20, 2010
      --- In PPLetterpress@yahoogroups.com, Scott Rubel <scott@...> wrote:
      >
      > It has been a few years since I used it, but it is rubber base and does take an awful long time to dry.

      If it is rubber base, then it is offset, not letterpress ink. But it certainly is used in letterpress printing just as many other offset inks can be. Rubber base has a shelf life a fraction of that of oil base ink, and can dry solid, with no skin.
      I read in some printing manual that linseed oil inks, when they were heavily skinned, could be remilled and new driers added. If you had some Carlson's ink or something else really good like that, maybe that would be worth exploring. But I doubt remilling a vintage ink could be made worth the time of any inkmaker today.
      --Eric Holub, SF
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